Because Chihuahuas get cold easily they tend to love their dens and will often burrow themselves in pillows, clothes hampers, and blankets. They are often found under the covers or at the bottom of the bed, deep in the dark and safety of what they perceive as their den. Chihuahuas also enjoy time in sunlight.[27] Chihuahuas sometimes act like cats and climb up to the highest point on a couch, usually on top of the pillows, and curl up into a ball. Chihuahuas have their own type of personality. They tend to be alert. Chihuahuas typically do not show fear; even though they are a smaller breed, they do not view their size as a disadvantage. [28]
My rescue is Iggyboo, a cairn terrier/Chihuahua mix, weighing in at 10 lbs and only 8 inches tall, now at almost 3 yrs. He is very protective and loyal, and pretty much a lap dog. He loves to play with his toys, and is highly intelligent, often preferring his interactive toys over stuffed ones. I find myself constantly teaching him new words or playing new games. He hates children and often adults, but can warm up to people given a few minutes and a few kind words (treats help this process). He also can be a challenge to walk, being aggressive to other dogs, but responds very well to a clicker and a treat for distraction. So, generally I have had no issues with him on walks, but am always careful. He loves bedtime, and burrows under the covers, sleeping a full 8 hours straight, he gets upset if I roll over and wake him up and will growl at me, lol.
Developed from the Bull and Terrier types dogs, the American Pit Bull Terrier can be traced back to the early 1800s in what is now known as the United Kingdom. They were bred as an all-around farm dog, working the farms as a cattle/hog dog. Some chose to turn their talents into the sport of pit-fighting. The breed's tenacity and accompanying strength are unmatched in the canine world. As rich and captivating as the breed's history is, the Pit Bull's future is more worthy of commentary. Some proponents of the breed argue that this breed is the original bulldog of the past. Old prints and woodcarvings show reason to believe this. They show dogs that look exactly like the breed today, doing things the dog is still capable of doing. For more information on this theory you can read books by Richard F. Stratton. The APBT, as registered by the UKC, is an individual breed of dog and does not refer to just any ill-bred, mindless warrior-type mongrel. At one time, the Pit Bull had an all around reputation of a much loved, trustworthy companion. Unfortunately the breed has become a status symbol for many types of criminals who chose to train these dogs to fight. It is those types of people who are chiefly responsible for the banning and witch-hunting that has been sweeping the U.S. The media, however, should not go unmentioned, for it is also responsible for escalating isolated incidences in a relentless and attention-getting way. Most Pit Bulls are bred as family dogs or sports such as weight pulling, but the media will rarely mention this. They get more views pretending all Pit Bulls are bred by fighters. In a lot of cases when the media is reporting about a Pit Bull attacking, it is indeed not even a Pit Bull at all, but a mixed breed of some sort, or another bull breed all together. For example, there was a report on KYW news in Philadelphia about two Pit Bulls attacking a person. The dogs did not look like Pit Bulls, but rather Boxer mixes. The news station was called and asked if they knew the dogs were in fact purebred American Pit Bull Terriers, or another bull breed of some sort, or mutts, for that matter. They stated they did not know, and to call the police station to verify that information. They were asked how they could report something that they were not sure of. They had no answer and they were not sure of the dogs’ breeds. Even after admitting on the phone that they did not in fact know the breeds of the dogs in question, they kept calling the dogs Pit Bulls in their reports. Why? Because the name Pit Bull will draw out the most attention from the public. The Pit Bull's future has been perhaps irreparably undone and everyone is to blame except the dog itself. This very loyal dog is too set on pleasing his owner, and ironically this is the root of his own undoing. Accompanying this need to please are remarkable abilities of all kinds. Jack Dempsy, Teddy Roosevelt and Jack Johnson are just a few people who have owned Pit Bulls. Pit Bulls excel in practically every canine task including herding, guarding, hunting, policing, cart pulling and ratting. A Pit Bull named Banddog Dread holds more canine working titles than ANY other breed. The owner's name is Diane Jessup and you can reference her book "The Working Pit Bull." It tells all of Dread's accomplishments. These dogs are truly capable of many tasks. The difference between Pits and American Staffordshire Terriers is a difficult one. Even breeders can't agree. The main difference is the bloodline. Amstaffs are show dogs and dog fighters usually do not use dogs with Amstaff blood. As time progresses there will be more of a difference. Many are dual registered as Amstaffs with the AKC and Pits with the UKC.

