This breed requires expert veterinary attention in areas such as birthing and dental care. Dental care is a must for these small dogs, whose jaw size makes for weaker teeth. Although daily brushing provides the best preventive measure, feeding a dental diet or using dental chews for dogs is an effective approach pet owners can take to help prevent and control accumulation of plaque and tartar to avoid consequences of severe periodontal disease.[36] The best physical characteristics of dog food to contribute to cleaning a dog's teeth would be food that is large and dense, so more time is spent chewing, which leads to the surface of the teeth being cleaned.
Generally there is a wide interpretation of what is called “breed”. Breeds are actually categorized by a functional type from which a breed has developed. The most of the breeds are traditional breeds with a very long history, who are registered. There are some rare breeds, who have also their own registries, but some new breeds are still under development. There are even a lot of dog breeds, who are in danger to extinct. There are a few cases, where the origin of breed overlaps the frontier of two, three or more countries. As the general rule the dog is listed in the country in that he is most commonly associated, according to the FCI (Fédération Cynologique Internationale), by the designated country of the dog. There are some dogs, who have an uncertain origin, therefore they are getting classified under several countries.
I have a terrier maltese, I believe the terrier is parson or jack Russell. I disagree with the author with some of the notes negative traits. She is by far the best dog I have ever had! Better than every other dog I bring her around too. She flys with me on the plane, not a peep. Rides along for 8 hr drives, she loves to run around outside will play fetch, absolutely loves other dogs and especially kids. Very affectionate. And I’m not even really a dog lover but I fell in love with this one.
The ancestors to the Chihuahua nearly became extinct during the 1500s, when the Aztec Empire was decimated by Hernán Cortés and the Spanish colonizers. In 1850, three small dogs -- now thought to be modern versions of the Chihuahua -- were discovered in the Mexican state of Chihuahua, from which breed gets its name. Border states within the United States, such as Texas, Arizona and New Mexico, soon began to see a massive import of the dog breed. However, it wasn't until the Rhumba King, Xavier Cugat, began appearing in films carrying a Chihuahua dog in the early 1900s, that the breed gained its celebrity. Today, it has emerged as one of the most popular breeds in the United States.
Another myth about Pit Bull type dogs is that they have a locked jaw which is impossible to break. While many of these dogs do indeed have a strong bite, it is a myth that their jaw locks. It can be broken using a bite stick or by some of the other ways mentioned in our article on breaking a Pit Bull's bite. Another important factor in Pit Bulls is the tendency to dock their tails and ears which makes it more difficult to recognize the signs of aggression in these dogs.
Your American Pit Bull Terrier must be kept on leash in public to prevent aggression toward other dogs. It's not a good idea to let these dogs run loose in dog parks. While they might not start a fight, they'll never back down from one, and they fight to the finish. American Pit Bulls who aren't properly socialized as puppies can become aggressive toward other dogs.

Beagles have what fans call a “musical” voice, but to your neighbors it’s just going to sound like really annoying noise. Beagles will sing along to sirens, “give tongue” when they are hunting, and bark when strangers come to the door, but they aren’t usually nuisance barkers unless they are bored or lonely. If you don’t live out in the country where no one else is around to hear his drawn-out “Aaaaarrrroooooh,” keep your Beagle occupied with toys, the company of another animal or, best of all, your presence so he doesn’t feel the need to serenade the neighborhood.
The word “beagle” is thought to have come from certain old French words meaning an open throat, a possible connection to the dog’s musical bay. It is also speculated that the dog’s name might have derived from old French, Celtic or English words meaning small. Beagle-like dogs were probably used for the popular sport of hare-hunting in England during the 1300s, but the term "beagle" was not used until 1475. Hunters would follow the dog on foot and sometimes even carry one in his pocket. There were several sizes of Beagles in the 1800s, but the pocket-size dogs were most popular. These small dogs measured only about nine inches and required the hunter's help while crossing rough fields. Because the smaller Beagles were slower and easier to follow on foot, they appealed especially to women, the elderly, and those who otherwise did not have the stamina or inclination to keep up with an active dog.
One of the most amiable hounds, the Beagle was originally bred to be part of a pack and needs companionship, whether human or canine. This dog loves to explore the outdoors and is an enthusiastic trailer. Given adequate exercise, the Beagle is a calm, tractable house pet. Beagles tend to be excellent with children, gentle, incredibly tolerant, and always ready to join in a game or adventure. This is an independent breed, however, and may run off if a trail beckons. Beagles bark and howl.
