Other potential concerns are hunting injuries. A Beagle who puts a foot wrong in a hole can break a leg. And Beagles who escape from the yard in search of that smell-good scent run the risk of being hit by a car. Nor is it uncommon for a Beagle to see the veterinarian because he has eaten something he shouldn’t have. Beagles who pig out on fatty foods or scraps they find in the trash frequently end up hospitalized with a case of “garbage can” enteritis or, more seriously, pancreatitis.

We own a 10 lb chi/terrier mix who has some serious itchy under belly hair loss going on. She has tested negative for allergies and has been on hydrolyzed food now for a month with no changes to her hair loss. She also takes appoquel daily. Along with this, she will randomly pee in the house. She seems like a very bright dog, so this trait is very frustrating. Not sure what the next step will be but would appreciate hearing from others in this situation.
The largest state in Mexico, Chihuahua is headquarters for the world’s fifth largest oil company, Pertróleos Mexicanos. It is also where one of the smallest canine breeds, the Chihuahua, originated. After railroad travel to the Copper Canyon area was upgraded following privatization of the railroad in 1998, tourism became an important and growing segment of the economy. Attractions include the beautiful Copper Canyon region and Pancho Villa’s mansion.
The history of the Chihuahua is quite controversial. According to one theory, it was originally developed in China and then brought to the Americas by Spanish traders, where it was interbred with small native dogs. Others speculate it is of South and Central American origin, descended from a small, mute dog -- the native Techichi -- which was occasionally sacrificed in Toltec religious rites. It was believed that this diminutive red dog guided the soul to the underworld after death. Thus, all Aztec families kept this dog and buried it with the deceased member of the family. (Curiously, the Toltecs and the Aztecs also fed on the Techichi.) When not used in burial rituals, however, the Aztec and Toltec priests and families took great care of the Techichis.

Pit bulls also constitute the majority of dogs used for illegal dog fighting in America.[10] In addition, law enforcement organisations report these dogs are used for other nefarious purposes, such as guarding illegal narcotics operations.[11][12] use against police,[13] and as attack dogs.[14] On the other side of the law, pit bulls have been used as police dogs.[15][16]
The Chihuahua is a native of Mexico, and his ancestors were surrounded by many myths. They were believed to be spirit guides that protected souls as they traveled through the underworld. While the stories about the dog’s origins are interesting, there’s no real evidence about how long they’ve existed or that they were known to the Aztecs or other peoples who inhabited Mexico before the Spaniards came.
The Chihuahua burst onto the national stage as a “must have” dog for two reasons: The “Yo Quiero Taco Bell?” ad campaign and, more recently, the tendency of rich, attractive and famous young women to haul these small dogs with big attitudes around in stylish and expensive oversized purses. The appeal? The tiny (as small as two pounds) Chihuahua offers feistiness coupled with enduring loyalty to the person he chooses as his own, along with an expressive face, including large, round eyes that show everything the dog is thinking.
It is really common. They are Chi’s at heart sometimes and they are bred as lap/companion dogs so they are naturally very protective of their owners. Especially to Larger dogs and humans. What I have found with my baby girl is that she has what I call “big dog syndrome.’ As in she thinks she is much bigger than she is. She’ll get up in another dogs face in a heartbeat if it meant telling them to stay away from me. Once I pet that dog and talk to her when I do it she calms down and after 5-10 minutes she is best friends with them. Humans too. lol. It is just their way of being there for you too. Even if it is unwanted. Best thing is to roll with it and show them its alright and eventually they learn. they are so smart.

Thank you so much for this comment. Professionalism and warmth is part of what we aim for, so we appreciate when it gets recognized. Some contentious topics lead to understandable emotional responses, on both sides. We don't want to offend anyone's views, but our approach will be an unapologetically evidence-based one. Thanks again for your support.

