Unfortunately, Chihuahuas under 2 or 3 lbs are at greater risk when it comes to health. Their bones are more fragile. There isn't enough room in their mouth for healthy teeth. They can have difficulty regulating their blood sugar and can go into hypoglycemic shock if they go too long without eating. Their internal organs are often weak and can fail suddenly – you might come downstairs one morning and find them inexplicably dead in their basket.
I have just taken on an 11 year old foxy/chihuahua cross and her same age poodle/Maltese boy. The foxy cross only weighs about 3.5 kg. She is a delightful dog. Well house trained and a good inquisitive walker. After two weeks she is very protective of us. She seems fine with other adults and children. Though we don’t have any. She loves chasing balls and we spend time doing that with her as otherwise she has too much energy. She is very very smart. She likes to follow you everywhere and lies next to you once she has been exercised. She was an escape artist but I have had the door open inadvertently and she seemed to have been happy to stay. I adore both these dogs already.
Some of these tendencies can be helped through early training and socialization. Unfortunately, too many people with Chihuahuas allow them to become little tyrants, displaying manners that would not be acceptable in a larger dog. This dog needs gentle and consistent training from puppyhood on to control his nipping as well as any tendency he has to fight with other dogs. Like many small dogs, Chihuahuas aren't aware of their own size and won't hesitate to challenge a dog many times larger than themselves. Also, like many small dogs, Chihuahuas are difficult to house-train without a lot of consistency and patience.
In a 2000 review by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which examines data from both media reports and from the Humane Society of the United States, pit bull-type dogs were identified in approximately one-third of dog bite-related fatalities in the United States between 1981 and 1992. However, the review notes that studies on dog bite-related fatalities which collect information by surveying news reports are subject to potential errors, as some fatal attacks may not have been reported, a study might not find all relevant news reports, and the dog breed might be misidentified.[42] The AVMA has also noted fundamental problems with tracking breed in dog bite-related fatalities.[38] In a 2013 study of 256 fatalities in the United States from 2000 to 2009, the AVMA determined that valid breed determination was possible for only 17.6% of cases.[43]
My rescue is Iggyboo, a cairn terrier/Chihuahua mix, weighing in at 10 lbs and only 8 inches tall, now at almost 3 yrs. He is very protective and loyal, and pretty much a lap dog. He loves to play with his toys, and is highly intelligent, often preferring his interactive toys over stuffed ones. I find myself constantly teaching him new words or playing new games. He hates children and often adults, but can warm up to people given a few minutes and a few kind words (treats help this process). He also can be a challenge to walk, being aggressive to other dogs, but responds very well to a clicker and a treat for distraction. So, generally I have had no issues with him on walks, but am always careful. He loves bedtime, and burrows under the covers, sleeping a full 8 hours straight, he gets upset if I roll over and wake him up and will growl at me, lol.
The Beagle is a medium-sized breed belonging to the hound sporting group. Though many variations of this breed have existed throughout history, the modern breed emerged in England in the early 1800s. The Beagle is a popular choice for pet owners because of its size and calm temperament, and is useful for hunters because of its sharp sense of smell.
They have a smooth, somewhat domed skull with a medium-length, square-cut muzzle and a black (or occasionally liver) gumdrop nose. The jaw is strong and the teeth scissor together with the upper teeth fitting perfectly over the lower teeth and both sets aligned square to the jaw. The eyes are large, hazel or brown, with a mild hound-like pleading look. The large ears are long, soft and low-set, turning towards the cheeks slightly and rounded at the tips. Beagles have a strong, medium-length neck (which is long enough for them to easily bend to the ground to pick up a scent), with little folding in the skin but some evidence of a dewlap; a broad chest narrowing to a tapered abdomen and waist and a long, slightly curved tail (known as the "stern") tipped with white. The white tip, known as the flag. has been selectively bred for, as it allows the dog to be easily seen when its head is down following a scent.[31] The tail does not curl over the back, but is held upright when the dog is active. The beagle has a muscular body and a medium-length, smooth, hard coat. The front legs are straight and carried under the body while the rear legs are muscular and well bent at the stifles.[32]
Air France Safety Category 1 dogs, as defined by the French Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Forestry, are not permitted for transport in the cabin, or as baggage or cargo. These so-called "attack dogs" do not belong to a particular breed, but are similar in morphology to the following: Staffordshire Bull Terriers or American Staffordshire Terriers (pit bulls), Mastiffs and Tosas.[70]

If you live in a cold or rainy climate, housebreaking will be especially difficult, because Chihuahuas hate both the cold and the rain. In these climates, a COVERED potty area is strongly recommended. Sometimes a doggy door is necessary so your Chihuahua can run outside the moment he feels the urge in his tiny bladder. An indoor litterbox is another option.


