Chihuahuas require regular grooming with a brush and comb for their long coat. The Chihuahua’s claws must be kept trimmed, and its teeth must be checked frequently for tartar buildup. Chihuahuas get cold easily and should be kept in a warm environment. The small nose may cause wheezing or snoring. The Chihuahua should not be overfed. There is typically a soft spot on the top of the skull; this is normal and is usually closed by adulthood. The Chihuahua has a long life span at 14-18 years.
During the Mexican Revolution, which began in 1910, Chihuahua was again a central battleground. Peasant revolutionary leader Francisco “Pancho” Villa fought throughout Chihuahua, demanding that the peasants be apportioned land and be recognized as legitimate participants in Mexican politics. Villa’s famous Northern Division was first assembled in Chihuahua.
Reality: Pit Bulls do not have any special physical mechanism or enzyme that allows them to “lock” their jaws. If you compare a Pit Bull skull to a skull of any other dog breed, you can see with the naked eye that both skulls share the same characteristics and general bone structure. However, one personality trait of the Pit Bull breed is determination. Whatever Pit Bulls do, they do it with a great deal of enthusiasm, and it is this trait that can make it seem like they have a locking jaw when they bite down on something and are determined not to release it.
Pit bull is the common name for a type of dog descended from bulldogs and terriers. The pit bull-type is particularly ambiguous, as it encompasses a range of pedigree breeds, informal types and appearances that cannot be reliably identified.[1] Formal breeds often considered to be of the pit bull-type include the American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, American Bully, and Staffordshire Bull Terrier.[2][3][4] The American Bulldog is also sometimes included.[5] Mixed-breed dogs which physically resemble these breeds often get labelled as "pit bulls" by shelters. Many of these breeds were originally developed as fighting dogs from crossbreeding bull-baiting dogs (used to hold the faces and heads of larger animals such as bulls) and terriers.[5] After the use of dogs in blood sports was banned, such dogs were used as catch dogs in the United States for semi-wild cattle and hogs, to hunt and drive livestock, and as family companions.[6] Despite dog fighting now being illegal in the United States, it still exists as an underground activity, and pit bulls are a common type used.[7][8][9]
And before you decide to buy a puppy, consider whether an adult Beagle might better suit your needs and lifestyle. Puppies are loads of fun, but they require a lot of time and effort before they grow up to become the dog of your dreams. An adult Beagle may already have some training and will probably be less active, destructive and demanding than a puppy. With an adult, you know more about what you’re getting in terms of personality and health and you can find adults through breeders or shelters. If you are interested in acquiring an older dog through breeders, ask them about purchasing a retired show dog or if they know of an adult dog who needs a new home. If you want to adopt a dog, read the advice below on how to do that.
I was sure that I had some sort of Yorkie/Cairn Terrier mix. Just on a whim and when there was a sale, I ordered a DNA kit through wisdom panel. Imagine my surprise when it came back that Piper Is 62.5% Chihuahua and 37.5% something in the sporting group. That explains the loud bark. I believe she is long-haired Chihuahua because of her thick coat. I rescued her after she was found under a dumpster. She will warm up to another animal but it takes some time.
With a compact size, easy-care coat and happy nature, the Beagle has long had a place as one of the most popular breeds for families. Beagles are also used as scent detection dogs at U.S. airports, where their friendliness allows them to search for weapons, drugs, and illegal food items without making passengers nervous the way a larger “police dog” might. The breed was developed in England to hunt rabbits, and Beagles are still happiest when following their noses. For that reason, they belong to a category of dogs known as scenthounds.
When the Spanish first arrived in Chihuahua, more than 200 indigenous groups, including Native Americans, already inhabited the area. Although little of this period’s history is recorded, archeologists have found evidence of inhabitants dating as far back as 3,000 years. Some of these tribes include the Tarahumara (Raramuri), Apache, Comanche and Guarojío. For several thousand years, indigenous groups living in Chihuahua maintained trading relations with groups in other areas. Perhaps the most notable inhabitants were the Tarahumara (Raramuri), a people whose rich spiritual ideology, passive resistance and strong cultural identity enabled them to persevere despite foreign intrusions. Other tribes, like the warlike Apache, were overwhelmed and eventually assimilated after the arrival of the Spaniards.

