Just like Apple Head and Deer Head Chihuahuas, Teacup Chihuahuas are from the same breed but have a different appearance. A Teacup Chihuahua on average doesn’t weigh more than four pounds. In a household they may need a little more looking after due to their small size. Teacup Chihuahuas can have either short or long hair. Although a Teacup is much smaller in size, they still have the same confident and energetic personality as a full sized Chihuahua. It is also very risky for Teacup Chihuahuas to have puppies due to their size. It can cause many complications and put their life at risk. [34] Compared to the typical lifespan of a Chihuahua a Teacup's lifespan tends to be much shorter due to the health issues they are more prone to have because of their small size.[35]
If you live in a cold or rainy climate, housebreaking will be especially difficult, because Chihuahuas hate both the cold and the rain. In these climates, a COVERED potty area is strongly recommended. Sometimes a doggy door is necessary so your Chihuahua can run outside the moment he feels the urge in his tiny bladder. An indoor litterbox is another option.
Avoid breeders who only seem interested in how quickly they can unload a puppy on you and whether your credit card will go through. You should also bear in mind that buying a puppy from websites that offer to ship your dog to you immediately can be a risky venture, as it leaves you no recourse if what you get isn’t exactly what you expected. Put at least as much effort into researching your puppy as you would into choosing a new car or expensive appliance. It will save you money in the long run. For more information about the breed or to find a list of breeders, visit the website of the National Beagle Club.
I wish I knew what my precious little girl is. She looks like a chihuahua terrier mix, but I have no way of checking. I am her third mom and she is so smart, has the knee slip thing and probably the cough thing. She follows me around all the time and loves to chase squirrels. She weighs 7 lbs, has floppy ears, light brown legs and black and brown hair on her back. She’s two years old has a brown black and white muzzle with large brown eyes and cutest face. Also she is short haired. I don’t know how to put a picture here or I would.
These dogs are skillful, long living, and have a temperament which simply suits humans. They developed a solid red color later in their evolution before which, they were gray and brindle. They are also known for their courage and dominance, which is paired with a peaceful and eager-to-please attitude that they have towards the family members. Being a hyper breed, mental and physical exercises are essential. Overall, they are loyal, intelligent, and great as watchdogs.
Beagles bond with everyone in the family, especially children. They can be rambunctious when playing, however, so they need to be properly socialized and supervised with very young children. In addition, Beagles tend to be "mouthy," grabbing things, including your or your child's hand, with their mouths to play. They do this in fun and can be trained not to do this.

I have a, what i am discovering a Ratcha…she is intelligent, housebroke at 3 months, and at first frightened by children. But my job and life evolve around children. Now she loves them. Some people she does not like, no matter how hard they try to warm up to her. But once she likes you, she really likes you. She has anxieties over several things. Before a long car ride I have to give her melatonin. Loud noise petrifies her. She loves to cuddle up in the warm blankets as soon as they come out of the dryer. She burrows underneath her blankets…the warmer the better. She chases the cats, but doesnt hurt them. She barks alot, but a bark collar helps. She chokes easy, so you have to put on a vest type collar when going for walks. She follows me to every room…no matter. If I put on a space heater, shes the first one there. The cats are no match with her in catching mice. She has it within seconds of its being in the open. Shes fast! She loves squeaky toys, but wants you to throw it, and fight her for it. Then she shakes it to death! Shes extremely loyal to me. Her name is Gidget, and I love this little dog with all my heart.
Hip Dysplasia: This is an inherited condition in which the thighbone doesn't fit snugly into the hip joint. Some dogs show pain and lameness on one or both rear legs, but others don't display outward signs of discomfort. (X-ray screening is the most certain way to diagnose the problem.) Either way, arthritis can develop as the dog ages. Dogs with hip dysplasia should not be bred — so if you're buying a puppy, ask the breeder for proof that the parents have been tested for hip dysplasia and are free of problems.
Reality: This is a stereotype that is biased toward generalizing and condemning an entire breed based on the actions of a few bad people. The truth is that each dog should be evaluated by his own merits and not by his breed. A corollary truth is that there truly are no bad dogs, only bad people. In his essay Troublemakers, Malcolm Gladwell discusses what Pit Bull stereotypes can teach us about the wrongness of racial profiling of both humans and dogs.
Not every Beagle visit to the vet is for a genetic problem. The Beagle’s long, floppy ears are prone to chronic ear infections. Left untreated, such infections can cause permanent damage to the ear canal and even destroy your dog's hearing. Checking ears often and seeing the veterinarian at the first whiff of a problem combined with good follow-through will keep a Beagle’s ears from being an expensive and painful problem.

A well rounded “apple dome” skull, with or without molera. Expression – Saucy. Eyes – Full, round, but not protruding, balanced, set well apart-luminous dark or luminous ruby. Light eyes in blond or white-colored dogs permissible. Blue eyes or a difference in the color of the iris in the two eyes, or two different colors within one iris should be considered a serious fault. Ears – Large, erect type ears, held more upright when alert, but flaring to the sides at a 45 degree angle when in repose, giving breadth between the ears. Stop – Well defined. When viewed in profile, it forms a near 90 degree angle where muzzle joins skull.
Beagles are used as detection dogs in the Beagle Brigade of the United States Department of Agriculture. These dogs are used to detect food items in luggage being taken into the United States. After trialling several breeds, beagles were chosen because they are relatively small and unintimidating for people who are uncomfortable around dogs, easy to care for, intelligent and work well for rewards.[65] They are also used for this purpose in a number of other countries including by the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry in New Zealand, the Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service, and in Canada, Japan and the People's Republic of China.[66] Larger breeds are generally used for detection of explosives as this often involves climbing over luggage and on large conveyor belts, work for which the smaller Beagle is not suited.[67]
Reality: This is a stereotype that is biased toward generalizing and condemning an entire breed based on the actions of a few bad people. The truth is that each dog should be evaluated by his own merits and not by his breed. A corollary truth is that there truly are no bad dogs, only bad people. In his essay Troublemakers, Malcolm Gladwell discusses what Pit Bull stereotypes can teach us about the wrongness of racial profiling of both humans and dogs.
Unfortunately, Chihuahuas under 2 or 3 lbs are at greater risk when it comes to health. Their bones are more fragile. There isn't enough room in their mouth for healthy teeth. They can have difficulty regulating their blood sugar and can go into hypoglycemic shock if they go too long without eating. Their internal organs are often weak and can fail suddenly – you might come downstairs one morning and find them inexplicably dead in their basket.
The merle coat pattern, which appears mottled, is not traditionally considered part of the breed standard. In May 2007, The Kennel Club decided not to register puppies with this coloration due to the health risks associated with the responsible gene, and in December of that year, formally amended its breed standard to disqualify merle dogs.[20] The Fédération Cynologique Internationale, which represents the major kennel clubs of 84 countries, also disqualified merle.[16] Other countries' kennel clubs, including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Germany, have also disqualified merle. However, in May 2008, the Chihuahua Club of America voted that merles would not be disqualified in the United States, and would be fully registrable and able to compete in AKC events. Opponents of merle recognition suspect the coloration came about by modern crossbreeding with other dogs and not by natural genetic drift.[21][citation needed]
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