Thank you for the amazing article, filled with great and interesting information! I love such a clear-minded and healthy approach, where one can simply see that people truly know what they're talking about. Too often, as in negative myths, people write "oh they're just wonderful". Which is true!, but, it is better to be educated and have strong facts behind the statement so one can have a trustful argument when speaking – and to really show the people what is TRUE, not a personal opinion – be it in a positive or negative context.
The merle coat pattern, which appears mottled, is not traditionally considered part of the breed standard. In May 2007, The Kennel Club decided not to register puppies with this coloration due to the health risks associated with the responsible gene, and in December of that year, formally amended its breed standard to disqualify merle dogs.[20] The Fédération Cynologique Internationale, which represents the major kennel clubs of 84 countries, also disqualified merle.[16] Other countries' kennel clubs, including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Germany, have also disqualified merle. However, in May 2008, the Chihuahua Club of America voted that merles would not be disqualified in the United States, and would be fully registrable and able to compete in AKC events. Opponents of merle recognition suspect the coloration came about by modern crossbreeding with other dogs and not by natural genetic drift.[21][citation needed]
The history of the Chihuahua is quite controversial. According to one theory, it was originally developed in China and then brought to the Americas by Spanish traders, where it was interbred with small native dogs. Others speculate it is of South and Central American origin, descended from a small, mute dog -- the native Techichi -- which was occasionally sacrificed in Toltec religious rites. It was believed that this diminutive red dog guided the soul to the underworld after death. Thus, all Aztec families kept this dog and buried it with the deceased member of the family. (Curiously, the Toltecs and the Aztecs also fed on the Techichi.) When not used in burial rituals, however, the Aztec and Toltec priests and families took great care of the Techichis.
I just lost my little girl; she was a Wirehaired Terrier Chihuahua mix who was almost 18-years-old. I know that people tell me that was a good long run for a dog, but for me, it just wasn’t long enough. She had bonded to me, and since I retired two and a half years ago, we have been inseparable. Her name was Zoie, and she followed me everywhere. If she was asleep and I left the room, she would wake up and look for me. She was the smartest dog that I have had. I am heartbroken with the loss. Three nights ago, she died in my arms with me, begging for her to stay with me. I can’t replace her, but maybe I can fill the hole in my heart that was created when she was taken from me. After reading your article, I am concerned about getting a healthy dog.

I had what I think was a Chihuahua/Cairn Terrier mix but not sure. Her name was Mia and she weighed 7 lbs. I got her from a shelter; she was given up by a young couple when they separated and supposedly she was bought at a puppy mill and was listed as a Chiweenie (but there’s no way!). We got her at 9 months and she was a bit difficult to potty train but we got through it. She loved her cage and got along fabulously with our Golden Retriever. They were buddies. Unfortunately, she darted into the street and someone hit her; she died instantly. I am devastated because she truly was the BEST dog I’ve ever had. She had a HUGE personality for such a tiny dog and she was a loving snuggler who was always there when you needed her. She was killed this week and I am inconsolable. I want another one but I have no idea where to begin.
Beagles may be prone to epilepsy, but this can often be controlled with medication. Hypothyroidism and a number of types of dwarfism occur in beagles. Two conditions in particular are unique to the breed: "Funny Puppy", in which the puppy is slow to develop and eventually develops weak legs, a crooked back and although normally healthy, is prone to a range of illnesses;[49] and Musladin-Lueke Syndrome (MLS) in which the eyes are slanted and the outer toes are underdeveloped but otherwise development is as normal.[50] Hip dysplasia, common in Harriers and in some larger breeds, is rarely considered a problem in beagles.[51] Beagles are considered a chondrodystrophic breed, meaning that they are prone to types of disk diseases.[52]
On the other hand, Cairn Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier, and Welsh Terrier are small-sized dogs that are very warm and cute. But at the same time, they are intelligent, bright, tenacious, and fearless, irrespective of their size and shape. They can be friendly with people, if they are socialized properly. It is highly important that these dogs go through proper obedience training. 
Because of their dog-fighting heritage, some American Pit Bull Terriers retain a tendency to be aggressive with other dogs, but if they are socialized early and trained to know what behavior is expected of them, that aggression can be minimized or overcome, and many are dog- and cat-friendly. Just to be safe, they should always be supervised in the presence of other pets.
When these "bull dogs" accompanied immigrants to America they began new careers as all-around farm dogs. Their jobs included hunting wild game, guarding the property from animal intruders, and providing companionship. In keeping with the "bigger is better" mindset of their new country, the settlers developed a dog larger than it had been in England.