Small hounds are mentioned in the Forest Laws of Canute which exempted them from the ordinance which commanded that all dogs capable of running down a stag should have one foot mutilated.[2] If genuine, these laws would confirm that beagle-type dogs were present in England before 1016, but it is likely the laws were written in the Middle Ages to give a sense of antiquity and tradition to Forest Law.[3]
In March I adopted what was thought to be a “Chihuahua/Cairn Terrier” cross when he was 2 months old, and he’s now just over 3 months. He’s a feisty little guy, 6 lbs., who is all puppy teeth and hasn’t quite figured out potty training yet. I adopted him from our local Animal Control shelter because those animals have a harder time than our SPCA rescues being adopted, plus the price is reasonable, and their care good.
Pit bulls also constitute the majority of dogs used for illegal dog fighting in America.[10] In addition, law enforcement organisations report these dogs are used for other nefarious purposes, such as guarding illegal narcotics operations.[11][12] use against police,[13] and as attack dogs.[14] On the other side of the law, pit bulls have been used as police dogs.[15][16]
Not every Beagle visit to the vet is for a genetic problem. The Beagle’s long, floppy ears are prone to chronic ear infections. Left untreated, such infections can cause permanent damage to the ear canal and even destroy your dog's hearing. Checking ears often and seeing the veterinarian at the first whiff of a problem combined with good follow-through will keep a Beagle’s ears from being an expensive and painful problem.
Avoid breeders who only seem interested in how quickly they can unload a puppy on you and whether your credit card will go through. You should also bear in mind that buying a puppy from websites that offer to ship your dog to you immediately can be a risky venture, as it leaves you no recourse if what you get isn’t exactly what you expected. Put at least as much effort into researching your puppy as you would into choosing a new car or expensive appliance. It will save you money in the long run. For more information about the breed or to find a list of breeders, visit the website of the National Beagle Club.
Their long floppy ears can mean that the inner ear does not receive a substantial air flow or that moist air becomes trapped, and this can lead to ear infections. Beagles may also be affected by a range of eye problems; two common ophthalmic conditions in beagles are glaucoma and corneal dystrophy.[55] "Cherry eye", a prolapse of the gland of the third eyelid, and distichiasis, a condition in which eyelashes grow into the eye causing irritation, sometimes exist; both these conditions can be corrected with surgery.[49] They can suffer from several types of retinal atrophy. Failure of the nasolacrimal drainage system can cause dry eye or leakage of tears onto the face.[49]
Chihuahuas (and Chihuahua crosses and mixes) are frequently available from Dog Rescue groups. Chihuahuas may be turned over to Rescue because of housebreaking problems, or barking, or general nastiness when unsocialized or treated like babies. Other Chihuahuas are given up simply because of changed family circumstances, and these dogs may have no behavior problems at all.

The largest state in Mexico, Chihuahua is headquarters for the world’s fifth largest oil company, Pertróleos Mexicanos. It is also where one of the smallest canine breeds, the Chihuahua, originated. After railroad travel to the Copper Canyon area was upgraded following privatization of the railroad in 1998, tourism became an important and growing segment of the economy. Attractions include the beautiful Copper Canyon region and Pancho Villa’s mansion.

In the 1840s, a standard beagle type was beginning to develop; the distinction between the North Country Beagle and Southern Hound had been lost, but there was still a large variation in size, character, and reliability among the emerging packs.[12] In 1856, "Stonehenge" (the pseudonym of John Henry Walsh), writing in the Manual of British Rural Sports, was still dividing beagles into four varieties: the medium beagle; the dwarf or lapdog beagle; the fox beagle (a smaller, slower version of the Foxhound); and the rough-coated or terrier beagle, which he classified as a cross between any of the other varieties and one of the Scottish terrier breeds.[13] Stonehenge also gives the start of a standard description:
All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit a particular disease. Run, don’t walk, from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee on puppies, who tells you that the breed is 100 percent healthy and has no known problems, or who tells you that her puppies are isolated from the main part of the household for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur in her lines. Here’s a brief rundown on what you should know.
Due to their athleticism and diverse breeding background, the Pit Bull breed tends to be hardy, with an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, longer than many breeds of a similar size. There are some genetic conditions to be watchful for. The Pit Bull tends to suffer from bone diseases such as hip dysplasia, degenerative myelopathy and kneecap dislocation. The Pit Bull can also suffer from skin problems, such as mange and skin allergies, because of its short coat. Other health ailments seen in Pit Bulls include thyroid and congenital heart defects.
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