Beagles like to do what they want to do, not necessarily what you want them to do. They are true masters when it comes to selective hearing. If a Beagle isn’t interested in the request you’ve made — commands are futile with this breed — he will simply ignore you or wander off. That can be frustrating if you’re not prepared for it. Successfully living with a Beagle means making everything a game, one that will hold his attention.
Hip Dysplasia: This is an inherited condition in which the thighbone doesn't fit snugly into the hip joint. Some dogs show pain and lameness on one or both rear legs, but others don't display outward signs of discomfort. (X-ray screening is the most certain way to diagnose the problem.) Either way, arthritis can develop as the dog ages. Dogs with hip dysplasia should not be bred — so if you're buying a puppy, ask the breeder for proof that the parents have been tested for hip dysplasia and are free of problems.
He is a sweet dog inside our home and with friends and family, although territorial when in the patio. A few months ago my brother took him to the vet because he was limping. Everything was fine until he spotted another pitbull in the room. An embarrassed moment there, my brother who is a body builder, had to control and carry him out and we had to call another vet to prepare a separate room for him. No problem at the other vet's place, however no pitbulls there.
Testing of cosmetic products on animals is banned in the member states of the European Community,[74] although France protested the ban and has made efforts to have it lifted.[75] It is permitted in the United States but is not mandatory if safety can be ascertained by other methods, and the test species is not specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).[76] When testing toxicity of food additives, food contaminants, and some drugs and chemicals the FDA uses beagles and miniature pigs as surrogates for direct human testing.[77] Minnesota was the first state to enact a Beagle freedom adoption law in 2014, mandating that dogs and cats are allowed to be adopted once they have completed with research testing.[78]
And before you decide to buy a puppy, consider whether an adult Chihuahua might better suit your needs and lifestyle. Puppies are loads of fun, but they require a lot of time and effort before they grow up to become the dog of your dreams. An adult Chihuahua may already have some training and will probably be less active, destructive and demanding than a puppy. With an adult, you know more about what you’re getting in terms of personality and health and you can find adults through breeders or shelters. If you are interested in acquiring an older dog through breeders, ask them about purchasing a retired show dog or if they know of an adult dog who needs a new home. If you want to adopt a dog, read the advice below on how to do that.
Accustom your American Pit Bull Terrier to being brushed and examined when he's a puppy. Handle his paws frequently — dogs are touchy about their feet — and look inside his mouth and ears. Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you'll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he's an adult.
Accustom your American Pit Bull Terrier to being brushed and examined when he's a puppy. Handle his paws frequently — dogs are touchy about their feet — and look inside his mouth and ears. Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you'll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he's an adult.
Beagles were in the United States by the 1840s at the latest, but the first dogs were imported strictly for hunting and were of variable quality. Since Honeywood had only started breeding in the 1830s, it is unlikely these dogs were representative of the modern breed and the description of them as looking like straight-legged Dachshunds with weak heads has little resemblance to the standard. Serious attempts at establishing a quality bloodline began in the early 1870s when General Richard Rowett from Illinois imported some dogs from England and began breeding. Rowett's Beagles are believed to have formed the models for the first American standard, drawn up by Rowett, L. H. Twadell, and Norman Ellmore in 1887.[17] The beagle was accepted as a breed by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1885.[18] In the 20th century the breed has spread worldwide.
Contrary to popular myth, pit bulls do not have "locking jaws".[44] There is no physiological "locking mechanism" in the jaw muscle and bone structure of pit bulls or other dogs.[45] Pit bull-type dogs, like other terriers, hunting and bull-baiting breeds,[46] can exhibit a bite, hold, and shake behavior and at times refuse to release.[12][47][48] Pit bulls also have wide skulls, well-developed facial muscles, and strong jaws,[44] and some research suggests that pit bull bites are particularly serious because they tend to bite deeply and grind their molars into tissue.[49] Breaking an ammonia ampule and holding it up to the dog's nose can cause the dog to release its hold.[47]
Whether you’re planning to get your new best friend from a breeder, a pet store, or another source, don’t forget that old adage “let the buyer beware”. Disreputable breeders and facilities that deal with puppy mills can be hard to distinguish from reliable operations. There’s no 100% guaranteed way to make sure you’ll never purchase a sick puppy, but researching the breed (so you know what to expect), checking out the facility (to identify unhealthy conditions or sick animals), and asking the right questions can reduce the chances of heading into a disastrous situation. And don’t forget to ask your veterinarian, who can often refer you to a reputable breeder, breed rescue organization, or other reliable source for healthy puppies. 