This test is not perfect, but it does go some way to show the importance of treating the dog as an individual. This is the stance of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals which states that ‘genetics do not exist in a vacuum’[2]. Many factors influence a dog's behavior, but this is true of all breeds. More important than breed is adequate socialization, humane treatment and early positive experiences in terms of a dog's aggression. By enforcing breed specific legislation, as pointed out by the ASPCA, you only create the illusion of public safety. By treating dogs on an individual basis you will be better able to stop attacks, prevent purposeful mistreatment and educate owners and the public about how to treat a animals safely and humanely.
The history of the Chihuahua is quite controversial. According to one theory, it was originally developed in China and then brought to the Americas by Spanish traders, where it was interbred with small native dogs. Others speculate it is of South and Central American origin, descended from a small, mute dog -- the native Techichi -- which was occasionally sacrificed in Toltec religious rites. It was believed that this diminutive red dog guided the soul to the underworld after death. Thus, all Aztec families kept this dog and buried it with the deceased member of the family. (Curiously, the Toltecs and the Aztecs also fed on the Techichi.) When not used in burial rituals, however, the Aztec and Toltec priests and families took great care of the Techichis.
There are two Beagle varieties: those standing under 13 inches at the shoulder, and those between 13 and 15 inches. Both varieties are sturdy, solid, and “big for their inches,” as dog folks say. They come in such pleasing colors as lemon, red and white, and tricolor. The Beagle’s fortune is in his adorable face, with its big brown or hazel eyes set off by long, houndy ears set low on a broad head.
Beagles were in the United States by the 1840s at the latest, but the first dogs were imported strictly for hunting and were of variable quality. Since Honeywood had only started breeding in the 1830s, it is unlikely these dogs were representative of the modern breed and the description of them as looking like straight-legged Dachshunds with weak heads has little resemblance to the standard. Serious attempts at establishing a quality bloodline began in the early 1870s when General Richard Rowett from Illinois imported some dogs from England and began breeding. Rowett's Beagles are believed to have formed the models for the first American standard, drawn up by Rowett, L. H. Twadell, and Norman Ellmore in 1887.[17] The beagle was accepted as a breed by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1885.[18] In the 20th century the breed has spread worldwide.
Beagles are intelligent but, as a result of being bred for the long chase, are single-minded and determined, which can make them hard to train. They can be difficult to recall once they have picked up a scent, and are easily distracted by smells around them. They do not generally feature in obedience trials; while they are alert, respond well to food-reward training, and are eager to please, they are easily bored or distracted. They are ranked 72nd in Stanley Coren's The Intelligence of Dogs, as Coren places them among the group with the lowest degree of working/obedience intelligence. Coren's scale, however, does not assess understanding, independence, or creativity.[42][43]
By the fourteenth century, hare-hunting had become a popular sport in England, and the dogs used were probably of Beagle type. The origin of the name Beagle may be from old French words meaning open throat in reference to the breed’s melodious bay, or from the Celtic, old English, or old French words for small. The word Beagle was not used until 1475, however, but can then be found frequently in writings from the sixteenth century on.
Developed from the Bull and Terrier types dogs, the American Pit Bull Terrier can be traced back to the early 1800s in what is now known as the United Kingdom. They were bred as an all-around farm dog, working the farms as a cattle/hog dog. Some chose to turn their talents into the sport of pit-fighting. The breed's tenacity and accompanying strength are unmatched in the canine world. As rich and captivating as the breed's history is, the Pit Bull's future is more worthy of commentary. Some proponents of the breed argue that this breed is the original bulldog of the past. Old prints and woodcarvings show reason to believe this. They show dogs that look exactly like the breed today, doing things the dog is still capable of doing. For more information on this theory you can read books by Richard F. Stratton. The APBT, as registered by the UKC, is an individual breed of dog and does not refer to just any ill-bred, mindless warrior-type mongrel. At one time, the Pit Bull had an all around reputation of a much loved, trustworthy companion. Unfortunately the breed has become a status symbol for many types of criminals who chose to train these dogs to fight. It is those types of people who are chiefly responsible for the banning and witch-hunting that has been sweeping the U.S. The media, however, should not go unmentioned, for it is also responsible for escalating isolated incidences in a relentless and attention-getting way. Most Pit Bulls are bred as family dogs or sports such as weight pulling, but the media will rarely mention this. They get more views pretending all Pit Bulls are bred by fighters. In a lot of cases when the media is reporting about a Pit Bull attacking, it is indeed not even a Pit Bull at all, but a mixed breed of some sort, or another bull breed all together. For example, there was a report on KYW news in Philadelphia about two Pit Bulls attacking a person. The dogs did not look like Pit Bulls, but rather Boxer mixes. The news station was called and asked if they knew the dogs were in fact purebred American Pit Bull Terriers, or another bull breed of some sort, or mutts, for that matter. They stated they did not know, and to call the police station to verify that information. They were asked how they could report something that they were not sure of. They had no answer and they were not sure of the dogs’ breeds. Even after admitting on the phone that they did not in fact know the breeds of the dogs in question, they kept calling the dogs Pit Bulls in their reports. Why? Because the name Pit Bull will draw out the most attention from the public. The Pit Bull's future has been perhaps irreparably undone and everyone is to blame except the dog itself. This very loyal dog is too set on pleasing his owner, and ironically this is the root of his own undoing. Accompanying this need to please are remarkable abilities of all kinds. Jack Dempsy, Teddy Roosevelt and Jack Johnson are just a few people who have owned Pit Bulls. Pit Bulls excel in practically every canine task including herding, guarding, hunting, policing, cart pulling and ratting. A Pit Bull named Banddog Dread holds more canine working titles than ANY other breed. The owner's name is Diane Jessup and you can reference her book "The Working Pit Bull." It tells all of Dread's accomplishments. These dogs are truly capable of many tasks. The difference between Pits and American Staffordshire Terriers is a difficult one. Even breeders can't agree. The main difference is the bloodline. Amstaffs are show dogs and dog fighters usually do not use dogs with Amstaff blood. As time progresses there will be more of a difference. Many are dual registered as Amstaffs with the AKC and Pits with the UKC.
Beagles are pack animals, becoming very attached to their human "pack," and are well-suited to a variety of active families. They are a great choice for families with children. Singles and couples who love the outdoors also match up well with this breed, and his size and even temperament make the Beagle a great companion for active seniors who love to walk but don’t mind going at a slow pace to allow the Beagle to sniff to his heart’s content.
Pit bull is the common name for a type of dog descended from bulldogs and terriers. The pit bull-type is particularly ambiguous, as it encompasses a range of pedigree breeds, informal types and appearances that cannot be reliably identified.[1] Formal breeds often considered to be of the pit bull-type include the American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, American Bully, and Staffordshire Bull Terrier.[2][3][4] The American Bulldog is also sometimes included.[5] Mixed-breed dogs which physically resemble these breeds often get labelled as "pit bulls" by shelters. Many of these breeds were originally developed as fighting dogs from crossbreeding bull-baiting dogs (used to hold the faces and heads of larger animals such as bulls) and terriers.[5] After the use of dogs in blood sports was banned, such dogs were used as catch dogs in the United States for semi-wild cattle and hogs, to hunt and drive livestock, and as family companions.[6] Despite dog fighting now being illegal in the United States, it still exists as an underground activity, and pit bulls are a common type used.[7][8][9]
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