Pet Chihuahuas (that is, those bred or purchased as companions rather than show dogs) often range above these weights, even above 10 lb if they have large bone structures or are allowed to become overweight.[11] This does not mean that they are not purebred Chihuahuas; they just do not meet the requirements to enter a conformation show. Oversized Chihuahuas are seen in some of the best, and worst, bloodlines. Chihuahuas do not breed true for size, and puppies from the same litter can mature in drastically different sizes from one another. Also, larger breeding females are less likely to experience dystocia (obstructed labour). Many breeders try to breed Chihuahuas as small as possible, because those marketed as "teacup" or "tiny teacup" command higher prices.[17] Typically, the breed standard for both the Long and Short Coat Chihuahuas will be identical except for the description of the coat.[18] Chihuahuas have large, round eyes and large, erect ears, set in a high, dramatically rounded skull.[11]
"This here is my baby girl Roxy at 2 and a half months old. She is the first Pit I've owned and I must say...I'll never own another breed of dog BUT Pitbulls! I fell in love with the breed 3 years ago when I went on vacation to California (I live in Washington) and I went to a Pitbull rescue... immediately I was surrounded by 15-20 Pitbulls. I've never had so many dogs at once DYING for my attention!!! I knew from that day on there was no other dog I wanted BUT a Pitbull. No one will ever understand a Pitbull unless they own one. The only thing they want in this world, what they live for, is to please you. Make you laugh and just be your companion. There's no such thing as a bad dog... just a bad owner. It frustrates me to hear all these stories about Pitbulls attacking little kids or biting their owners; most of those dogs that you see on the news AREN'T EVEN PITBULLS!!! They are all mostly mutts. How dare someone claim what a Pitbull is when most of those people have never even seen a Pitbull in person. No one believes me when I say Roxy is a purebred because "she's too small to be a purebred Pitbull" when in reality, purebred Pitbull Terriers ARE medium sized dogs—Roxy is 47 pounds now and pure muscle! She's got what I like to call "the Pitbull wiggle" when she gets so excited her whole body wiggles and she "smiles" at me. (I could really go on forever about Roxy!) She warms my heart and I want to cry sometimes just looking at her, and how happy she makes me. They are determined dogs, and have so much passion and fire in their eyes (just like her mamma!). I don't know what I would do without my baby girl!!!"
Pit bull is the common name for a type of dog descended from bulldogs and terriers. The pit bull-type is particularly ambiguous, as it encompasses a range of pedigree breeds, informal types and appearances that cannot be reliably identified.[1] Formal breeds often considered to be of the pit bull-type include the American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, American Bully, and Staffordshire Bull Terrier.[2][3][4] The American Bulldog is also sometimes included.[5] Mixed-breed dogs which physically resemble these breeds often get labelled as "pit bulls" by shelters. Many of these breeds were originally developed as fighting dogs from crossbreeding bull-baiting dogs (used to hold the faces and heads of larger animals such as bulls) and terriers.[5] After the use of dogs in blood sports was banned, such dogs were used as catch dogs in the United States for semi-wild cattle and hogs, to hunt and drive livestock, and as family companions.[6] Despite dog fighting now being illegal in the United States, it still exists as an underground activity, and pit bulls are a common type used.[7][8][9]
Reality: This is a stereotype that is biased toward generalizing and condemning an entire breed based on the actions of a few bad people. The truth is that each dog should be evaluated by his own merits and not by his breed. A corollary truth is that there truly are no bad dogs, only bad people. In his essay Troublemakers, Malcolm Gladwell discusses what Pit Bull stereotypes can teach us about the wrongness of racial profiling of both humans and dogs.

In March I adopted what was thought to be a “Chihuahua/Cairn Terrier” cross when he was 2 months old, and he’s now just over 3 months. He’s a feisty little guy, 6 lbs., who is all puppy teeth and hasn’t quite figured out potty training yet. I adopted him from our local Animal Control shelter because those animals have a harder time than our SPCA rescues being adopted, plus the price is reasonable, and their care good.
Everything a Beagle does somehow leads back to his nose. His powerful sense of smell overcomes any good sense you might have tried to instill and tells the Beagle to escape from the yard or break into the dog food bag in the pantry or see what’s in the trash. When channeled properly, it’s also what makes him a great arson dog or termite detector, so it all evens out in the end. Just remember that when your Beagle’s nose is down, his “other brain” is turned off.

