Due to their athleticism and diverse breeding background, the Pit Bull breed tends to be hardy, with an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, longer than many breeds of a similar size. There are some genetic conditions to be watchful for. The Pit Bull tends to suffer from bone diseases such as hip dysplasia, degenerative myelopathy and kneecap dislocation. The Pit Bull can also suffer from skin problems, such as mange and skin allergies, because of its short coat. Other health ailments seen in Pit Bulls include thyroid and congenital heart defects.
In several entries you will see that the dog was originally bred for fighting. In noting this, we are simply highlighting the motive for its creation. In no case does this determine the behavior of an individual Pit Bull and under no circumstances does it mean every dog is intended solely for this purpose. All dogs deserve a home with caring and responsible owners willing to meet all their needs. Obviously, clandestine dog fighting is an intolerable practice.
As hunting with beagles was seen as ideal for young people, many of the British public schools traditionally maintained beagle packs. Protests were lodged against Eton's use of beagles for hunting as early as 1902 but the pack is still in existence today,[60] and a pack used by Imperial College in Wye, Kent was stolen by the Animal Liberation Front in 2001.[61] School and university packs are still maintained by Eton, Marlborough, Wye, Radley, the Royal Agricultural University and Christ Church, Oxford.[62]

In an effort to counter the fighting reputation of pit bull-type dogs, in 1996 the San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals renamed pit bull terriers "St. Francis Terriers", so that people might be more likely to adopt them.[17] 60 temperament-screened dogs were adopted until the program was halted, after several of the newly adopted pit bulls killed cats.[18] The New York City Center for Animal Care and Control tried a similar approach in 2004, relabeling their pit bulls as "New Yorkies", but dropped the idea in the face of overwhelming public opposition.[19][20]
In the Mexican War of Independence, Chihuahua hacienda owners and miners sided with the royalist forces against the independence movement. However, Mexico’s independence in 1821 forced leaders in Chihuahua to join the new country. The 1821 Plan of Iguala established the framework that consolidated the new republic; later, the region of Durango separated from Chihuahua and became an autonomous province. Chihuahua officially became a Mexican state in 1824; the state constitution was ratified the following year.
According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, "owners of pit bull-type dogs deal with a strong breed stigma; however, controlled studies have not identified this breed group as disproportionately dangerous."[1] Because owners of stigmatized breeds are more likely to have involvement in criminal or violent acts, breed correlations may have the owner's behavior as the underlying causal factor.[1] Some jurisdictions have enacted legislation banning the group of breeds, and some insurance companies do not cover liability from pit bull bites. Among other roles, pit bulls have served as police dogs, search and rescue dogs, and several have appeared on film.
Dog effigy pots dating to around 1325 AD discovered in Georgia and Tennessee also appear to represent the Chihuahua.[6] In 1850, a pot featuring the Chihuahua-like dogs was unearthed in old ruins at Casas Grandes in the Mexican state of Chihuahua, which dates from 1100–1300 AD showing the long history of such dogs at this site,[5] although most artifacts relating to its existence are found around Mexico City. It has been argued that these pots arrived with survivors from the Casas Grandes site in Chihuahua, Mexico, after it was attacked and destroyed around 1340 AD.
Seizure disorders, hypothyroidism, diabetes, cataracts and allergies may also be seen in the breed. Less common breed-related conditions include deafness, heart disease and dwarfism. Avoid breeders who try to sell you a puppy with dwarfism by marketing him as a “rare pocket Beagle.” Dwarf Beagles often have physical deformities such as a shortened neck, crooked legs or a broader skull and are often more prone to chronic arthritis.

