Chihuahuas can be easily frightened or provoked to attack, so are generally unsuitable for homes with small children.[25] The breed tends to be fiercely loyal to one particular person and in some cases may become overprotective of the person, especially around other people or animals,[25] and tend to have a "clannish" nature, often preferring the companionship of other Chihuahuas or Chihuahua mixes over other dogs.[26] These traits generally make them unsuitable for households with children who are not patient and calm.[19]
The history of the Chihuahua is quite controversial. According to one theory, it was originally developed in China and then brought to the Americas by Spanish traders, where it was interbred with small native dogs. Others speculate it is of South and Central American origin, descended from a small, mute dog -- the native Techichi -- which was occasionally sacrificed in Toltec religious rites. It was believed that this diminutive red dog guided the soul to the underworld after death. Thus, all Aztec families kept this dog and buried it with the deceased member of the family. (Curiously, the Toltecs and the Aztecs also fed on the Techichi.) When not used in burial rituals, however, the Aztec and Toltec priests and families took great care of the Techichis.
How a Chihuahua behaves depends on the genetic temperament of their parents and grandparents.[22] Their small size makes them delicate and vulnerable to injuries and attacks from larger animals. Like all dogs, they benefit from appropriate socialization and training.[23] Chihuahuas tend to learn better when being rewarded with a treat or positive reinforcement. With the proper training a Chihuahua needs this dog can be extremely intelligent. The way you train your dog will influence their behavior.[24]
Thank you for the amazing article, filled with great and interesting information! I love such a clear-minded and healthy approach, where one can simply see that people truly know what they're talking about. Too often, as in negative myths, people write "oh they're just wonderful". Which is true!, but, it is better to be educated and have strong facts behind the statement so one can have a trustful argument when speaking – and to really show the people what is TRUE, not a personal opinion – be it in a positive or negative context.
We own a 10 lb chi/terrier mix who has some serious itchy under belly hair loss going on. She has tested negative for allergies and has been on hydrolyzed food now for a month with no changes to her hair loss. She also takes appoquel daily. Along with this, she will randomly pee in the house. She seems like a very bright dog, so this trait is very frustrating. Not sure what the next step will be but would appreciate hearing from others in this situation.

By the fourteenth century, hare-hunting had become a popular sport in England, and the dogs used were probably of Beagle type. The origin of the name Beagle may be from old French words meaning open throat in reference to the breed’s melodious bay, or from the Celtic, old English, or old French words for small. The word Beagle was not used until 1475, however, but can then be found frequently in writings from the sixteenth century on.
Currently, there are a number of breeds that are recognized by different associations which fall under the term "pit bull". The Federation Cynologique Internationale currently only recognizes three breeds: the Bull Terrier, the Miniature Bull Terrier, and the Staffordshire Bull Terrier.[21] The Canadian Kennel Club also recognizes these breeds, as well as the American Staffordshire Terrier.[22] The American Kennel Club recognizes the Bull Terrier, the Miniature Bull Terrier, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier and the American Staffordshire Terrier as breeds also.[23]
Although credited with the development of the modern breed, Honeywood concentrated on producing dogs for hunting and it was left to Thomas Johnson to refine the breeding to produce dogs that were both attractive and capable hunters. Two strains were developed: the rough- and smooth-coated varieties. The rough-coated beagle survived until the beginning of the 20th century, and there were even records of one making an appearance at a dog show as late as 1969, but this variety is now extinct, having probably been absorbed into the standard beagle bloodline.[11]

These dogs are extremely intelligent and learn commands and tricks with ease. They have a zest for life and love to be involved in everything going on around them. They maintain a puppyish demeanor well into adulthood, and that vitality makes them a joy to live with. Once you have met and gotten to know this breed you will wonder how you ever lived without one.

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