The longcoated Chihuahua is the product of a recessive gene, meaning a puppy must have the gene from both parents for the long coat to express itself, so he isn’t seen in litters as frequently as the smooth. The long, soft coat is flat or slightly curly, and the dog has a ruff around the neck, fringed ears, feathering on the legs and a plumed tail. The hair on the rest of the body is almost as smooth as that on the smooth Chihuahua. Longcoated Chihuahuas are beautiful, and they’re easy to groom, but they do shed seasonally.
With a compact size, easy-care coat and happy nature, the Beagle has long had a place as one of the most popular breeds for families. Beagles are also used as scent detection dogs at U.S. airports, where their friendliness allows them to search for weapons, drugs, and illegal food items without making passengers nervous the way a larger “police dog” might. The breed was developed in England to hunt rabbits, and Beagles are still happiest when following their noses. For that reason, they belong to a category of dogs known as scenthounds.
In 1916, five members of the National Beagle Club purchased 508 acres in Western Loudoun County, Virginia for the purpose of holding field trials. The men who purchased it formed a corporation called Institute Corporate to purchase and own the land, then leasing it to the Institute Foundation that maintains the property for the National Beagle Club, which today is the site of many activities of the National Beagle Club.
And, as far as dogs are concerned, I would love love to have a Bully friend :-) Currently I am mostly thinking between American Staffordshire Terrier, American Pit Bull or American Bulldog. American Bulldogs I know pretty well, Staffordshire some and with the Am. Pit Bulls I haven't had longer experiences. So, please, if you have some article or words of advice which could draw some more detailed comparison, please share. I have of course googled it all, but it all comes down to similar as I thought – they are similar in temperament, only American Bulldogs are better guards and generally a bit calmer/slower (more mastif, less terrier). All of them very gentle, loving, athletic. Is there something more or different you would say?
The Beagle should do well on a high-quality dog food, whether commercially manufactured or home-prepared with your veterinarian’s supervision and approval. Any diet should be appropriate to the dog’s age (puppy, adult, or senior). Some dogs are prone to getting overweight, so watch your dog’s calorie consumption and weight level. Treats can be an important aid in training, but giving too many can cause obesity. Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times.
The terrier mix dogs that we see and know today have a long breeding history. During the early 18th century, the terriers were crossed with hunting (explains their great sense of smell) or fighting (explains their guarding nature) dogs. This was done to improve their ability to hunt (either on land or in waters) or fight. By the 19th century, dog shows began to be organized, which resulted in careful and purposeful breeding. Since then, breeders started to breed dogs mainly as pets.
Well, there are a lot of things to love about terriers and terrier mixes. They are known for their spunky tenacity, which can be heart-warming, hilarious and occasionally inspiring. They are also very bright, the result of generations of terrier being used for hunting. What you might not know is that they have a long history of bravery. In fact, there have been a number of terriers that have served in the armed forces and police departments. On top of that, they have been guarding households for centuries.
The Chihuahua's history is convoluted, and many theories surround the origin of the breed. Both folklore and archaeological finds show that the breed has origins in Mexico. The most common theory is that Chihuahua are descended from the Techichi, a companion dog favored by the Toltec civilization in Mexico.[2] No records of the Techichi are available before the 9th century, although dog pots from Colima, Mexico, buried as part of the western Mexico shaft tomb tradition, which date back to 300 BC, are thought to depict Techichis.[3] The earlier ancestors probably were present before the Mayas as dogs approximating the Chihuahua are found in materials from the Great Pyramid of Cholula, antedating 1530 and in the ruins of Chichen Itza on the Yucatán Peninsula.[2] However, a genetic study indicated that there was less than 2 percent pre-European mitochondrial DNA in modern Chihuahuas due to admixture with the European dogs.[4]
Not every Beagle visit to the vet is for a genetic problem. The Beagle’s long, floppy ears are prone to chronic ear infections. Left untreated, such infections can cause permanent damage to the ear canal and even destroy your dog's hearing. Checking ears often and seeing the veterinarian at the first whiff of a problem combined with good follow-through will keep a Beagle’s ears from being an expensive and painful problem.
Beagles bond with everyone in the family, especially children. They can be rambunctious when playing, however, so they need to be properly socialized and supervised with very young children. In addition, Beagles tend to be "mouthy," grabbing things, including your or your child's hand, with their mouths to play. They do this in fun and can be trained not to do this.

English and American varieties are sometimes mentioned. However, there is no official recognition from any Kennel Club for this distinction. Beagles fitting the American Kennel Club standard – which disallows animals over 15 inches (38 cm) – are smaller on average than those fitting the Kennel Club standard which allows heights up to 16 inches (41 cm).

Unfortunately, Chihuahuas under 2 or 3 lbs are at greater risk when it comes to health. Their bones are more fragile. There isn't enough room in their mouth for healthy teeth. They can have difficulty regulating their blood sugar and can go into hypoglycemic shock if they go too long without eating. Their internal organs are often weak and can fail suddenly – you might come downstairs one morning and find them inexplicably dead in their basket.
In rare cases, beagles may develop immune mediated polygenic arthritis (where the immune system attacks the joints) even at a young age. The symptoms can sometimes be relieved by steroid treatments.[49] Another rare disease in the breed is neonatal cerebellar cortical degeneration. Affected puppies are slow, have lower co-ordination, fall more often and don't have a normal gait. It has an estimated carrier rate of 5% and affected rate of 0.1%. A genetic test is available.[53][54]
Alongside the Bloodhound and Basset Hound, the beagle has one of the best developed senses of smell of any dog.[35] In the 1950s, John Paul Scott and John Fuller began a 13-year study of canine behavior. As part of this research, they tested the scenting abilities of various breeds by putting a mouse in a one-acre field and timing how long it took the dogs to find it. The beagles found it in less than a minute, while Fox Terriers took 15 minutes and Scottish Terriers failed to find it at all. Beagles are better at ground-scenting (following a trail on the ground) than they are at air-scenting, and for this reason they have been excluded from most mountain rescue teams in favor of collies, which use sight in addition to air-scenting and are more biddable.[35] The long ears and large lips of the beagle probably assist in trapping the scents close to the nose.[36]
Dog breeds are usually categorized by the functional type from which the breed was developed. The basic types are companion dogs, guard dogs, hunting dogs, herding dogs and working dogs. Breeds listed here may be traditional breeds with long histories as registered breeds, rare breeds with their own registries, or new breeds that may still be under development. In some cases, a breed's origin overlaps the boundaries of two or more countries; the dog is normally listed only in the country with which it is most commonly associated; for example, by its designated country according to the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI). Some dogs, such as the Löwchen, have an uncertain origin and are thus listed under several countries.
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