Whether you’re planning to get your new best friend from a breeder, a pet store, or another source, don’t forget that old adage “let the buyer beware”. Disreputable breeders and facilities that deal with puppy mills can be hard to distinguish from reliable operations. There’s no 100% guaranteed way to make sure you’ll never purchase a sick puppy, but researching the breed (so you know what to expect), checking out the facility (to identify unhealthy conditions or sick animals), and asking the right questions can reduce the chances of heading into a disastrous situation. And don’t forget to ask your veterinarian, who can often refer you to a reputable breeder, breed rescue organization, or other reliable source for healthy puppies.  
Beagles are intelligent but, as a result of being bred for the long chase, are single-minded and determined, which can make them hard to train. They can be difficult to recall once they have picked up a scent, and are easily distracted by smells around them. They do not generally feature in obedience trials; while they are alert, respond well to food-reward training, and are eager to please, they are easily bored or distracted. They are ranked 72nd in Stanley Coren's The Intelligence of Dogs, as Coren places them among the group with the lowest degree of working/obedience intelligence. Coren's scale, however, does not assess understanding, independence, or creativity.[42][43]

On the other hand, Cairn Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier, and Welsh Terrier are small-sized dogs that are very warm and cute. But at the same time, they are intelligent, bright, tenacious, and fearless, irrespective of their size and shape. They can be friendly with people, if they are socialized properly. It is highly important that these dogs go through proper obedience training. 
My husband and I own a male wired haired terrier, we were told he is chiweenie, pom mix. he looks very much like a wired fox terrier. We are living with a couple that own a female chihuahua and now we are proud grand parents of 3 little puppies born on the 19th of January. 2 male, 1 female. I think I will be keeping the female. Junior (the dad – our dog), is a delightful little guy – definitely a mans dog – goes everywhere with my husband. I’m hoping for this little girl to be my loving little companion. Excited but not looking forward to the training period. It’s a short term effort with long term rewards if done in the correct manner. Praying for patience and strength! I can’t come up with her name yet – calling her Baby Girl – but….. any suggestions?
Chihuahuas are saucy and alert, with a mind of their own. They might not be able to talk, but that doesn’t prevent them from letting you know exactly what they want: usually plenty of quality time with their favorite person. Chihuahuas are often devoted to a particular person in the family and can even become obsessive about their desire to be with them and protect them. There’s a name for those dogs: “armpit piranhas.” If they’re being held and someone approaches the person holding them, the Chihuahua will make every effort to protect his person, whether it’s necessary or not.
How do Chihuahuas get along with dogs outside their own family? Often not well. Chihuahuas often raise a ruckus when they spy a strange dog, especially a larger dog. It's as though the Chihuahua wants to convince the larger dog that he is a force to reckon with rather than a helpless prey animal. The Chihuahua may be seeking to protect itself by putting up a blustering facade that tells the other dog to "move along."

In addition to organized beagling, beagles have been used for hunting or flushing to guns (often in pairs) a wide range of game including snowshoe hare, cottontail rabbits, game birds, roe deer, red deer, bobcat, coyote, wild boar and foxes, and have even been recorded as being used to hunt stoat.[63][64] In most of these cases, the beagle is employed as a gun dog, flushing game for hunter's guns.[63]


Some dog experts say they were among the first native dogs of the Americas, others that they were brought to the New World after the Spanish conquest of Mexico. Still others believe the little dogs may have originated as miniaturized versions of pariah dogs, the nondescript brown dogs with prick ears that result when dogs are left to breed on their own with no selection for color or other specific characteristics. Whatever the case, the breed takes its name from the state of Chihuahua, where late-19th-century American tourists first encountered the tiny canines.
Not all of these conditions are detectable in a growing puppy, and it is impossible to predict whether an animal will be free of these maladies, which is why you must find a reputable breeder who is committed to breeding the healthiest animals possible.  They should be able to produce independent certification that the parents of the dog (and grandparents, etc.) have been screened for common defects and deemed healthy for breeding. That’s where health registries come in.
The Beagle should do well on a high-quality dog food, whether commercially manufactured or home-prepared with your veterinarian’s supervision and approval. Any diet should be appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior). Some dogs are prone to getting overweight, so watch your dog’s calorie consumption and weight level. Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.
In a 1520 letter, Hernan Cortés wrote that the Aztecs raised and sold the little dogs as food.[7] Colonial records refer to small, nearly hairless dogs at the beginning of the 19th century, one of which claims 16th-century Conquistadores found them plentiful in the region later known as Chihuahua.[8] Small dogs such as Chihuahuas were also used as living heating pads during illness or injury. Some believe this practice is where the idea of pain being transferred to animals from humans originated, which gave way to rituals such as burning the deceased with live dogs, such as the Techichi, to exonerate the deceased human's sins.[9] Chihuahuas as we know them today remained a rarity until the early 20th century; the American Kennel Club (AKC) did not register a Chihuahua until 1904.[10]

