The Chihuahua is a lively dog that nonetheless can get his exercise running from room to room indoors. He enjoys exploring the yard or going for a short walk on leash and especially enjoys accompanying his owner on outings. He hates the cold and seeks out warmth. Coat care for the smooth is minimal. Care of the long coat entails brushing two to three times a week.

In the United States they appear to have been employed chiefly for hunting rabbits from the earliest imports. Hunting hare with beagles became popular again in Britain in the mid-19th century and continued until it was made illegal in Scotland by the Protection of Wild Mammals (Scotland) Act 2002 and in England and Wales by the Hunting Act 2004. Under this legislation beagles may still pursue rabbits with the landowner's permission. Drag hunting is popular where hunting is no longer permitted or for those owners who do not wish to participate in hunting a live animal, but still wish to exercise their dog's innate skills.

Leaping from your arms. Some Chihuahuas melt into your arms and stay there, but many are wriggly. They can be deceptive about it, too, apparently settling into your arms with contentment, then suddenly launching themselves through the air if you relax your grip. A fall from a few feet up, especially over a hard surface, can result in a broken leg or concussion. Hold on tight if you pick up a Chihuahua over concrete.
The beagle has an even temper and gentle disposition. Described in several breed standards as "merry", they are amiable and typically neither aggressive nor timid, although this depends on the individual. They enjoy company, and although they may initially be standoffish with strangers, they are easily won over. They make poor guard dogs for this reason, although their tendency to bark or howl when confronted with the unfamiliar makes them good watch dogs. In a 1985 study conducted by Ben and Lynette Hart, the beagle was given the highest excitability rating, along with the Yorkshire Terrier, Cairn Terrier, Miniature Schnauzer, West Highland White Terrier, and Fox Terrier.[41][c]
The Beagle is a medium-sized breed belonging to the hound sporting group. Though many variations of this breed have existed throughout history, the modern breed emerged in England in the early 1800s. The Beagle is a popular choice for pet owners because of its size and calm temperament, and is useful for hunters because of its sharp sense of smell.
Two-color varieties always have a white base color with areas of the second color. Tan and white is the most common two-color variety, but there is a wide range of other colors including lemon, a very light tan; red, a reddish, almost orange, brown; and liver, a darker brown, and black. Liver is not common and is not permitted in some standards; it tends to occur with yellow eyes. Ticked or mottled varieties may be either white or black with different colored flecks (ticking), such as the blue-mottled or bluetick beagle, which has spots that appear to be a midnight-blue color, similar to the coloring of the Bluetick Coonhound. Some tricolor beagles also have ticking of various colors in their white areas.[33][34]
Owners of a Maltese Terrier mix should also make a concerted effort to socialize their pet, especially within its first 14 weeks of life. This will help your Morkie learn to interact with other dogs and people and ensure that it doesn’t become too attached to you. Socialization will also help curb your dog’s separation anxiety and control their excessive barking.
What you are describing is my RatCha to a ‘T’. I swore as I was reading your post I thought I was reading the bio for my babygirl. Such an amazing dog. Only thing for me is I got her as a second hand dog on her way to a shelter, so potty training was never done, nor was she trained at all. So getting her when she was about a year and a half meant that she is pretty much puppy pad trained for life, and sometimes rugs and beds. I know she knows no better, and I have to be vigilant about taking her out. But is she is so shy she wont go potty on a leash. Mine barks a lot as well, but only at things that move outside and sounds that are not in visual range XD. But I will say I wont train her against doing it as it alerts me to everyones presence and that is very useful in a home intruder situation. Anyways. I couldn’t have asked for a kinder, more loving dog, even if she is a littler nervous most of the time.