How can you tell whether a Chihuahua puppy will mature at 4 lbs and up? There's a general rule of thumb that says you can take the weight of a Chihuahua puppy at 14 weeks old and double it to estimate his adult weight. So to get an adult who will weigh 4 lbs and up, look for a 14-week-old pup who weighs at least 2 lbs. It's not perfect, but it's usually pretty close.
Developed from the Bull and Terrier types dogs, the American Pit Bull Terrier can be traced back to the early 1800s in what is now known as the United Kingdom. They were bred as an all-around farm dog, working the farms as a cattle/hog dog. Some chose to turn their talents into the sport of pit-fighting. The breed's tenacity and accompanying strength are unmatched in the canine world. As rich and captivating as the breed's history is, the Pit Bull's future is more worthy of commentary. Some proponents of the breed argue that this breed is the original bulldog of the past. Old prints and woodcarvings show reason to believe this. They show dogs that look exactly like the breed today, doing things the dog is still capable of doing. For more information on this theory you can read books by Richard F. Stratton. The APBT, as registered by the UKC, is an individual breed of dog and does not refer to just any ill-bred, mindless warrior-type mongrel. At one time, the Pit Bull had an all around reputation of a much loved, trustworthy companion. Unfortunately the breed has become a status symbol for many types of criminals who chose to train these dogs to fight. It is those types of people who are chiefly responsible for the banning and witch-hunting that has been sweeping the U.S. The media, however, should not go unmentioned, for it is also responsible for escalating isolated incidences in a relentless and attention-getting way. Most Pit Bulls are bred as family dogs or sports such as weight pulling, but the media will rarely mention this. They get more views pretending all Pit Bulls are bred by fighters. In a lot of cases when the media is reporting about a Pit Bull attacking, it is indeed not even a Pit Bull at all, but a mixed breed of some sort, or another bull breed all together. For example, there was a report on KYW news in Philadelphia about two Pit Bulls attacking a person. The dogs did not look like Pit Bulls, but rather Boxer mixes. The news station was called and asked if they knew the dogs were in fact purebred American Pit Bull Terriers, or another bull breed of some sort, or mutts, for that matter. They stated they did not know, and to call the police station to verify that information. They were asked how they could report something that they were not sure of. They had no answer and they were not sure of the dogs’ breeds. Even after admitting on the phone that they did not in fact know the breeds of the dogs in question, they kept calling the dogs Pit Bulls in their reports. Why? Because the name Pit Bull will draw out the most attention from the public. The Pit Bull's future has been perhaps irreparably undone and everyone is to blame except the dog itself. This very loyal dog is too set on pleasing his owner, and ironically this is the root of his own undoing. Accompanying this need to please are remarkable abilities of all kinds. Jack Dempsy, Teddy Roosevelt and Jack Johnson are just a few people who have owned Pit Bulls. Pit Bulls excel in practically every canine task including herding, guarding, hunting, policing, cart pulling and ratting. A Pit Bull named Banddog Dread holds more canine working titles than ANY other breed. The owner's name is Diane Jessup and you can reference her book "The Working Pit Bull." It tells all of Dread's accomplishments. These dogs are truly capable of many tasks. The difference between Pits and American Staffordshire Terriers is a difficult one. Even breeders can't agree. The main difference is the bloodline. Amstaffs are show dogs and dog fighters usually do not use dogs with Amstaff blood. As time progresses there will be more of a difference. Many are dual registered as Amstaffs with the AKC and Pits with the UKC.
Terriers are very active and fearless dogs who vary greatly in size. They are categorized by their sizes or habits. They sure are well-known for their varied temperament, which can be hilarious, heart warming, and also inspiring at times. Even though they are physically small to medium in size, they make for perfect watch dogs. They are loyal, kind, and very loving, which makes them perfect pets for families too. Here is some more information about a few types of terrier dogs.
The phrase “foot hound” is vital to understanding the Beagle’s broad appeal for hunters in England, the Continent, and North America. Unlike larger pack hunters like foxhounds or Harriers, the Beagle could be hunted on foot—no horse was necessary. Those who couldn’t afford to feed and stable a mount, and ladies and gentlemen too old spend a hard day thundering across the countryside on horseback, could easily keep up with a pack of Beagles on foot.
How do Chihuahuas get along with dogs outside their own family? Often not well. Chihuahuas often raise a ruckus when they spy a strange dog, especially a larger dog. It's as though the Chihuahua wants to convince the larger dog that he is a force to reckon with rather than a helpless prey animal. The Chihuahua may be seeking to protect itself by putting up a blustering facade that tells the other dog to "move along."
Owners of rental properties may also be held liable if they knew an aggressive dog was living on their property and they did nothing to ensure the safety of other tenants at the property; as a result, many rental properties forbid pit bull-type dogs and any other breeds if the rental property's insurance will not cover damage inflicted by that type of dog. The dog breeds most often targeted by insurance companies include pit bull-type dogs, Rottweilers, German Shepherd Dogs, Doberman Pinschers, Akitas (Akita Inu and American Akitas), and Chow Chows.[68]