Unfortunately, it is very difficult to discuss Pit Bulls without people using their emotional response rather than looking at the reasons behind dog attacks and what can prevent them. With such large muscular dogs, it is understandable that people may be intimidated. However, we do not have the same stigma against Siberian Huskies which we appropriately consider adorable dogs, despite the fact that they contribute to the greatest number of dog attack fatalities in the parts of Canada where they are most common. Population numbers are often ignored by those who want to unfairly vilify Pit Bulls. The importance of population is pointed out in a study by the American Veterinary Medical Association which concludes that breed is ‘a poor sole predictor of aggressiveness and pit bull-type dogs are not implicated in controlled studies’[5].
Dogs termed pit bulls share similar physical characteristics, but the morphological variation among bully breed dogs makes it difficult for even experts to visually identify them as distinct.[24][25][26] While mixed-breed dogs are often labeled as pit bulls if they have certain physical characteristics, such as a square-shaped head or bulky body type,[27] visual identification of mixed-breed dogs is not recommended by the scholarly community.[24] Some of the breeds which often get mistaken for pit bulls (but which are not genetically pit bulls) include the Cane Corso, Dogo Argentino, Dogue de Bordeaux, and others, but because these breeds did not originate with the crossbreeding of bulldogs and terriers, they do not fall under the term "pit bull".[28][29]
Beagles are excellent with children and this is one of the reasons they have become popular family pets. But as beagles are pack animals, they are prone to separation anxiety,[44] a condition which causes them to destroy things when left unattended. Not all beagles will howl, but most will bark when confronted with strange situations, and some will bay (also referred to as "speaking", "giving tongue", or "opening") when they catch the scent of potential quarry.[45] They also generally get along well with cats and other dogs. They are not too demanding with regard to exercise; their inbred stamina means they do not easily tire when exercised, but they also do not need to be worked to exhaustion before they will rest. Regular exercise helps ward off the weight gain to which the breed is prone.[46]
Feisty is the word most often used to describe terriers. From the Latin terra, for earth, most terriers were originally bred to "go to ground" after burrowing vermin, larger rodents and even foxes. These fiery little dynamos would dig up underground dens and burrows while barking furiously, forcing the inhabitants out where hunters awaited. Some breeds were even bred to finish the job themselves. Let loose in your backyard, a terrier can build an entire golf course in a day — the 18 holes at least. Too large to go to ground, the popular Airedale terrier puts its strength and stubborn streak to use as a surprisingly ferocious watchdog. Like most terriers, this "king of terriers" has little time for other dogs, and if not properly supervised may engage in some street brawling. If it weren't for the fact that most terriers, such as the Cairn and the Norfolk, are fairly small, their tenacious nature and boundless energy would make them hard to control. Due to some unscrupulous breeders and unmindful owners, a few breeds within the terrier group have developed rather notorious reputations. The crossing of bulldogs and terriers for the express purpose of creating fighting dogs has produced several dog breeds that can be dangerous in the wrong hands. Combining the taut muscles and compact power of the bulldog with the tenacity and aggressiveness of the terrier, some controversial bull terrier breeds have been involved in some highly publicized biting incidents, several involving small children. When these dogs bite, they don't let go. Unfortunately, these incidents tarnish the reputations of what can be friendly, stable, even calm pets. But without the right training and socialization, and in irresponsible hands, these can be dangerous dogs.
Seizure disorders, hypothyroidism, diabetes, cataracts and allergies may also be seen in the breed. Less common breed-related conditions include deafness, heart disease and dwarfism. Avoid breeders who try to sell you a puppy with dwarfism by marketing him as a “rare pocket Beagle.” Dwarf Beagles often have physical deformities such as a shortened neck, crooked legs or a broader skull and are often more prone to chronic arthritis.
By the fourteenth century, hare-hunting had become a popular sport in England, and the dogs used were probably of Beagle type. The origin of the name Beagle may be from old French words meaning open throat in reference to the breed’s melodious bay, or from the Celtic, old English, or old French words for small. The word Beagle was not used until 1475, however, but can then be found frequently in writings from the sixteenth century on.

