How do Chihuahuas get along with dogs outside their own family? Often not well. Chihuahuas often raise a ruckus when they spy a strange dog, especially a larger dog. It's as though the Chihuahua wants to convince the larger dog that he is a force to reckon with rather than a helpless prey animal. The Chihuahua may be seeking to protect itself by putting up a blustering facade that tells the other dog to "move along."
Finding a good breeder is the key to finding the right puppy. A good breeder will match you with the right puppy, and will without question have done all the health certifications necessary to screen out health problems as much as possible. He or she is more interested in placing pups in the right homes than making big bucks. Good breeders will welcome your questions about temperament, health clearances and what the dogs are like to live with and come right back at you with questions of their own about what you’re looking for in a dog and what kind of life you can provide for him. Most breeders like to keep the pups until they are 12 to 14 weeks old to ensure that they are mature enough to go to their new homes.

The Pit Bull immediately strikes one as being a dog of power, passion and undying willingness. The brick-like head, which is especially broad between the cheeks (to house the powerful jaws), is carried upon a thickly muscled, well-defined neck. The neck runs into a deep, thick, well-sprung chest. The American Pit Bull is a very muscular, stocky, yet agile dog that is extremely strong for his size.The tail tapers to a point. The ears are generally cropped, though this is optional. Docked tails are not accepted by the UKC or the ADBA. The eyes are round. Both the ADBA and the UKC do not accept blue eyes or the coat color merle. The American Pitbull Registry does accept a merle coat. The teeth should form a scissors bite. Its coat is made up of thick, short, shiny hair. All colors are admissible. Shades of brown to red with a matching red/brown nose are referred to as red-nose Pit Bulls. Shades of gray with a matching gray nose are referred to as blue-nose Pit Bulls.
The Chihuahua (affectionately called 'Chi') may descend either from tiny, hairless Chinese dogs or the South American 'Techichi', a favored pet which was buried with the deceased in the hope they would lead the way to the afterlife. Modern Chihuahuas hail from Chihuahua, Mexico. They are the smallest dog breed and the oldest North American breed. They rocketed to popularity in the U.S when famous Latin musician Xavier Cugat made a Chihuahua his constant public companion, and remain extremely popular to this day. Famous Chihuahuas include the Taco Bell Chihuahua, Ren from 'Ren and Stimpy', and Ducky, the 2007 ‘Guinness Book of World Records’ winner for ‘World's Smallest Living Dog’.
Beagles like to do what they want to do, not necessarily what you want them to do. They are true masters when it comes to selective hearing. If a Beagle isn’t interested in the request you’ve made — commands are futile with this breed — he will simply ignore you or wander off. That can be frustrating if you’re not prepared for it. Successfully living with a Beagle means making everything a game, one that will hold his attention.
Glaucoma: This is a painful disease in which pressure in the eye becomes abnormally high. Eyes are constantly producing and draining a fluid called aqueous humor — if the fluid doesn't drain correctly, the pressure inside the eye increases causing damage to the optic nerve and resulting in vision loss and blindness. There are two types. Primary glaucoma, which is hereditary, and secondary glaucoma which is a result of inflammation, a tumor, or injury. Glaucoma generally affects one eye first, which will be red, teary, squinty, and appear painful. A dilated pupil won't react to light, and the front of the eye will have a whitish, almost blue cloudiness. Vision loss and eventually blindness will result, sometimes even with treatment (surgery or medication, depending on the case).

These dogs are extremely intelligent and learn commands and tricks with ease. They have a zest for life and love to be involved in everything going on around them. They maintain a puppyish demeanor well into adulthood, and that vitality makes them a joy to live with. Once you have met and gotten to know this breed you will wonder how you ever lived without one.
Feisty is the word most often used to describe terriers. From the Latin terra, for earth, most terriers were originally bred to "go to ground" after burrowing vermin, larger rodents and even foxes. These fiery little dynamos would dig up underground dens and burrows while barking furiously, forcing the inhabitants out where hunters awaited. Some breeds were even bred to finish the job themselves. Let loose in your backyard, a terrier can build an entire golf course in a day — the 18 holes at least. Too large to go to ground, the popular Airedale terrier puts its strength and stubborn streak to use as a surprisingly ferocious watchdog. Like most terriers, this "king of terriers" has little time for other dogs, and if not properly supervised may engage in some street brawling. If it weren't for the fact that most terriers, such as the Cairn and the Norfolk, are fairly small, their tenacious nature and boundless energy would make them hard to control. Due to some unscrupulous breeders and unmindful owners, a few breeds within the terrier group have developed rather notorious reputations. The crossing of bulldogs and terriers for the express purpose of creating fighting dogs has produced several dog breeds that can be dangerous in the wrong hands. Combining the taut muscles and compact power of the bulldog with the tenacity and aggressiveness of the terrier, some controversial bull terrier breeds have been involved in some highly publicized biting incidents, several involving small children. When these dogs bite, they don't let go. Unfortunately, these incidents tarnish the reputations of what can be friendly, stable, even calm pets. But without the right training and socialization, and in irresponsible hands, these can be dangerous dogs.
There are two Beagle varieties: those standing under 13 inches at the shoulder, and those between 13 and 15 inches. Both varieties are sturdy, solid, and “big for their inches,” as dog folks say. They come in such pleasing colors as lemon, red and white, and tricolor. The Beagle’s fortune is in his adorable face, with its big brown or hazel eyes set off by long, houndy ears set low on a broad head.

