"Monkey is a 10-week-old Chihuahua. She got her name Monkey because she climbs on my shoulders all the time and adores bananas, so I thought 'Monkey' really fit her. She is very, very playful and is a joy to have. She is completely pad trained now and knows sit! She lives with 2 adults, 2 teenagers (15 and 16) and 2 little kids (7 and 11) and she loves everyone. But, is very attached to me (I'm 16). Monkey is estimated to weigh about 3 lbs. full grown. She is extremely smart and has great manners, surprisingly. Monkey is for sure a lapdog and follows me around everywhere!! Loves car rides and is very well socialized. I've watched Cesar Millan for about 3 years now and have read his book. He's amazing and has taught me so much about dog psychology, he is truly my idol. Monkey is a well-balanced dog and I taught her young not to have the mind set to walk all over me or try to control me in any way. Though she is spoiled rotten, she knows who is boss. I could not imagine my life without my little Monkey and have lots of years to look forward to. I will ONLY have Chihuahuas; they are an amazing breed and truly a joy to have!!"

The Beagle has a smooth, dense double coat that gets heavier in the winter, so spring is shedding season. Beagles also shed moderately year-round. Weekly brushing with a medium-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a hound glove will remove the loose hair, and promotes new hair growth as well. Beagles don’t need to be bathed too often, unless they happen to get into something particularly messy. As with all breeds, the Beagle’s nails should be trimmed regularly, because overly long nails can cause the dog pain as well as problems walking and running.

^ Patronek, Gary J., Sacks, Jeffrey J., Delise, Karen M., Cleary, Donald V., Marder, Amy R. (December 2013). "Co-occurrence of potentially preventable factors in 256 dog bite–related fatalities in the United States (2000–2009)". Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 243 (#12): 1726–1736. doi:10.2460/javma.243.12.1726. PMID 24299544.
The most important thing to know about the Beagle is that he is a scenthound. His nose is the most important part of his anatomy and his head is always down to the ground, searching for an interesting trail to follow. Beagles have approximately 220 million scent receptors compared to the paltry 5 million or so in people, which makes them very good at picking up scents. Humorist Dave Barry once described his in-laws' Beagle as "a nose with feet."
By the 18th century two breeds had been developed for hunting hare and rabbit: the Southern Hound and the North Country Beagle (or Northern Hound). The Southern Hound, a tall, heavy dog with a square head, and long, soft ears, was common from south of the River Trent and probably closely related to the Talbot Hound. Though slow, it had stamina and an excellent scenting ability. The North Country Beagle, possibly a cross between an offshoot of the Talbot stock and a Greyhound, was bred chiefly in Yorkshire and was common in the northern counties. It was smaller than the Southern Hound, less heavy-set and with a more pointed muzzle. It was faster than its southern counterpart but its scenting abilities were less well developed.[9] As fox hunting became increasingly popular, numbers of both types of hound diminished. The beagle-type dogs were crossed with larger breeds such as Stag Hounds to produce the modern Foxhound. The beagle-size varieties came close to extinction but some farmers in the South ensured the survival of the prototype breeds by maintaining small rabbit-hunting packs.
Before individual Beagles can be included in the Canine Health Information Center (CHIC) database, the National Beagle Club requires them to have a hip certification from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) or the University of Pennsylvania (PennHIP) and certification from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF), and test results from the University of California at Davis Veterinary Genetics Lab must be registered with the OFA.
There are reports of small pack-hounds employed to hunt rabbit and hare in England long before the Roman legions arrived in 55 B.C. An English authority called the Beagle the “foothound of our country, indigenous to the soil.” By the 1500s, most English gentlemen had packs of large hounds that tracked deer, and smaller hounds that tracked hares. The smaller, more compact hounds were ancestors of our modern Beagle.
Pit Bulls can be loving and wonderful dogs for individuals and families. It is only with proper understanding and consideration that their reputation can be changed and that people can really start to appreciate this breed appropriately, just as it is with any breed of dog. As always, we encourage readers to trust empirical evidence and rigorous study carried out by evidence based programs.

In 1861, Albert Kinsey Owen envisioned a railroad link through Mexico’s Sierra Madre that would reduce the shipping route from the United States, through South America and on to the Orient. By utilizing Mexico’s deep-water port at Puerto Topolobompo, trade routes would be decreased by some 400 miles. The Kansas City Mexico Orient Railway (KCMO) was to travel from Kansas, through Chihuahua and on to the west coast of Mexico. Due to numerous setbacks–including the Mexican Revolution of 1914–the rail system took nearly 100 years to complete. Today, the railroad, known as Chihuahua al Pacífico, or El Chepe, runs from the coast into the deep chasms of Chihuahua’s Copper Canyon System.
"I have been watching Cesar Millan's shows for a couple months now and have started to use a lot of his techniques. While my puppies are still young and are a work in progress as most are, I think using these techniques will help them become balanced adults. Of course, the more I watch, the more I learn so I am also a "pack leader work in progress." My pups are already great minding as a result and as an example of that as you can see they are easily "pose-able" for photographs. :o)"
In this AnimalWised article we will try to clarify any doubts that may arise when talking about the different Pit Bull breeds and types you might find. It is vital to be well informed before making any decisions, should you be thinking about adopting one of these wonderful dogs. You will also want to know their different characteristics and features. That's why we bring you these Pit Bull breeds with pictures so you can identify the differences.
Having a solid structure, the Beagle resembles a Foxhound. Hunters can follow the dog on foot, and the tuneful bay of the Beagle aids hunters in locating the dog from a distance. Because of its moderate size, the Beagle can even be carried to the hunting site, where it can then scurry into the dense undergrowth to look for the target. The dog receives protection against the thick underbrush from its coarse and close coat. And being an amicable dog makes it a great pack hunter, mixing well with other dogs.

These dogs are extremely intelligent and learn commands and tricks with ease. They have a zest for life and love to be involved in everything going on around them. They maintain a puppyish demeanor well into adulthood, and that vitality makes them a joy to live with. Once you have met and gotten to know this breed you will wonder how you ever lived without one.
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