Remember that after you’ve taken a new puppy into your home, you have the power to protect him from two of the most common health problems: obesity (which makes other health issues worse) and eating inappropriate objects. Keeping a Beagle at an appropriate weight is one of the easiest ways to extend his life, and close supervision of what he’s chewing on can save you big bucks at the veterinary hospital. Make the most of your preventive abilities to help ensure a healthier dog for life.

I have a male Chiweenie/terrier (probably Cairn) mix possibly with some Chinese crested. I rescued him when he was just a little over a year (a vets office was taking care of him so he was well socialized and loved there). He is the best dog I could every hope for. They had named him Foo Man Chu because of his beard but I named him Cooper. He is black with a little white on his feet. His underbelly has almost no hair. He is a great watch dog which I wanted since I work from home. He doesn’t bark unless he hears something. He loves everyone, literally, especially kids. I have made a point of showing the kids in my complex how to approach a small dog. Cooper loves to give kisses. When he sees someone he knows his tail wagging could knock you over and he only weighs 10 pounds. The only issues I have had are the allergies and the luxating patella. He starts to skip a little when he has done too much. Although he could play with his bff for hours, it can take him a couple of days to recover so I watch that. He loves to lay in his bed next to my computer and WATCH ME work. Of course he loves belly rubs. He rides in the car very well. He is 5 now and is my superdooperCooper!

Wherever you acquire your Beagle, make sure you have a good contract with the seller, shelter or rescue group that spells out responsibilities on both sides. Petfinder offers an Adopters Bill of Rights that helps you understand what you can consider normal and appropriate when you get a dog from a shelter. In states with “puppy lemon laws,” be sure you and the person you get the dog from both understand your rights and recourses.

Because of their dog-fighting heritage, some American Pit Bull Terriers retain a tendency to be aggressive with other dogs, but if they are socialized early and trained to know what behavior is expected of them, that aggression can be minimized or overcome, and many are dog- and cat-friendly. Just to be safe, they should always be supervised in the presence of other pets.
Great article! I hate the stigma associated with this loving, loyal, clownish breed. We adopted Kane (pictured) in December. Now, I will be honest, it's been sort of a rocky relationship between Kane and the resident cats, but that's because Kane was one-and-a-half years old when he became a part of our family. But he's learning that cats are his friend. It's a slow process but I knew that already and was prepared. Pits are just like kids - they learn from their environment. Now Kane has a loving, fun, and safe environment he can learn and grow from. I've owned many different dog breeds and by far, even with his "shady" past, Kane has showed us more love and affection than any other.
According to the American Temperament Test Society[1], the Pit Bull is second only to the Labrador Retriever in terms of temperament. The test was carried out on as many breeds as possible, administering and recording the test to find out which breeds met the highest standards in terms of temperament. This involved meeting oddly dressed strangers, firing guns to potentially spook them, walking on uncomfortable surfaces and more. They are carried out by professionals and are repeated as much as possible.

Beagles bond with everyone in the family, especially children. They can be rambunctious when playing, however, so they need to be properly socialized and supervised with very young children. In addition, Beagles tend to be "mouthy," grabbing things, including your or your child's hand, with their mouths to play. They do this in fun and can be trained not to do this.
In the 11th century, William the Conqueror brought the Talbot hound to Britain. The Talbot was a predominantly white, slow, deep-throated, scent hound derived from the St. Hubert Hound which had been developed in the 8th century. At some point the English Talbots were crossed with Greyhounds to give them an extra turn of speed.[4] Beagles are similar to the Harrier and the extinct Southern Hound, though smaller and slower.[5][b]
Wherever you acquire your Chihuahua, make sure you have a good contract with the seller, shelter or rescue group that spells out responsibilities on both sides. Petfinder offers an Adopters Bill of Rights that helps you understand what you can consider normal and appropriate when you get a dog from a shelter. In states with “puppy lemon laws,” be sure you and the person you get the dog from both understand your rights and recourses.
The Beagle originated in England. His heritage stretches back to the packs of hunting hounds kept by landed gentry to hunt deer and hare. Beagle-like scenthounds were known as far back as 1475, when the word “Beagle” was first used to describe this type of hunting dog. It’s a matter of debate whether the name comes from a Celtic word meaning “small” or a French word meaning “open mouth” or “loud mouth.” Given the Beagle’s propensity for baying when he catches an interesting scent on the wind, the latter theory seems most likely.
The Chihuahua is a tiny toy sized dog. The body is longer than it is tall. The head is well-rounded, apple in shape and the muzzle is short and pointed with a well-defined stop. Puppies have a soft spot on the top of the skull called a "molera," which usually closes by adulthood. The large, round eyes are set well apart and are dark, ruby, and may be lighter in white dogs. Eye color varies and are often dark, but the merle gene can produce a dog with blue eyes. The erect ears are large. Dewclaws may be removed. The tail is long, sickle-shaped and either curled over the back or to the side. The coat can be short, long and wavy or flat. All colors, both solid, marked or splashed are accepted. Colors include, but are not limited to, black, white, chestnut, fawn, sand, silver, sable, steel blue, black & tan and parti-color.