So I am the owner of my first small dog. I have always had dobermans or Shepard’s growing up. To be honest – I hate to admit I viewed small dogs as “girl dogs” and as annoying. I know how that sounds – trust me. At a construction site job in the middle of Ocala right after I lost everything to my fiance I found cheating on me and had my entire savings of 22 grand stolen from m and all 14 of my credit accounts ran into the ground taking me from a 750 to 450 credit score – I found an abandoned dog with no chip – not spayed – nothing. I was sleeping in my truck at the time or in friends couches. I took he with the intent of finding her a home but oddly I was the only one she would come to or have anything to do with. I actually was immediately taken by her facial expressions to be honest. About a week later I found a place to rent temporarily . Then I used money to get her spade and her shots and vaccinations an microchipped using my parents address in Las Vegas as well as their phone number. I never planned on keeping her so I called her Baby Girl – turns out she was only 6 months old. Now we live in Vegas – long story short and she is a little over a year old now an honestly I ant imagine a day without her. We had to sleep in my 68 Chevy pick up at times, and I had to spend my food money to make sure she ate and on more motels than I could afford to keep her out of the blazing heat – but we made it work – and now we are in an apartment in Vegas Andi am finally going back to school for sports medicine. To be honest this little family member saved my life as I was on the brink of suicide a couple of times. And the name Baby girl just stuck. I’ve had to learn alot about how to care for something so small as her weight is all of 11 pounds – most times my fears revolve around injuring her an have taken quite a few falls on my arse after almost stepping on her or her foot as to not put full weight on her, but I’m learning fast. So yeah – it a great breed and we are quite the odd couple. So If anyone ever spots a 6 foot covered in tattoos white guy carrying a tiny wire haired terrier chihuahau mix (with a little mohawk on her head thank you very much) say hi – cause that’s us – lol. Don’t know how it happened but it did – not to mention……. Now I’m trying to find another of the same mix to be her companion when I start full time classes so she won’t be lonely being at home alone while I am in school!!! WTF! Yup – I’m that guy now. And it’s worth every minute –
^ Pedro Baptista Pino y Juan Lopez Cancelada, Exposición sucinta y sencilla de la Provincia del Nuevo México y otros escritos. Ed. Jesus Paniagua Perez. Valladolid: Junta de Castilla / León: Universidad de León, 2007, p. 244: "even in the desert the tiny dogs could be found, hunting rats, mice, and lizards. " The footnote that follows alludes to starving Conquistadores reportedly hunting and stewing the dogs (Universidad Veracruzana, Arquivo Viejo, XXVI.2711).
The Chihuahua's history is convoluted, and many theories surround the origin of the breed. Both folklore and archaeological finds show that the breed has origins in Mexico. The most common theory is that Chihuahua are descended from the Techichi, a companion dog favored by the Toltec civilization in Mexico.[2] No records of the Techichi are available before the 9th century, although dog pots from Colima, Mexico, buried as part of the western Mexico shaft tomb tradition, which date back to 300 BC, are thought to depict Techichis.[3] The earlier ancestors probably were present before the Mayas as dogs approximating the Chihuahua are found in materials from the Great Pyramid of Cholula, antedating 1530 and in the ruins of Chichen Itza on the Yucatán Peninsula.[2] However, a genetic study indicated that there was less than 2 percent pre-European mitochondrial DNA in modern Chihuahuas due to admixture with the European dogs.[4]
They were brought to exterminate vermin in those days. Breeds like the Yorkshire Terrier, Skye Terrier, and Irish Terrier were also crossed while developing this breed. These dogs were majorly used as watchdogs, and sometimes, to help control rodents in the gold mines, waterfronts, and on the sheep stations. It is a fast, brave, weather-resistant breed, which will adapt to any living conditions.
There are two varieties of Chihuahua recognised by the AKC– the Smooth Coat (short haired) and the Long Coat (long haired). Both the Smooth and the Long Coats have their special attractions and are equally easy to keep clean and well groomed.[12] The UK Kennel Club considers the two as distinct breeds; mating between the two are not eligible for KC registration.
Reality: This is a stereotype that is biased toward generalizing and condemning an entire breed based on the actions of a few bad people. The truth is that each dog should be evaluated by his own merits and not by his breed. A corollary truth is that there truly are no bad dogs, only bad people. In his essay Troublemakers, Malcolm Gladwell discusses what Pit Bull stereotypes can teach us about the wrongness of racial profiling of both humans and dogs.
The smallest breed of dog, the Chihuahua has a controversial history. One theory holds that it originated in China and was brought to the New World by Spanish traders, where it was then crossed with small native dogs. The other theory contends that it originated entirely in Central and South America, descending from the native Techichi. A small red dog was believed to guide the soul to the underworld, and every Aztec family kept such a dog that was buried with any deceased family member. To make matters worse for the Techichi, the Toltecs and their conquerors, the Aztecs, often ate dogs and the Techichi may have sometimes been on the menu. Despite what may have been short lives, the Techichis apparently were well cared for during life by the priests or their families. In fact, the most likely origin of the Chihuahua is a combination of these theories: the native Techichi was probably crossed with tiny hairless Chinese dogs, but again the date when this occurred is controversial.
All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit a particular disease. Run, don’t walk, from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee on puppies, who tells you that the breed is 100 percent healthy and has no known problems, or who tells you that her puppies are isolated from the main part of the household for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur in her lines. Here’s a brief rundown on what you should know about the Chihuahua’s health.
Another myth about Pit Bull type dogs is that they have a locked jaw which is impossible to break. While many of these dogs do indeed have a strong bite, it is a myth that their jaw locks. It can be broken using a bite stick or by some of the other ways mentioned in our article on breaking a Pit Bull's bite. Another important factor in Pit Bulls is the tendency to dock their tails and ears which makes it more difficult to recognize the signs of aggression in these dogs.

The largest state in Mexico, Chihuahua is headquarters for the world’s fifth largest oil company, Pertróleos Mexicanos. It is also where one of the smallest canine breeds, the Chihuahua, originated. After railroad travel to the Copper Canyon area was upgraded following privatization of the railroad in 1998, tourism became an important and growing segment of the economy. Attractions include the beautiful Copper Canyon region and Pancho Villa’s mansion.
Although Chihuahuas are prized for their small size, they're often fed to obesity. A Chihuahua's skeleton is not designed to carry much weight, and even a few extra ounces can be a significant burden to a dog this size. As with all dogs, leanness is far healthier – and cheaper, when it comes to veterinary costs. Keeping a Chihuahua lean is particularly important if he has luxating patellas.
Two-color varieties always have a white base color with areas of the second color. Tan and white is the most common two-color variety, but there is a wide range of other colors including lemon, a very light tan; red, a reddish, almost orange, brown; and liver, a darker brown, and black. Liver is not common and is not permitted in some standards; it tends to occur with yellow eyes. Ticked or mottled varieties may be either white or black with different colored flecks (ticking), such as the blue-mottled or bluetick beagle, which has spots that appear to be a midnight-blue color, similar to the coloring of the Bluetick Coonhound. Some tricolor beagles also have ticking of various colors in their white areas.[33][34]
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