In 1994, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), designed to encourage trade among the United States, Canada and Mexico by eliminating tariffs and lifting many restrictions on various categories of trade goods, went into effect. Because Chihuahua shares a border with the United States, the state experienced tremendous economic growth as a result of the treaty. However, small farmers found that participation in the well-established and competitive North American market was quite difficult.
English and American varieties are sometimes mentioned. However, there is no official recognition from any Kennel Club for this distinction. Beagles fitting the American Kennel Club standard – which disallows animals over 15 inches (38 cm) – are smaller on average than those fitting the Kennel Club standard which allows heights up to 16 inches (41 cm).
I had what I think was a Chihuahua/Cairn Terrier mix but not sure. Her name was Mia and she weighed 7 lbs. I got her from a shelter; she was given up by a young couple when they separated and supposedly she was bought at a puppy mill and was listed as a Chiweenie (but there’s no way!). We got her at 9 months and she was a bit difficult to potty train but we got through it. She loved her cage and got along fabulously with our Golden Retriever. They were buddies. Unfortunately, she darted into the street and someone hit her; she died instantly. I am devastated because she truly was the BEST dog I’ve ever had. She had a HUGE personality for such a tiny dog and she was a loving snuggler who was always there when you needed her. She was killed this week and I am inconsolable. I want another one but I have no idea where to begin.
Whether you’re planning to get your new best friend from a breeder, a pet store, or another source, don’t forget that old adage “let the buyer beware”. Disreputable breeders and facilities that deal with puppy mills can be hard to distinguish from reliable operations. There’s no 100% guaranteed way to make sure you’ll never purchase a sick puppy, but researching the breed (so you know what to expect), checking out the facility (to identify unhealthy conditions or sick animals), and asking the right questions can reduce the chances of heading into a disastrous situation. And don’t forget to ask your veterinarian, who can often refer you to a reputable breeder, breed rescue organization, or other reliable source for healthy puppies.  
Beagles are used as detection dogs in the Beagle Brigade of the United States Department of Agriculture. These dogs are used to detect food items in luggage being taken into the United States. After trialling several breeds, beagles were chosen because they are relatively small and unintimidating for people who are uncomfortable around dogs, easy to care for, intelligent and work well for rewards.[65] They are also used for this purpose in a number of other countries including by the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry in New Zealand, the Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service, and in Canada, Japan and the People's Republic of China.[66] Larger breeds are generally used for detection of explosives as this often involves climbing over luggage and on large conveyor belts, work for which the smaller Beagle is not suited.[67]

"This here is my baby girl Roxy at 2 and a half months old. She is the first Pit I've owned and I must say...I'll never own another breed of dog BUT Pitbulls! I fell in love with the breed 3 years ago when I went on vacation to California (I live in Washington) and I went to a Pitbull rescue... immediately I was surrounded by 15-20 Pitbulls. I've never had so many dogs at once DYING for my attention!!! I knew from that day on there was no other dog I wanted BUT a Pitbull. No one will ever understand a Pitbull unless they own one. The only thing they want in this world, what they live for, is to please you. Make you laugh and just be your companion. There's no such thing as a bad dog... just a bad owner. It frustrates me to hear all these stories about Pitbulls attacking little kids or biting their owners; most of those dogs that you see on the news AREN'T EVEN PITBULLS!!! They are all mostly mutts. How dare someone claim what a Pitbull is when most of those people have never even seen a Pitbull in person. No one believes me when I say Roxy is a purebred because "she's too small to be a purebred Pitbull" when in reality, purebred Pitbull Terriers ARE medium sized dogs—Roxy is 47 pounds now and pure muscle! She's got what I like to call "the Pitbull wiggle" when she gets so excited her whole body wiggles and she "smiles" at me. (I could really go on forever about Roxy!) She warms my heart and I want to cry sometimes just looking at her, and how happy she makes me. They are determined dogs, and have so much passion and fire in their eyes (just like her mamma!). I don't know what I would do without my baby girl!!!"