Sites like Petfinder.com and Adopt-a-Pet.com can have you searching for a Beagle in your area in no time flat. The site allows you to be very specific in your requests (housetraining status, for example) or very general (all the Beagles available on Petfinder across the country). AnimalShelter can help you find animal rescue groups in your area. Also some local newspapers have “pets looking for homes” sections you can review.


You should also bear in mind that buying a puppy from websites that offer to ship your dog to you immediately can be a risky venture, as it leaves you no recourse if what you get isn’t exactly what you expected. Put at least as much effort into researching your puppy as you would into choosing a new car or expensive appliance. It will save you money in the long run.
Beagles are generally healthy, but certain health problems can affect them if breeders aren’t careful about performing health checks. They include hip dysplasia, a genetic malformation of the hip socket and certain types of heart conditions. Despite good breeding, Beagles may experience tears of the anterior cruciate ligament, which can require surgical repair, and intervertebral disc disease, a spinal problem that can make movement painful and may require surgical repair.

Sites like Petfinder.com and Adopt-a-Pet.com can have you searching for a Beagle in your area in no time flat. The site allows you to be very specific in your requests (housetraining status, for example) or very general (all the Beagles available on Petfinder across the country). AnimalShelter can help you find animal rescue groups in your area. Also some local newspapers have “pets looking for homes” sections you can review.
Despite the many endearing qualities of the Chihuahua, if you’re thinking his tiny size makes him a great choice for children, you’d better think again. The Chihuahua may be just right for traveling around in a puppy purse, but he’s far too small and fragile for even the gentlest of children's games. Chihuahuas also tend to be high-strung and prone to nipping, snapping and even biting when frightened or threatened, or when defending his people or territory.
The tricolored beagle—white with large black areas and light brown shading—is the most common. Tricolored beagles occur in a number of shades, from the "Classic Tri" with a jet black saddle (also known as "Blackback"), to the "Dark Tri" (where faint brown markings are intermingled with more prominent black markings), to the "Faded Tri" (where faint black markings are intermingled with more prominent brown markings). Some tricolored dogs have a broken pattern, sometimes referred to as pied. These dogs have mostly white coats with patches of black and brown hair. Tricolor beagles are almost always born black and white. The white areas are typically set by eight weeks, but the black areas may fade to brown as the puppy matures. (The brown may take between one and two years to fully develop.) Some beagles gradually change color during their lives, and may lose their black markings entirely.
Alongside the Bloodhound and Basset Hound, the beagle has one of the best developed senses of smell of any dog.[35] In the 1950s, John Paul Scott and John Fuller began a 13-year study of canine behavior. As part of this research, they tested the scenting abilities of various breeds by putting a mouse in a one-acre field and timing how long it took the dogs to find it. The beagles found it in less than a minute, while Fox Terriers took 15 minutes and Scottish Terriers failed to find it at all. Beagles are better at ground-scenting (following a trail on the ground) than they are at air-scenting, and for this reason they have been excluded from most mountain rescue teams in favor of collies, which use sight in addition to air-scenting and are more biddable.[35] The long ears and large lips of the beagle probably assist in trapping the scents close to the nose.[36]

There is also the issue of puppy mills that supply many pet stores. These are commercial breeding facilities that prioritize profit over decent treatment of dogs. The reprehensible conditions at many of these facilities result in traumatized dogs that have numerous health and behavior issues. By avoiding purchasing a dog originating from a puppy mill, you are voting with your pocketbook and not supporting these practices.
According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, "owners of pit bull-type dogs deal with a strong breed stigma; however, controlled studies have not identified this breed group as disproportionately dangerous."[1] Because owners of stigmatized breeds are more likely to have involvement in criminal or violent acts, breed correlations may have the owner's behavior as the underlying causal factor.[1] Some jurisdictions have enacted legislation banning the group of breeds, and some insurance companies do not cover liability from pit bull bites. Among other roles, pit bulls have served as police dogs, search and rescue dogs, and several have appeared on film.
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