The smallest breed of dog, the Chihuahua has a controversial history. One theory holds that it originated in China and was brought to the New World by Spanish traders, where it was then crossed with small native dogs. The other theory contends that it originated entirely in Central and South America, descending from the native Techichi. A small red dog was believed to guide the soul to the underworld, and every Aztec family kept such a dog that was buried with any deceased family member. To make matters worse for the Techichi, the Toltecs and their conquerors, the Aztecs, often ate dogs and the Techichi may have sometimes been on the menu. Despite what may have been short lives, the Techichis apparently were well cared for during life by the priests or their families. In fact, the most likely origin of the Chihuahua is a combination of these theories: the native Techichi was probably crossed with tiny hairless Chinese dogs, but again the date when this occurred is controversial.
A very common misconception is that APBTs are muscle-bound hulks that weigh in around 85 pounds (39 kg) or more and this is generally not the majority. Most of the APBT's that are that large have been crossed with other breeds and are being called American Bullies. The general public often gets American Bullies mixed up with the American Pitbull Terriers. American Pitbull Terrier vs. American Bully

Hunters could follow these dogs on foot and could even carry one in a pocket if the need arose. By the 1800s, Beagles existed in several sizes, but the smaller “pocket-size” dogs were particularly popular. These dogs measured only about 9 inches and often needed the hunter’s assistance in crossing rough fields. One of the special appeals of the smaller Beagles was that the hunt could be followed even by “ladies, the aged, or the infirm,” as they slowly followed the winding path of the hare.
The Terrier Maltese mix is an affectionate dog that loves people and they love it back. This hybrid has a winning personality but can also be bullheaded. Someone with experience with small breeds is ideal but a Morkie can actually be good even with first-time dog owners. They are good companions for singles, seniors, and families with older children.
In the United States they appear to have been employed chiefly for hunting rabbits from the earliest imports. Hunting hare with beagles became popular again in Britain in the mid-19th century and continued until it was made illegal in Scotland by the Protection of Wild Mammals (Scotland) Act 2002 and in England and Wales by the Hunting Act 2004. Under this legislation beagles may still pursue rabbits with the landowner's permission. Drag hunting is popular where hunting is no longer permitted or for those owners who do not wish to participate in hunting a live animal, but still wish to exercise their dog's innate skills.
The Beagle has an average lifespan of 12 to 15 years. While this breed is generally healthy overall, some specific ailments that are known to affect the Beagle breed are patellar luxation, glaucoma, epilepsy, central progressive retinal atrophy (CPRA), hypothyroidism, distichiasis, chondrodysplasia, cherry eye, and keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). Deafness, cataract, hemophilia A, demodicosis, and umbilical hernia are some other health problems that affect the breed, while some major ailments include primary carnitine deficiency (CUD) and intervertebral disk disease. Some exams used to identify these conditions include hip, thyroid, and eye tests.
Finally, a long coat can be a single coat, with no undercoat. A single coat lies flatter against the body than a double coat because there's no undercoat pushing it away from the body. In fact, some long coated Chihuahuas hardly look longhaired at all and are mainly identified by the tufts of hair around the base of their ears and some feathering on their legs, stomach, and tail. A single coat feels the cold more, but is easier to groom and sheds less than a double coat.
English and American varieties are sometimes mentioned. However, there is no official recognition from any Kennel Club for this distinction. Beagles fitting the American Kennel Club standard – which disallows animals over 15 inches (38 cm) – are smaller on average than those fitting the Kennel Club standard which allows heights up to 16 inches (41 cm).
I just lost my little girl; she was a Wirehaired Terrier Chihuahua mix who was almost 18-years-old. I know that people tell me that was a good long run for a dog, but for me, it just wasn’t long enough. She had bonded to me, and since I retired two and a half years ago, we have been inseparable. Her name was Zoie, and she followed me everywhere. If she was asleep and I left the room, she would wake up and look for me. She was the smartest dog that I have had. I am heartbroken with the loss. Three nights ago, she died in my arms with me, begging for her to stay with me. I can’t replace her, but maybe I can fill the hole in my heart that was created when she was taken from me. After reading your article, I am concerned about getting a healthy dog.
