^ Patronek, Gary J., Sacks, Jeffrey J., Delise, Karen M., Cleary, Donald V., Marder, Amy R. (December 2013). "Co-occurrence of potentially preventable factors in 256 dog bite–related fatalities in the United States (2000–2009)". Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 243 (#12): 1726–1736. doi:10.2460/javma.243.12.1726. PMID 24299544.
The Beagle originated in England. His heritage stretches back to the packs of hunting hounds kept by landed gentry to hunt deer and hare. Beagle-like scenthounds were known as far back as 1475, when the word “Beagle” was first used to describe this type of hunting dog. It’s a matter of debate whether the name comes from a Celtic word meaning “small” or a French word meaning “open mouth” or “loud mouth.” Given the Beagle’s propensity for baying when he catches an interesting scent on the wind, the latter theory seems most likely.
Reverend Phillip Honeywood established a beagle pack in Essex in the 1830s and it is believed that this pack formed the basis for the modern breed. Although details of the pack's lineage are not recorded it is thought that North Country Beagles and Southern Hounds were strongly represented; William Youatt suspected that Harriers formed a good majority of the beagle's bloodline, but the origin of the Harrier is itself obscure.[5] Honeywood's Beagles were small, standing at about 10 inches (25 cm) at the shoulder, and pure white according to John Mills (writing in The Sportsman's Library in 1845). Prince Albert and Lord Winterton also had Beagle packs around this time, and royal favour no doubt led to some revival of interest in the breed, but Honeywood's pack was regarded as the finest of the three.[10]

Adolescent Beagles are full of energy and need a lot of opportunities to work it all off. They love to go for walks with their family, or, even better, a good run across a field to hunt down rabbits (not recommended unless you have trained your dog to come back to you). They'll enjoy jogging with you, but wait until they're 18 months or older before starting them on a repetitive exercise like this.


I have a male Chiweenie/terrier (probably Cairn) mix possibly with some Chinese crested. I rescued him when he was just a little over a year (a vets office was taking care of him so he was well socialized and loved there). He is the best dog I could every hope for. They had named him Foo Man Chu because of his beard but I named him Cooper. He is black with a little white on his feet. His underbelly has almost no hair. He is a great watch dog which I wanted since I work from home. He doesn’t bark unless he hears something. He loves everyone, literally, especially kids. I have made a point of showing the kids in my complex how to approach a small dog. Cooper loves to give kisses. When he sees someone he knows his tail wagging could knock you over and he only weighs 10 pounds. The only issues I have had are the allergies and the luxating patella. He starts to skip a little when he has done too much. Although he could play with his bff for hours, it can take him a couple of days to recover so I watch that. He loves to lay in his bed next to my computer and WATCH ME work. Of course he loves belly rubs. He rides in the car very well. He is 5 now and is my superdooperCooper!
The Kennel Club in the United Kingdom and the AKC in the United States recognize only two varieties of Chihuahua: the long coat and the smooth coat, also referred to as longhaired and shorthaired.[19] The term smooth coat does not mean that the hair is necessarily smooth, as the hair can range from having a velvet touch to a whiskery feel. Longhaired Chihuahuas are actually smoother to the touch, having soft, fine guard hairs and a downy undercoat, which gives them their fluffy appearance. Unlike many longhaired breeds, longhaired Chihuahuas require no trimming and minimal grooming. Contrary to popular belief, the longhaired breed also typically sheds less than its shorthaired counterparts. Up to three or more years may be needed before a full longhaired coat develops.
The word “beagle” is thought to have come from certain old French words meaning an open throat, a possible connection to the dog’s musical bay. It is also speculated that the dog’s name might have derived from old French, Celtic or English words meaning small. Beagle-like dogs were probably used for the popular sport of hare-hunting in England during the 1300s, but the term "beagle" was not used until 1475. Hunters would follow the dog on foot and sometimes even carry one in his pocket. There were several sizes of Beagles in the 1800s, but the pocket-size dogs were most popular. These small dogs measured only about nine inches and required the hunter's help while crossing rough fields. Because the smaller Beagles were slower and easier to follow on foot, they appealed especially to women, the elderly, and those who otherwise did not have the stamina or inclination to keep up with an active dog.
In 1916, five members of the National Beagle Club purchased 508 acres in Western Loudoun County, Virginia for the purpose of holding field trials. The men who purchased it formed a corporation called Institute Corporate to purchase and own the land, then leasing it to the Institute Foundation that maintains the property for the National Beagle Club, which today is the site of many activities of the National Beagle Club.

In addition to organized beagling, beagles have been used for hunting or flushing to guns (often in pairs) a wide range of game including snowshoe hare, cottontail rabbits, game birds, roe deer, red deer, bobcat, coyote, wild boar and foxes, and have even been recorded as being used to hunt stoat.[63][64] In most of these cases, the beagle is employed as a gun dog, flushing game for hunter's guns.[63]
Now, the actual amount of shedding depends on whether the coat is single or double. NOT on whether the coat is short or long, but whether it is double (outer coat plus undercoat) or single (just an outercoat). Remember we talked about single and double coats earlier. Whether a coat is short or long, the double coats shed more than the single coats. Which makes sense.
Not every Beagle visit to the vet is for a genetic problem. The Beagle’s long, floppy ears are prone to chronic ear infections. Left untreated, such infections can cause permanent damage to the ear canal and even destroy your dog's hearing. Checking ears often and seeing the veterinarian at the first whiff of a problem combined with good follow-through will keep a Beagle’s ears from being an expensive and painful problem.
These dogs are extremely intelligent and learn commands and tricks with ease. They have a zest for life and love to be involved in everything going on around them. They maintain a puppyish demeanor well into adulthood, and that vitality makes them a joy to live with. Once you have met and gotten to know this breed you will wonder how you ever lived without one.
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