The Chihuahua burst onto the national stage as a “must have” dog for two reasons: The “Yo Quiero Taco Bell?” ad campaign and, more recently, the tendency of rich, attractive and famous young women to haul these small dogs with big attitudes around in stylish and expensive oversized purses. The appeal? The tiny (as small as two pounds) Chihuahua offers feistiness coupled with enduring loyalty to the person he chooses as his own, along with an expressive face, including large, round eyes that show everything the dog is thinking.
Because of its controversial origins, the Pit Bull is not recognized by the American Kennel Club. This has resulted in the formation of two separate clubs for the specific purpose of registering Pit Bulls. The first was the United Kennel Club (UKC), which was formed in 1898 by founder C. Z. Bennett. The founder’s dog, Bennett’s Ring, was assigned UKC registration number one, making it the first registered Pit Bull in recorded history. The second club, the American Dog Breeders Association (ADBA), began in 1909 as a multiple breed association, but it has been dedicated mainly to Pit Bulls, as the original president, Guy McCord, was an avid fancier and breeder of the American Pit Bull Terrier.
Dogs of either coat type may be identified as either "apple head" or "deer head" Chihuahuas, particularly in the United States. Apple heads have rounded heads, close-set eyes, and relatively short ears and legs. Deer heads have flat-topped heads, more widely set eyes, larger ears, and longer, more slender legs. Deer heads were the breed standard conformation in the mid-20th century, but current breed standards defined by registries such as the AKC specify the apple-head conformation.[13]
Other potential concerns are hunting injuries. A Beagle who puts a foot wrong in a hole can break a leg. And Beagles who escape from the yard in search of that smell-good scent run the risk of being hit by a car. Nor is it uncommon for a Beagle to see the veterinarian because he has eaten something he shouldn’t have. Beagles who pig out on fatty foods or scraps they find in the trash frequently end up hospitalized with a case of “garbage can” enteritis or, more seriously, pancreatitis.
Chihuahuas are intelligent, graceful, and sometimes too brave for their own good. They usually bond with only one person and become highly devoted, frequently kissing the owner's face (with or without approval). The Chihuahua is reserved around strangers, and may attempt to defend their owner, usually with little effect. Chihuahuas are tenacious, proud, and very energetic.
I have just taken on an 11 year old foxy/chihuahua cross and her same age poodle/Maltese boy. The foxy cross only weighs about 3.5 kg. She is a delightful dog. Well house trained and a good inquisitive walker. After two weeks she is very protective of us. She seems fine with other adults and children. Though we don’t have any. She loves chasing balls and we spend time doing that with her as otherwise she has too much energy. She is very very smart. She likes to follow you everywhere and lies next to you once she has been exercised. She was an escape artist but I have had the door open inadvertently and she seemed to have been happy to stay. I adore both these dogs already.

The American Pit Bull Terrier (APBT) has a strong desire to please. The APBT has evoked more human emotional, rational and irrational response than any other breed that exists today. By no means are these dogs people-haters or people-eaters. Their natural aggressive tendencies are toward other dogs and animals, not people. However if they are properly socialized with a firm, but calm, confident, consistent pack leader, they will not even be aggressive with them. The American Pit Bull Terrier is a good-natured, amusing, extremely loyal and affectionate family pet that is good with children and adults. Almost always obedient, it is always eager to please its master. It is an extremely courageous and intelligent guard dog that is very full of vitality. Highly protective of his owners and the owner's property, it will fight an enemy to the death. It is usually very friendly, but has an uncanny ability to know when it needs to protect and when everything is okay. The American Pit Bull Terrier can be willful with meek owners and needs a firm hand. They are generally okay with other pets if they are raised with them from puppyhood. They are very friendly, but not recommended for most people, because most people do not understand how to properly raise and treat a dog. Problems arise when one does not understand natural dog behavior, seeing the dog as having human emotions, and ends up with a dog who thinks he is the boss of the house. For a smaller, not as powerful dog, people can sometimes get away with this, however, for a powerful breed, one really needs to understand and follow this concept of keeping a dog. Excellent with children in the family, they have a high pain tolerance and will happily put up with rough child play. As with any breed, they should not be left alone with unfamiliar children. Used as all-around working farm dogs, they were referred to as "the poor man’s horse." Later they were used as fighting dogs; the powerful American Pit Bull may go for the throat of strange dogs. A minimum of training, along with the proper amount of exercise and a firm pack leader, will produce a tranquil, obedient dog. Socialize very thoroughly when young to combat aggressive tendencies and be sure to keep the dog under control when other dogs are present. Teach this dog respect for humans by not allowing it to jump up and not allowing it to enter doorways first. The humans must make the dog heel beside or behind them when walking. It has given outstanding results as a guardian of property, but is at the same time esteemed as a companion dog. The objective in training this dog is to achieve pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in its pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. The entire pack cooperates under a single leader; lines are clearly defined and rules are set. You and all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. That is the only way your relationship can be a success. When properly trained and socialized, this is a very good dog and a great family companion. Unfortunately, some choose to promote the fighting instinct in the breed, giving it a bad name.
