Another myth about Pit Bull type dogs is that they have a locked jaw which is impossible to break. While many of these dogs do indeed have a strong bite, it is a myth that their jaw locks. It can be broken using a bite stick or by some of the other ways mentioned in our article on breaking a Pit Bull's bite. Another important factor in Pit Bulls is the tendency to dock their tails and ears which makes it more difficult to recognize the signs of aggression in these dogs.
While there are different types of Pit Bulls, they do share some common characteristics. Pit Bull breeds are generally muscular dogs with a strong bite and, unfortunately, a bad reputation with some. Incorrect information about Pit Bull attacks or sensationalized stories contribute to this situation. However, much of this has to do with the terrible abuse individuals have suffered at the hands of many owners who have historically engaged them in the vile practice of dog fighting. This does not mean that Staffies, for example, are inherently dangerous dogs.

The American Pit Bull Terrier (APBT) is one of the most most popular dog breeds. Unfortunately, even after long periods of domestication, there is still a lot of controversy surrounding them and related Pit Bull breeds. This is often due to misunderstanding and misinterpretation of their nature. The truth is that Pit Bull breeds can be among the most loving, affectionate, loyal and beautiful companions a person can have.
When these "bull dogs" accompanied immigrants to America they began new careers as all-around farm dogs. Their jobs included hunting wild game, guarding the property from animal intruders, and providing companionship. In keeping with the "bigger is better" mindset of their new country, the settlers developed a dog larger than it had been in England.