Throughout the 16th century, the first Spanish settlements were established around haciendas (country estates) and mining operations. Some Franciscan missions and Carapoa villages were also founded in the mid-1500s. Although the military garrisons at El Paso and Ciudad Juárez were both built in 1598, the Spanish colonizers exerted fairly loose control over the region during most of the 16th century.


The bull breeds are often grossly misunderstood. The qualities that make these dogs tenacious players in obedience and agility games also attract highly unscrupulous people looking for strong competitors for their dog fighting rings. The sorry result is that bull breeds, in particular the APBT, have gained a reputation over recent years for being dangerous.
I have a 10 year old rat terrier-chihuahua mix who is 17 pounds. He is the sweetest dog I have ever met. He loves people and follows me everywhere around the house. He sleeps most of the day but he needs a daily dose of playtime. The only negative is that he can get aggressive toward other dogs (especially big ones!). But other than that, he is such a sweet and loving companion.
Expect to spend about an hour a day walking, playing with or otherwise exercising this dog. While they love people, American Pit Bull Terriers are strong for their size and can be stubborn if left to their own devices. Begin obedience training early and continue it throughout the dog's life. Training is the foundation for a strong relationship with your American Pit Bull Terrier.
They aren't yappy dogs, but they do have three distinct vocalizations — a bark/growl, a baying howl, and a half-baying howl (a cross between a frantic bark and a bay). The half-howl vocalization usually is reserved for when they catch sight of quarry — or think it's time to wake the neighbors at 6 a.m.! Being pack dogs, they generally get along well with other animals and their human friends — and they think everyone is their new best friend.
My husband & I just last week adopted a 2 month old female chihuahua/terrier mix from a shelter. She’s brindle colored and was named “Sassy” by the shelter. We changed her name to “VITA”, which in Italian means life. Being as my husband is half Sicilian, he chose that name for her. And she is definitely full of life! Just the sweetest little pup. Good luck with yours 🙂
Networking can help you find a dog that may be the perfect companion for your family. Most people who love Chihuahuas love all Chihuahuas. That’s why breed clubs have rescue organizations devoted to taking care of homeless dogs. The Chihuahua Club of America’s rescue network can help you find a dog that may be the perfect companion for your family. You can also search online for other Chihuahua rescues in your area.
Chihuahuas are saucy and alert, with a mind of their own. They might not be able to talk, but that doesn’t prevent them from letting you know exactly what they want: usually plenty of quality time with their favorite person. Chihuahuas are often devoted to a particular person in the family and can even become obsessive about their desire to be with them and protect them. There’s a name for those dogs: “armpit piranhas.” If they’re being held and someone approaches the person holding them, the Chihuahua will make every effort to protect his person, whether it’s necessary or not.
Although it is tempting to carry these dainty creatures about, these are active little dogs that need a daily walk. Play can take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display a wide array of behavior problems, as well as neurotic issues. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard.
It’s so easy to fall in love with the Maltese Terrier mix. This dog is a genetic goldmine, having inherited the best traits of its parent breeds. It’s energetic, confident, intelligent, loving, and friendly. It takes so little to make this dog happy. Give it all your love and just the right amount of attention and it will be content. In return, you’ll get the sweetest dog around. However, it’s essential that your dog is also trained and socialized early to curb its negative traits, like anxiety and excessive barking.
Alongside the Bloodhound and Basset Hound, the beagle has one of the best developed senses of smell of any dog.[35] In the 1950s, John Paul Scott and John Fuller began a 13-year study of canine behavior. As part of this research, they tested the scenting abilities of various breeds by putting a mouse in a one-acre field and timing how long it took the dogs to find it. The beagles found it in less than a minute, while Fox Terriers took 15 minutes and Scottish Terriers failed to find it at all. Beagles are better at ground-scenting (following a trail on the ground) than they are at air-scenting, and for this reason they have been excluded from most mountain rescue teams in favor of collies, which use sight in addition to air-scenting and are more biddable.[35] The long ears and large lips of the beagle probably assist in trapping the scents close to the nose.[36]

