Terrier mix dogs are not very choosy when it comes to food. You can give them any commercial well-balanced dog food. It is better to avoid foods with wheat and corn. You can give them bones or raw meat or any kind of poultry meal. But make sure not to overfeed these dogs and get them into the habit of eating at fixed times. Dry food is preferable for terrier mix dogs. But wet food can be given twice or thrice a week.
Seizure disorders, hypothyroidism, diabetes, cataracts and allergies may also be seen in the breed. Less common breed-related conditions include deafness, heart disease and dwarfism. Avoid breeders who try to sell you a puppy with dwarfism by marketing him as a “rare pocket Beagle.” Dwarf Beagles often have physical deformities such as a shortened neck, crooked legs or a broader skull and are often more prone to chronic arthritis.
On the other hand, Cairn Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier, and Welsh Terrier are small-sized dogs that are very warm and cute. But at the same time, they are intelligent, bright, tenacious, and fearless, irrespective of their size and shape. They can be friendly with people, if they are socialized properly. It is highly important that these dogs go through proper obedience training. 
Robin Rock is the founder and director of Measle’s Animal Haven Pit Bull Rescue, a 501(c)(3) non-profit rescue and sanctuary consisting of foster homes in Central Ohio. Robin has been rescuing, rehabilitating and advocating for Pit Bulls for over 10 years, and she has worked with thousands of Pit Bulls. She lives with her husband Joe, their five children, adopted dogs and cats and various foster dogs.
The longcoated Chihuahua is the product of a recessive gene, meaning a puppy must have the gene from both parents for the long coat to express itself, so he isn’t seen in litters as frequently as the smooth. The long, soft coat is flat or slightly curly, and the dog has a ruff around the neck, fringed ears, feathering on the legs and a plumed tail. The hair on the rest of the body is almost as smooth as that on the smooth Chihuahua. Longcoated Chihuahuas are beautiful, and they’re easy to groom, but they do shed seasonally.
Tiny dogs often come with big health problems, and the Chihuahua is no exception. Many Chihuahuas live long, healthy lives, but conditions seen in the breed include breathing difficulties caused by a windpipe that collapses in on itself; luxating patellas; eye disorders; congestive heart disease; certain neurological conditions including hydrocephalus (fluid buildup in and around the brain), neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, a condition in which fatty pigments in the brain cause the progressive loss of brain function, and atlantoaxial subluxation, a neck deformity that may require surgical correction; obesity; and dental problems caused by the small size of their mouths. 
In a 1520 letter, Hernan Cortés wrote that the Aztecs raised and sold the little dogs as food.[7] Colonial records refer to small, nearly hairless dogs at the beginning of the 19th century, one of which claims 16th-century Conquistadores found them plentiful in the region later known as Chihuahua.[8] Small dogs such as Chihuahuas were also used as living heating pads during illness or injury. Some believe this practice is where the idea of pain being transferred to animals from humans originated, which gave way to rituals such as burning the deceased with live dogs, such as the Techichi, to exonerate the deceased human's sins.[9] Chihuahuas as we know them today remained a rarity until the early 20th century; the American Kennel Club (AKC) did not register a Chihuahua until 1904.[10]
With the mining industry growing steadily into the 17th century, Chihuahua was named the capital of the province of Nueva Vizcaya. From 1640 to 1731, the area experienced increased economic activity and, concomitantly, frequent indigenous uprisings. Tensions developed between the miners and the hacienda owners who continued to force indigenous groups into slavery.
By 1887 the threat of extinction was on the wane: there were 18 beagle packs in England.[14] The Beagle Club was formed in 1890 and the first standard drawn up at the same time.[15] The following year the Association of Masters of Harriers and Beagles was formed. Both organisations aimed to further the best interests of the breed, and both were keen to produce a standard type of beagle.[16] By 1902, the number of packs had risen to 44.[14]

How do Chihuahuas get along with dogs outside their own family? Often not well. Chihuahuas often raise a ruckus when they spy a strange dog, especially a larger dog. It's as though the Chihuahua wants to convince the larger dog that he is a force to reckon with rather than a helpless prey animal. The Chihuahua may be seeking to protect itself by putting up a blustering facade that tells the other dog to "move along."

"These are our Chi babies, from left: Maxwell (6 months), Milo (9 months) and Matilda (also 9 months). While Milo and Matilda are on the bigger side of the Chi scale at 7 and 9 lbs., Maxwell is on the more average size at about 4½ lbs. Milo is a bit more on the lazy side compared to the other two and sometimes will just sit and watch the others play. He is also a bit insecure which we are working on with him. They are all very loving however and are always anxious to share kisses with their humans and with each other alike. Sometimes they'll lie in the sun bathing each other’s faces and making sure they are all looking their best. Then they will burrow in blankets, pillows, etc. until they fluff it up just enough to get comfortable and then proceed to take a long nap. While none of them are the "alpha" (that's the humans job, isn't it?!) our female, Matilda is by far the most bossy out of the group. If she wants to play, you'd better play or else you'll get a "donkey kick" until she gets a reaction. Typical female! (and yes, I can say that because I AM a female! :o)
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