Due to their athleticism and diverse breeding background, the Pit Bull breed tends to be hardy, with an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, longer than many breeds of a similar size. There are some genetic conditions to be watchful for. The Pit Bull tends to suffer from bone diseases such as hip dysplasia, degenerative myelopathy and kneecap dislocation. The Pit Bull can also suffer from skin problems, such as mange and skin allergies, because of its short coat. Other health ailments seen in Pit Bulls include thyroid and congenital heart defects.
Reverend Phillip Honeywood established a beagle pack in Essex in the 1830s and it is believed that this pack formed the basis for the modern breed. Although details of the pack's lineage are not recorded it is thought that North Country Beagles and Southern Hounds were strongly represented; William Youatt suspected that Harriers formed a good majority of the beagle's bloodline, but the origin of the Harrier is itself obscure.[5] Honeywood's Beagles were small, standing at about 10 inches (25 cm) at the shoulder, and pure white according to John Mills (writing in The Sportsman's Library in 1845). Prince Albert and Lord Winterton also had Beagle packs around this time, and royal favour no doubt led to some revival of interest in the breed, but Honeywood's pack was regarded as the finest of the three.[10]
Dog effigy pots dating to around 1325 AD discovered in Georgia and Tennessee also appear to represent the Chihuahua.[6] In 1850, a pot featuring the Chihuahua-like dogs was unearthed in old ruins at Casas Grandes in the Mexican state of Chihuahua, which dates from 1100–1300 AD showing the long history of such dogs at this site,[5] although most artifacts relating to its existence are found around Mexico City. It has been argued that these pots arrived with survivors from the Casas Grandes site in Chihuahua, Mexico, after it was attacked and destroyed around 1340 AD.
The beagle has an even temper and gentle disposition. Described in several breed standards as "merry", they are amiable and typically neither aggressive nor timid, although this depends on the individual. They enjoy company, and although they may initially be standoffish with strangers, they are easily won over. They make poor guard dogs for this reason, although their tendency to bark or howl when confronted with the unfamiliar makes them good watch dogs. In a 1985 study conducted by Ben and Lynette Hart, the beagle was given the highest excitability rating, along with the Yorkshire Terrier, Cairn Terrier, Miniature Schnauzer, West Highland White Terrier, and Fox Terrier.[41][c]
During the Mexican Revolution, which began in 1910, Chihuahua was again a central battleground. Peasant revolutionary leader Francisco “Pancho” Villa fought throughout Chihuahua, demanding that the peasants be apportioned land and be recognized as legitimate participants in Mexican politics. Villa’s famous Northern Division was first assembled in Chihuahua.
"This here is my baby girl Roxy at 2 and a half months old. She is the first Pit I've owned and I must say...I'll never own another breed of dog BUT Pitbulls! I fell in love with the breed 3 years ago when I went on vacation to California (I live in Washington) and I went to a Pitbull rescue... immediately I was surrounded by 15-20 Pitbulls. I've never had so many dogs at once DYING for my attention!!! I knew from that day on there was no other dog I wanted BUT a Pitbull. No one will ever understand a Pitbull unless they own one. The only thing they want in this world, what they live for, is to please you. Make you laugh and just be your companion. There's no such thing as a bad dog... just a bad owner. It frustrates me to hear all these stories about Pitbulls attacking little kids or biting their owners; most of those dogs that you see on the news AREN'T EVEN PITBULLS!!! They are all mostly mutts. How dare someone claim what a Pitbull is when most of those people have never even seen a Pitbull in person. No one believes me when I say Roxy is a purebred because "she's too small to be a purebred Pitbull" when in reality, purebred Pitbull Terriers ARE medium sized dogs—Roxy is 47 pounds now and pure muscle! She's got what I like to call "the Pitbull wiggle" when she gets so excited her whole body wiggles and she "smiles" at me. (I could really go on forever about Roxy!) She warms my heart and I want to cry sometimes just looking at her, and how happy she makes me. They are determined dogs, and have so much passion and fire in their eyes (just like her mamma!). I don't know what I would do without my baby girl!!!"
Dogs of either coat type may be identified as either "apple head" or "deer head" Chihuahuas, particularly in the United States. Apple heads have rounded heads, close-set eyes, and relatively short ears and legs. Deer heads have flat-topped heads, more widely set eyes, larger ears, and longer, more slender legs. Deer heads were the breed standard conformation in the mid-20th century, but current breed standards defined by registries such as the AKC specify the apple-head conformation.[13]
Two-color varieties always have a white base color with areas of the second color. Tan and white is the most common two-color variety, but there is a wide range of other colors including lemon, a very light tan; red, a reddish, almost orange, brown; and liver, a darker brown, and black. Liver is not common and is not permitted in some standards; it tends to occur with yellow eyes. Ticked or mottled varieties may be either white or black with different colored flecks (ticking), such as the blue-mottled or bluetick beagle, which has spots that appear to be a midnight-blue color, similar to the coloring of the Bluetick Coonhound. Some tricolor beagles also have ticking of various colors in their white areas.[33][34]
I have a chiuhuahua border terrier cross. He’s just about 16 months old. It’s just me and my husband and he loves us equally. He hates kids, always barks and growls at them. He surprisingly likes most other people, unless my husband isn’t around, he gets protective over me if men come around me. He likes all dogs, big and small. He jumps at them and is very playful. He’s also very snugly and sweet. I have noticed the tranchea problem with him though and also his eyes water all the time. He’s fixed and still only weighs about 5 lbs. he’s been hard to potty train- he wouldn’t go out into the snow until this year. I usually have to carry him on walks in cold and wet weather because he’s always shivering. he’s inquisitive, likes to wander.. we have to keep a close eye on him at the dog parks because he can wiggle his way under the fence to run after the dogs! Definitely the best dog I ever had, he’s got the most unique personality, he’s not ‘yappy’ for the most part.. just at night when I’m trying to sleep lol.
I just lost my little girl; she was a Wirehaired Terrier Chihuahua mix who was almost 18-years-old. I know that people tell me that was a good long run for a dog, but for me, it just wasn’t long enough. She had bonded to me, and since I retired two and a half years ago, we have been inseparable. Her name was Zoie, and she followed me everywhere. If she was asleep and I left the room, she would wake up and look for me. She was the smartest dog that I have had. I am heartbroken with the loss. Three nights ago, she died in my arms with me, begging for her to stay with me. I can’t replace her, but maybe I can fill the hole in my heart that was created when she was taken from me. After reading your article, I am concerned about getting a healthy dog.
The Beagle is a social dog that is particularly well suited to the company of humans and other dogs alike. It also needs to spend equal time in the yard as it does in the house. Regular exercise, such as a romp at the park or in a spacious yard area, along with regular leash-led walks are great outdoor activities for the Beagle. This breed can withstand temperate climates and live outdoors most seasons, as long as it has bedding and an enclosed, warm shelter. With its short, close coat, the Beagle does not require extensive grooming. An occasional brushing to encourage turnover of hair, and to minimize hair buildup in the house is all that is needed to keep your Beagle looking healthy and vibrant.
I have a male Chiweenie/terrier (probably Cairn) mix possibly with some Chinese crested. I rescued him when he was just a little over a year (a vets office was taking care of him so he was well socialized and loved there). He is the best dog I could every hope for. They had named him Foo Man Chu because of his beard but I named him Cooper. He is black with a little white on his feet. His underbelly has almost no hair. He is a great watch dog which I wanted since I work from home. He doesn’t bark unless he hears something. He loves everyone, literally, especially kids. I have made a point of showing the kids in my complex how to approach a small dog. Cooper loves to give kisses. When he sees someone he knows his tail wagging could knock you over and he only weighs 10 pounds. The only issues I have had are the allergies and the luxating patella. He starts to skip a little when he has done too much. Although he could play with his bff for hours, it can take him a couple of days to recover so I watch that. He loves to lay in his bed next to my computer and WATCH ME work. Of course he loves belly rubs. He rides in the car very well. He is 5 now and is my superdooperCooper!
In 1916, five members of the National Beagle Club purchased 508 acres in Western Loudoun County, Virginia for the purpose of holding field trials. The men who purchased it formed a corporation called Institute Corporate to purchase and own the land, then leasing it to the Institute Foundation that maintains the property for the National Beagle Club, which today is the site of many activities of the National Beagle Club.
By looking at descriptions and images of different terrier breeds, you may get a better idea at what the genetic makeup is of your dog. If you are really curious about the heritage of your terrier mix breeds and have the means to do so, there are a variety of interesting genetic testing options available to dig further in their DNA. But just by browsing through the breeds, you may find yourself looking at a canine face that is a little familiar.