The skull should be fairly long, slightly domed at occiput, with cranium broad and full. Ears-Ears set on moderately low, long, reaching when drawn out nearly, if not quite, to the end of the nose; fine in texture, fairly broad-with almost entire absence of erectile power-setting close to the head, with the forward edge slightly inturning to the cheek-rounded at tip. Eyes-Eyes large, set well apart-soft and houndlike-expression gentle and pleading; of a brown or hazel color. Muzzle-Muzzle of medium length-straight and square-cut-the stop moderately defined. Jaws-Level. Lips free from flews; nostrils large and open. Defects-A very flat skull, narrow across the top; excess of dome, eyes small, sharp and terrierlike, or prominent and protruding; muzzle long, snipy or cut away decidedly below the eyes, or very short. Roman-nosed, or upturned, giving a dish-face expression. Ears short, set on high or with a tendency to rise above the point of origin.
Thank you so much for this comment. Professionalism and warmth is part of what we aim for, so we appreciate when it gets recognized. Some contentious topics lead to understandable emotional responses, on both sides. We don't want to offend anyone's views, but our approach will be an unapologetically evidence-based one. Thanks again for your support.
Another myth about Pit Bull type dogs is that they have a locked jaw which is impossible to break. While many of these dogs do indeed have a strong bite, it is a myth that their jaw locks. It can be broken using a bite stick or by some of the other ways mentioned in our article on breaking a Pit Bull's bite. Another important factor in Pit Bulls is the tendency to dock their tails and ears which makes it more difficult to recognize the signs of aggression in these dogs.
The experiment was a huge success. Because they are small, friendly, and cute, the Beagles didn't intimidate people who are afraid of dogs, and with their super nose power, they could be trained to identify specific food articles while bypassing those that weren't contraband. Today, members of the "Beagle Brigade" patrol the baggage-claim areas at more than 20 international airports and other points of entry into the United States.

How a Chihuahua behaves depends on the genetic temperament of their parents and grandparents.[22] Their small size makes them delicate and vulnerable to injuries and attacks from larger animals. Like all dogs, they benefit from appropriate socialization and training.[23] Chihuahuas tend to learn better when being rewarded with a treat or positive reinforcement. With the proper training a Chihuahua needs this dog can be extremely intelligent. The way you train your dog will influence their behavior.[24]


The Pit Bull’s origins can be traced back to early 19th-century England, Ireland and Scotland. The canine’s ancestors were the result of experimentally crossbreeding different Bulldog and Terrier breeds for the purpose of bear- and bull-baiting, a blood sport in which the dog was trained to attack until the larger animal was defeated. When baiting was banned in the 1800s, the dogs were then bred for the sport of ratting and dog fighting. European immigrants introduced the Pit Bull breed to North America.


Chihuahuas can be easily frightened or provoked to attack, so are generally unsuitable for homes with small children.[25] The breed tends to be fiercely loyal to one particular person and in some cases may become overprotective of the person, especially around other people or animals,[25] and tend to have a "clannish" nature, often preferring the companionship of other Chihuahuas or Chihuahua mixes over other dogs.[26] These traits generally make them unsuitable for households with children who are not patient and calm.[19]
In several entries you will see that the dog was originally bred for fighting. In noting this, we are simply highlighting the motive for its creation. In no case does this determine the behavior of an individual Pit Bull and under no circumstances does it mean every dog is intended solely for this purpose. All dogs deserve a home with caring and responsible owners willing to meet all their needs. Obviously, clandestine dog fighting is an intolerable practice.
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