The majority of Chihuahuas are healthy little dogs, but there are some genetic issues that can affect the breed. You should choose your dog from a breeder who routinely does genetic health screenings on all breeding stock to ensure that the puppies they produce are as genetically sound as possible. Some of the issues that can possibly affect the Chihuahua include potential heart problems (patent ductus arteriosus, mitral valve disease), eye disease, and patellar luxation (loose kneecaps). Idiopathic epilepsy is also known to occur in the breed.

I have a, what i am discovering a Ratcha…she is intelligent, housebroke at 3 months, and at first frightened by children. But my job and life evolve around children. Now she loves them. Some people she does not like, no matter how hard they try to warm up to her. But once she likes you, she really likes you. She has anxieties over several things. Before a long car ride I have to give her melatonin. Loud noise petrifies her. She loves to cuddle up in the warm blankets as soon as they come out of the dryer. She burrows underneath her blankets…the warmer the better. She chases the cats, but doesnt hurt them. She barks alot, but a bark collar helps. She chokes easy, so you have to put on a vest type collar when going for walks. She follows me to every room…no matter. If I put on a space heater, shes the first one there. The cats are no match with her in catching mice. She has it within seconds of its being in the open. Shes fast! She loves squeaky toys, but wants you to throw it, and fight her for it. Then she shakes it to death! Shes extremely loyal to me. Her name is Gidget, and I love this little dog with all my heart.
On the other hand, Cairn Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier, and Welsh Terrier are small-sized dogs that are very warm and cute. But at the same time, they are intelligent, bright, tenacious, and fearless, irrespective of their size and shape. They can be friendly with people, if they are socialized properly. It is highly important that these dogs go through proper obedience training. 
These dogs are extremely intelligent and learn commands and tricks with ease. They have a zest for life and love to be involved in everything going on around them. They maintain a puppyish demeanor well into adulthood, and that vitality makes them a joy to live with. Once you have met and gotten to know this breed you will wonder how you ever lived without one.

Neck, Topline, Body: Neck – Slightly arched, gracefully sloping into lean shoulders. Topline– Level. Body -Ribs rounded and well sprung (but not too much “barrel-shaped”). Tail – Moderately long, carried sickle either up or out, or in a loop over the back with tip just touching the back. (Never tucked between legs.) Disqualifications – Docked tail, bobtail.
In a 1520 letter, Hernan Cortés wrote that the Aztecs raised and sold the little dogs as food.[7] Colonial records refer to small, nearly hairless dogs at the beginning of the 19th century, one of which claims 16th-century Conquistadores found them plentiful in the region later known as Chihuahua.[8] Small dogs such as Chihuahuas were also used as living heating pads during illness or injury. Some believe this practice is where the idea of pain being transferred to animals from humans originated, which gave way to rituals such as burning the deceased with live dogs, such as the Techichi, to exonerate the deceased human's sins.[9] Chihuahuas as we know them today remained a rarity until the early 20th century; the American Kennel Club (AKC) did not register a Chihuahua until 1904.[10]
Although Chihuahuas are prized for their small size, they're often fed to obesity. A Chihuahua's skeleton is not designed to carry much weight, and even a few extra ounces can be a significant burden to a dog this size. As with all dogs, leanness is far healthier – and cheaper, when it comes to veterinary costs. Keeping a Chihuahua lean is particularly important if he has luxating patellas.
The merle coat pattern, which appears mottled, is not traditionally considered part of the breed standard. In May 2007, The Kennel Club decided not to register puppies with this coloration due to the health risks associated with the responsible gene, and in December of that year, formally amended its breed standard to disqualify merle dogs.[20] The Fédération Cynologique Internationale, which represents the major kennel clubs of 84 countries, also disqualified merle.[16] Other countries' kennel clubs, including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Germany, have also disqualified merle. However, in May 2008, the Chihuahua Club of America voted that merles would not be disqualified in the United States, and would be fully registrable and able to compete in AKC events. Opponents of merle recognition suspect the coloration came about by modern crossbreeding with other dogs and not by natural genetic drift.[21][citation needed]
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