The smallest breed of dog, the Chihuahua has a controversial history. One theory holds that it originated in China and was brought to the New World by Spanish traders, where it was then crossed with small native dogs. The other theory contends that it originated entirely in Central and South America, descending from the native Techichi. A small red dog was believed to guide the soul to the underworld, and every Aztec family kept such a dog that was buried with any deceased family member. To make matters worse for the Techichi, the Toltecs and their conquerors, the Aztecs, often ate dogs and the Techichi may have sometimes been on the menu. Despite what may have been short lives, the Techichis apparently were well cared for during life by the priests or their families. In fact, the most likely origin of the Chihuahua is a combination of these theories: the native Techichi was probably crossed with tiny hairless Chinese dogs, but again the date when this occurred is controversial.
The Chihuahua's history is convoluted, and many theories surround the origin of the breed. Both folklore and archaeological finds show that the breed has origins in Mexico. The most common theory is that Chihuahua are descended from the Techichi, a companion dog favored by the Toltec civilization in Mexico.[2] No records of the Techichi are available before the 9th century, although dog pots from Colima, Mexico, buried as part of the western Mexico shaft tomb tradition, which date back to 300 BC, are thought to depict Techichis.[3] The earlier ancestors probably were present before the Mayas as dogs approximating the Chihuahua are found in materials from the Great Pyramid of Cholula, antedating 1530 and in the ruins of Chichen Itza on the Yucatán Peninsula.[2] However, a genetic study indicated that there was less than 2 percent pre-European mitochondrial DNA in modern Chihuahuas due to admixture with the European dogs.[4]
"Yaya is a 5-year-old APBT my wife and I rescued from the Humane Society in Erie, PA. She is great with other dogs and especially a real lover when it comes to people. She is very loyal and loves to smother us with Pitbull kisses. Having gone through a tragic loss in the family a couple of years ago, she has been the best 'therapist' one could ask for. She can be stubborn sometimes; that trait she gets from my wife!"
Air France Safety Category 1 dogs, as defined by the French Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Forestry, are not permitted for transport in the cabin, or as baggage or cargo. These so-called "attack dogs" do not belong to a particular breed, but are similar in morphology to the following: Staffordshire Bull Terriers or American Staffordshire Terriers (pit bulls), Mastiffs and Tosas.[70]
My rescue is Iggyboo, a cairn terrier/Chihuahua mix, weighing in at 10 lbs and only 8 inches tall, now at almost 3 yrs. He is very protective and loyal, and pretty much a lap dog. He loves to play with his toys, and is highly intelligent, often preferring his interactive toys over stuffed ones. I find myself constantly teaching him new words or playing new games. He hates children and often adults, but can warm up to people given a few minutes and a few kind words (treats help this process). He also can be a challenge to walk, being aggressive to other dogs, but responds very well to a clicker and a treat for distraction. So, generally I have had no issues with him on walks, but am always careful. He loves bedtime, and burrows under the covers, sleeping a full 8 hours straight, he gets upset if I roll over and wake him up and will growl at me, lol.
The Beagle is a social dog that is particularly well suited to the company of humans and other dogs alike. It also needs to spend equal time in the yard as it does in the house. Regular exercise, such as a romp at the park or in a spacious yard area, along with regular leash-led walks are great outdoor activities for the Beagle. This breed can withstand temperate climates and live outdoors most seasons, as long as it has bedding and an enclosed, warm shelter. With its short, close coat, the Beagle does not require extensive grooming. An occasional brushing to encourage turnover of hair, and to minimize hair buildup in the house is all that is needed to keep your Beagle looking healthy and vibrant.
The American Pit Bull Terrier (APBT) is one of the most most popular dog breeds. Unfortunately, even after long periods of domestication, there is still a lot of controversy surrounding them and related Pit Bull breeds. This is often due to misunderstanding and misinterpretation of their nature. The truth is that Pit Bull breeds can be among the most loving, affectionate, loyal and beautiful companions a person can have.
The beagle has an even temper and gentle disposition. Described in several breed standards as "merry", they are amiable and typically neither aggressive nor timid, although this depends on the individual. They enjoy company, and although they may initially be standoffish with strangers, they are easily won over. They make poor guard dogs for this reason, although their tendency to bark or howl when confronted with the unfamiliar makes them good watch dogs. In a 1985 study conducted by Ben and Lynette Hart, the beagle was given the highest excitability rating, along with the Yorkshire Terrier, Cairn Terrier, Miniature Schnauzer, West Highland White Terrier, and Fox Terrier.[41][c]
Pit bulls also constitute the majority of dogs used for illegal dog fighting in America.[10] In addition, law enforcement organisations report these dogs are used for other nefarious purposes, such as guarding illegal narcotics operations.[11][12] use against police,[13] and as attack dogs.[14] On the other side of the law, pit bulls have been used as police dogs.[15][16]

Contrary to popular myth, pit bulls do not have "locking jaws".[44] There is no physiological "locking mechanism" in the jaw muscle and bone structure of pit bulls or other dogs.[45] Pit bull-type dogs, like other terriers, hunting and bull-baiting breeds,[46] can exhibit a bite, hold, and shake behavior and at times refuse to release.[12][47][48] Pit bulls also have wide skulls, well-developed facial muscles, and strong jaws,[44] and some research suggests that pit bull bites are particularly serious because they tend to bite deeply and grind their molars into tissue.[49] Breaking an ammonia ampule and holding it up to the dog's nose can cause the dog to release its hold.[47]
In the Smooth Coats, the coat should be of soft texture, close and glossy. (Heavier coats with undercoats permissible.) Coat placed well over body with ruff on neck preferred, and more scanty on head and ears. Hair on tail preferred furry. In Long Coats, the coat should be of a soft texture, either flat or slightly wavy, with undercoat preferred. Ears – Fringed. Tail – Full and long (as a plume). Feathering on feet and legs, pants on hind legs and large ruff on the neck desired and preferred. (The Chihuahua should be groomed only to create a neat appearance.) Disqualification – In Long Coats, too thin coat that resembles bareness.

In an effort to counter the fighting reputation of pit bull-type dogs, in 1996 the San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals renamed pit bull terriers "St. Francis Terriers", so that people might be more likely to adopt them.[17] 60 temperament-screened dogs were adopted until the program was halted, after several of the newly adopted pit bulls killed cats.[18] The New York City Center for Animal Care and Control tried a similar approach in 2004, relabeling their pit bulls as "New Yorkies", but dropped the idea in the face of overwhelming public opposition.[19][20]
Leaping from your arms. Some Chihuahuas melt into your arms and stay there, but many are wriggly. They can be deceptive about it, too, apparently settling into your arms with contentment, then suddenly launching themselves through the air if you relax your grip. A fall from a few feet up, especially over a hard surface, can result in a broken leg or concussion. Hold on tight if you pick up a Chihuahua over concrete.

Due to their athleticism and diverse breeding background, the Pit Bull breed tends to be hardy, with an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, longer than many breeds of a similar size. There are some genetic conditions to be watchful for. The Pit Bull tends to suffer from bone diseases such as hip dysplasia, degenerative myelopathy and kneecap dislocation. The Pit Bull can also suffer from skin problems, such as mange and skin allergies, because of its short coat. Other health ailments seen in Pit Bulls include thyroid and congenital heart defects.

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