"This is our 8-month-old, 4.5-lb. Chihuahua Tequila. We call her Tiqi as a nickname and we love her to death. She's very energetic and I'm glad to see your site lists that they should be walked daily. Lots of people think that because she's so little, she doesn't need it, but her behavior is so much better when she's been exercised. She's very social and believes that any person she sees is there for the sole benefit of petting her. She's never learned to bark, which is fine for us. She does well with other dogs and children and is very smart! We were able to teach her to sit, shake with both her right and left paws, and 'walk pretty' in one week! This is her getting ready for bed in her PJ's."


I have a male Chiweenie/terrier (probably Cairn) mix possibly with some Chinese crested. I rescued him when he was just a little over a year (a vets office was taking care of him so he was well socialized and loved there). He is the best dog I could every hope for. They had named him Foo Man Chu because of his beard but I named him Cooper. He is black with a little white on his feet. His underbelly has almost no hair. He is a great watch dog which I wanted since I work from home. He doesn’t bark unless he hears something. He loves everyone, literally, especially kids. I have made a point of showing the kids in my complex how to approach a small dog. Cooper loves to give kisses. When he sees someone he knows his tail wagging could knock you over and he only weighs 10 pounds. The only issues I have had are the allergies and the luxating patella. He starts to skip a little when he has done too much. Although he could play with his bff for hours, it can take him a couple of days to recover so I watch that. He loves to lay in his bed next to my computer and WATCH ME work. Of course he loves belly rubs. He rides in the car very well. He is 5 now and is my superdooperCooper!
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA): This is a degenerative eye disorder that eventually causes blindness from the loss of photoreceptors at the back of the eye. PRA is detectable years before the dog shows any signs of blindness. Fortunately, dogs can use their other senses to compensate for blindness, and a blind dog can live a full and happy life. Just don't make it a habit to move the furniture around. Reputable breeders have their dogs' eyes certified annually by a veterinary ophthalmologist and do not breed dogs with this disease.
Feisty is the word most often used to describe terriers. From the Latin terra, for earth, most terriers were originally bred to "go to ground" after burrowing vermin, larger rodents and even foxes. These fiery little dynamos would dig up underground dens and burrows while barking furiously, forcing the inhabitants out where hunters awaited. Some breeds were even bred to finish the job themselves. Let loose in your backyard, a terrier can build an entire golf course in a day — the 18 holes at least. Too large to go to ground, the popular Airedale terrier puts its strength and stubborn streak to use as a surprisingly ferocious watchdog. Like most terriers, this "king of terriers" has little time for other dogs, and if not properly supervised may engage in some street brawling. If it weren't for the fact that most terriers, such as the Cairn and the Norfolk, are fairly small, their tenacious nature and boundless energy would make them hard to control. Due to some unscrupulous breeders and unmindful owners, a few breeds within the terrier group have developed rather notorious reputations. The crossing of bulldogs and terriers for the express purpose of creating fighting dogs has produced several dog breeds that can be dangerous in the wrong hands. Combining the taut muscles and compact power of the bulldog with the tenacity and aggressiveness of the terrier, some controversial bull terrier breeds have been involved in some highly publicized biting incidents, several involving small children. When these dogs bite, they don't let go. Unfortunately, these incidents tarnish the reputations of what can be friendly, stable, even calm pets. But without the right training and socialization, and in irresponsible hands, these can be dangerous dogs.
Not every Beagle visit to the vet is for a genetic problem. The Beagle’s long, floppy ears are prone to chronic ear infections. Left untreated, such infections can cause permanent damage to the ear canal and even destroy your dog's hearing. Checking ears often and seeing the veterinarian at the first whiff of a problem combined with good follow-through will keep a Beagle’s ears from being an expensive and painful problem.
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