Any dog, no matter how nice, can develop obnoxious levels of barking, digging, food stealing and other undesirable behaviors if he is bored, untrained or unsupervised. And any dog can be a trial to live with during adolescence. In the case of the Beagle, the “teen” years can start at six months and continue until the dog is about three years old and sometimes throughout life. Some Beagles just never lose that fun-loving, happy-go-lucky puppy nature. While it makes them entertaining to live with, it also means that they need more supervision than the average adult dog. Fair warning!
As purebred dogs, beagles have always been more popular in the United States and Canada than in their native country England. The National Beagle Club of America was formed in 1888 and by 1901 a beagle had won a Best in Show title. As in the UK, activity during World War I was minimal, but the breed showed a much stronger revival in the U.S. when hostilities ceased. In 1928 it won a number of prizes at the Westminster Kennel Club's show and by 1939 a beagle – Champion Meadowlark Draughtsman – had captured the title of top-winning American-bred dog for the year.[21] On 12 February 2008, a beagle, K-Run's Park Me In First (Uno), won the Best In Show category at the Westminster Kennel Club show for the first time in the competition's history.[22] In North America they have been consistently in the top-ten most-popular breeds for over 30 years. From 1953 to 1959 the beagle was ranked No. 1 on the list of the American Kennel Club's registered breeds;[23] in 2005 and 2006 it ranked 5th out of the 155 breeds registered.[24] In the UK they are not quite so popular, placing 28th and 30th in the rankings of registrations with the Kennel Club in 2005 and 2006 respectively.[25] In the United States the beagle ranked 4th most popular breed in 2012 and 2013, behind the Labrador Retriever (#1), German Shepherd (#2) and Golden Retriever (#3) breeds.[26]
As for eating, well, Beagles will try to eat anything. They are professional food thieves, and they will eat anything that even looks like it might be food, including things that you wouldn’t imagine would interest them. If nothing else, living with a Beagle will teach you, your spouse and your kids not to leave food of any kind within a Beagle’s nose range.
By 1887 the threat of extinction was on the wane: there were 18 beagle packs in England.[14] The Beagle Club was formed in 1890 and the first standard drawn up at the same time.[15] The following year the Association of Masters of Harriers and Beagles was formed. Both organisations aimed to further the best interests of the breed, and both were keen to produce a standard type of beagle.[16] By 1902, the number of packs had risen to 44.[14]
Robin Rock is the founder and director of Measle’s Animal Haven Pit Bull Rescue, a 501(c)(3) non-profit rescue and sanctuary consisting of foster homes in Central Ohio. Robin has been rescuing, rehabilitating and advocating for Pit Bulls for over 10 years, and she has worked with thousands of Pit Bulls. She lives with her husband Joe, their five children, adopted dogs and cats and various foster dogs.
As field dogs they are prone to minor injuries such as cuts and sprains, and, if inactive, obesity is a common problem as they will eat whenever food is available and rely on their owners to regulate their weight.[49] When working or running free they are also likely to pick up parasites such as fleas, ticks, harvest mites, and tapeworms, and irritants such as grass seeds can become trapped in their eyes, soft ears, or paws.[56]
Prone to rheumatism, slipped stifle, colds and gum problems. Also corneal dryness and secondary glaucoma, due to their protruding eyes. Gains weight easily. Take caution around toxic products such as chocolate or fertilizer. This is a very small breed and it will not take much to poison them. Chihuahuas are often born via cesarean section because puppies are born with relatively large heads. Susceptible to fractures and other accidents in puppyhood. Some Chihuahuas have a molera, an unclosed section of the skull which can remain open throughout life. This makes the dog prone to injury. Has a tendency to wheeze and snore because of their small, short muzzles. Prone to stress, caused by the owners tendency to treat them like little babies. All dogs, even tiny ones, need to feel their owners are strong-minded beings able to handle the entire pack.
A Maltese mixed with Terrier is generally healthy but due to its size, it is fragile. Make sure you handle and play with your Morkie in a gentle manner. It’s not built for the roughhousing that bigger dogs are fond of. This is also why this dog is best suited for a sole owner or a couple with older children. Very young children don’t understand a dog’s fragility yet and could accidentally hurt their pet Morkie.
Dogs of either coat type may be identified as either "apple head" or "deer head" Chihuahuas, particularly in the United States. Apple heads have rounded heads, close-set eyes, and relatively short ears and legs. Deer heads have flat-topped heads, more widely set eyes, larger ears, and longer, more slender legs. Deer heads were the breed standard conformation in the mid-20th century, but current breed standards defined by registries such as the AKC specify the apple-head conformation.[13]
Violent interactions between humans and canines have been studied by the U.S. government,[30] notably the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),[31] as well as academic veterinary researchers.[1] The interpretation of these studies, breed identification and relevance[32] issues, and variable circumstances have given rise to intense controversy.[33][34][35]
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