In Beagles, you should expect to see health clearances from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) for hip dysplasia (with a score of fair or better), elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand's disease; from Auburn University for thrombopathia; and from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF) certifying that eyes are normal. You can confirm health clearances by checking the OFA web site (offa.org).
There are two varieties of Chihuahua recognised by the AKC– the Smooth Coat (short haired) and the Long Coat (long haired). Both the Smooth and the Long Coats have their special attractions and are equally easy to keep clean and well groomed.[12] The UK Kennel Club considers the two as distinct breeds; mating between the two are not eligible for KC registration.

As hunting with beagles was seen as ideal for young people, many of the British public schools traditionally maintained beagle packs. Protests were lodged against Eton's use of beagles for hunting as early as 1902 but the pack is still in existence today,[60] and a pack used by Imperial College in Wye, Kent was stolen by the Animal Liberation Front in 2001.[61] School and university packs are still maintained by Eton, Marlborough, Wye, Radley, the Royal Agricultural University and Christ Church, Oxford.[62]
Chihuahuas are saucy and alert, with a mind of their own. They might not be able to talk, but that doesn’t prevent them from letting you know exactly what they want: usually plenty of quality time with their favorite person. Chihuahuas are often devoted to a particular person in the family and can even become obsessive about their desire to be with them and protect them. There’s a name for those dogs: “armpit piranhas.” If they’re being held and someone approaches the person holding them, the Chihuahua will make every effort to protect his person, whether it’s necessary or not.

Look for a breeder who is a member in good standing of the Chihuahua Club of America and who has agreed to abide by the club's code of ethics. It specifies that its members should evaluate all breeding stock for hereditary faults, never sell dogs to pet stores, and take back Chihuahuas they have bred in the event that the buyer cannot keep them. The CCA lists member breeders on its website, but it’s still important to interview them before buying.


The Chihuahua's history is convoluted, and many theories surround the origin of the breed. Both folklore and archaeological finds show that the breed has origins in Mexico. The most common theory is that Chihuahua are descended from the Techichi, a companion dog favored by the Toltec civilization in Mexico.[2] No records of the Techichi are available before the 9th century, although dog pots from Colima, Mexico, buried as part of the western Mexico shaft tomb tradition, which date back to 300 BC, are thought to depict Techichis.[3] The earlier ancestors probably were present before the Mayas as dogs approximating the Chihuahua are found in materials from the Great Pyramid of Cholula, antedating 1530 and in the ruins of Chichen Itza on the Yucatán Peninsula.[2] However, a genetic study indicated that there was less than 2 percent pre-European mitochondrial DNA in modern Chihuahuas due to admixture with the European dogs.[4]
Sites like Petfinder.com and Adopt-a-Pet.com can have you searching for a Beagle in your area in no time flat. The site allows you to be very specific in your requests (housetraining status, for example) or very general (all the Beagles available on Petfinder across the country). AnimalShelter can help you find animal rescue groups in your area. Also some local newspapers have “pets looking for homes” sections you can review.
As for eating, well, Beagles will try to eat anything. They are professional food thieves, and they will eat anything that even looks like it might be food, including things that you wouldn’t imagine would interest them. If nothing else, living with a Beagle will teach you, your spouse and your kids not to leave food of any kind within a Beagle’s nose range.
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