The Chihuahua (affectionately called 'Chi') may descend either from tiny, hairless Chinese dogs or the South American 'Techichi', a favored pet which was buried with the deceased in the hope they would lead the way to the afterlife. Modern Chihuahuas hail from Chihuahua, Mexico. They are the smallest dog breed and the oldest North American breed. They rocketed to popularity in the U.S when famous Latin musician Xavier Cugat made a Chihuahua his constant public companion, and remain extremely popular to this day. Famous Chihuahuas include the Taco Bell Chihuahua, Ren from 'Ren and Stimpy', and Ducky, the 2007 ‘Guinness Book of World Records’ winner for ‘World's Smallest Living Dog’.


We own a 10 lb chi/terrier mix who has some serious itchy under belly hair loss going on. She has tested negative for allergies and has been on hydrolyzed food now for a month with no changes to her hair loss. She also takes appoquel daily. Along with this, she will randomly pee in the house. She seems like a very bright dog, so this trait is very frustrating. Not sure what the next step will be but would appreciate hearing from others in this situation.
In Beagles, you should expect to see health clearances from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) for hip dysplasia (with a score of fair or better), elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand's disease; from Auburn University for thrombopathia; and from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF) certifying that eyes are normal. You can confirm health clearances by checking the OFA web site (offa.org).
In a 2014 literature review of dog bite studies, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) states that breed is a poor sole predictor of dog bites.[36] Controlled studies have not identified pit bulls as disproportionately dangerous. Pit bull-type dogs are more frequently identified with cases involving very severe injuries or fatalities than other breeds, but the review suggests this may relate to the popularity of the breed, noting that sled dogs, such as Siberian Huskies, were involved in a majority of fatal dog attacks in some areas of Canada.[1] Bite statistics by breed are not tracked by the CDC[37], AVMA[38] or the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA).[39] State Farm Insurance spokeswoman Heather Paul stated "Pit bulls in particular are often misidentified when a bite incident occurs, so reliable bite statistics related to the dogs’ breed are unreliable and serve no purpose."[40] The White House stated that "the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looked at twenty years of data about dog bites and human fatalities in the United States. They found that fatal attacks represent a very small proportion of dog bite injuries to people and that it’s virtually impossible to calculate bite rates for specific breeds". [41]
By the fourteenth century, hare-hunting had become a popular sport in England, and the dogs used were probably of Beagle type. The origin of the name Beagle may be from old French words meaning open throat in reference to the breed’s melodious bay, or from the Celtic, old English, or old French words for small. The word Beagle was not used until 1475, however, but can then be found frequently in writings from the sixteenth century on.
This is the oldest breed on the American continent and the smallest breed in the world. Native to Mexico, where it received its name from the Mexican State of Chihuahua. It was only brought to Europe at the end of the nineteenth century. The breeds that were used to make up the Chihuahua are unclear, but some think it originated from the Fennec Fox. The dogs were sacred to Pre-Columbian Indian nations and were also popular pets to the upper class. The dogs are prized for their size and are most valued to some fanciers when they weigh under 2-1/4 pounds (1.3 kg).

In the Smooth Coats, the coat should be of soft texture, close and glossy. (Heavier coats with undercoats permissible.) Coat placed well over body with ruff on neck preferred, and more scanty on head and ears. Hair on tail preferred furry. In Long Coats, the coat should be of a soft texture, either flat or slightly wavy, with undercoat preferred. Ears – Fringed. Tail – Full and long (as a plume). Feathering on feet and legs, pants on hind legs and large ruff on the neck desired and preferred. (The Chihuahua should be groomed only to create a neat appearance.) Disqualification – In Long Coats, too thin coat that resembles bareness.

A well rounded “apple dome” skull, with or without molera. Expression – Saucy. Eyes – Full, round, but not protruding, balanced, set well apart-luminous dark or luminous ruby. Light eyes in blond or white-colored dogs permissible. Blue eyes or a difference in the color of the iris in the two eyes, or two different colors within one iris should be considered a serious fault. Ears – Large, erect type ears, held more upright when alert, but flaring to the sides at a 45 degree angle when in repose, giving breadth between the ears. Stop – Well defined. When viewed in profile, it forms a near 90 degree angle where muzzle joins skull.
Due to their athleticism and diverse breeding background, the Pit Bull breed tends to be hardy, with an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, longer than many breeds of a similar size. There are some genetic conditions to be watchful for. The Pit Bull tends to suffer from bone diseases such as hip dysplasia, degenerative myelopathy and kneecap dislocation. The Pit Bull can also suffer from skin problems, such as mange and skin allergies, because of its short coat. Other health ailments seen in Pit Bulls include thyroid and congenital heart defects. 
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