Wellness CORE Grain-Free Small Breed Turkey & Chicken Recipe Dry Dog Food: This protein-heavy, dry dog food lists turkey meal, deboned turkey, chicken meal, peas and potatoes as its main ingredients. It also has some carbohydrates but only in small amounts and derived from vegetables. Aside from the needed vitamins and minerals, it also has chondroitin and glucosamine to help improve your dog’s bones.


Small, compact, and hardy, Beagles are active companions for kids and adults alike. Canines in this dog breed are merry and fun loving, but being hounds, they can also be stubborn and require patient, creative training techniques. Their noses guide them through life, and they’re never happier than when following an interesting scent. The Beagle originally was bred as a scenthound to track small game, mostly rabbits and hare. He is still used for this purpose in many countries, including the United States.

The Chihuahua is a tiny toy sized dog. The body is longer than it is tall. The head is well-rounded, apple in shape and the muzzle is short and pointed with a well-defined stop. Puppies have a soft spot on the top of the skull called a "molera," which usually closes by adulthood. The large, round eyes are set well apart and are dark, ruby, and may be lighter in white dogs. Eye color varies and are often dark, but the merle gene can produce a dog with blue eyes. The erect ears are large. Dewclaws may be removed. The tail is long, sickle-shaped and either curled over the back or to the side. The coat can be short, long and wavy or flat. All colors, both solid, marked or splashed are accepted. Colors include, but are not limited to, black, white, chestnut, fawn, sand, silver, sable, steel blue, black & tan and parti-color.


The general appearance of the beagle resembles a miniature Foxhound, but the head is broader and the muzzle shorter, the expression completely different and the legs shorter in proportion to the body.[29] They are generally between 13 and 16 inches (33 and 41 cm) high at the withers and weigh between 18 and 35 lb (8.2 and 15.9 kg), with females being slightly smaller than males on average.[30]
Due to their athleticism and diverse breeding background, the Pit Bull breed tends to be hardy, with an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, longer than many breeds of a similar size. There are some genetic conditions to be watchful for. The Pit Bull tends to suffer from bone diseases such as hip dysplasia, degenerative myelopathy and kneecap dislocation. The Pit Bull can also suffer from skin problems, such as mange and skin allergies, because of its short coat. Other health ailments seen in Pit Bulls include thyroid and congenital heart defects.
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