I have a 10 year old rat terrier-chihuahua mix who is 17 pounds. He is the sweetest dog I have ever met. He loves people and follows me everywhere around the house. He sleeps most of the day but he needs a daily dose of playtime. The only negative is that he can get aggressive toward other dogs (especially big ones!). But other than that, he is such a sweet and loving companion.
I had what I think was a Chihuahua/Cairn Terrier mix but not sure. Her name was Mia and she weighed 7 lbs. I got her from a shelter; she was given up by a young couple when they separated and supposedly she was bought at a puppy mill and was listed as a Chiweenie (but there’s no way!). We got her at 9 months and she was a bit difficult to potty train but we got through it. She loved her cage and got along fabulously with our Golden Retriever. They were buddies. Unfortunately, she darted into the street and someone hit her; she died instantly. I am devastated because she truly was the BEST dog I’ve ever had. She had a HUGE personality for such a tiny dog and she was a loving snuggler who was always there when you needed her. She was killed this week and I am inconsolable. I want another one but I have no idea where to begin.

Glaucoma: This is a painful disease in which pressure in the eye becomes abnormally high. Eyes are constantly producing and draining a fluid called aqueous humor — if the fluid doesn't drain correctly, the pressure inside the eye increases causing damage to the optic nerve and resulting in vision loss and blindness. There are two types. Primary glaucoma, which is hereditary, and secondary glaucoma which is a result of inflammation, a tumor, or injury. Glaucoma generally affects one eye first, which will be red, teary, squinty, and appear painful. A dilated pupil won't react to light, and the front of the eye will have a whitish, almost blue cloudiness. Vision loss and eventually blindness will result, sometimes even with treatment (surgery or medication, depending on the case).
While there are different types of Pit Bulls, they do share some common characteristics. Pit Bull breeds are generally muscular dogs with a strong bite and, unfortunately, a bad reputation with some. Incorrect information about Pit Bull attacks or sensationalized stories contribute to this situation. However, much of this has to do with the terrible abuse individuals have suffered at the hands of many owners who have historically engaged them in the vile practice of dog fighting. This does not mean that Staffies, for example, are inherently dangerous dogs.
Small, compact, and hardy, Beagles are active companions for kids and adults alike. Canines in this dog breed are merry and fun loving, but being hounds, they can also be stubborn and require patient, creative training techniques. Their noses guide them through life, and they’re never happier than when following an interesting scent. The Beagle originally was bred as a scenthound to track small game, mostly rabbits and hare. He is still used for this purpose in many countries, including the United States.
The Chihuahua is a good companion dog. Courageous, extremely lively, proud and adventurous, they enjoy affection. Brave, cheerful and agile, Chihuahuas can be strong-willed without proper human leadership. They are loyal and become attached to their owners. Some like to lick their owner's faces. Socialize them well. For some, they may be slightly difficult to train, but they are intelligent, learn quickly, and respond well to proper, firm but gentle (positive reinforcement) training. May be difficult to housebreak. Do not let the Chihuahua get away with things you would not allow a large dog to do (Small Dog Syndrome), such as jumping up on humans. While it may be cute for a 5-pound tiny dog to put his paws on your leg when you come home from work, it is allowing a dominant behavior. If you allow this little dog to be your pack leader it will develop many behavior issues such as jealousy, aggression with other dogs and sometimes with humans, and will become undeniably suspicious of people except for its owner. When strangers are present, it will begin to follow its owner's every move, keeping as close as possible. A Chihuahua that is pack leader of its humans may snap at children. This breed is generally not recommended for children, not because it is not good with them, but because most people treat the Chihuahua differently than they would a large dog, causing it to become untrustworthy. Because of its size, this breed tends to be babied and things we humans clearly see as bad behavior for a large dog are looked over as cute with a small dog. Small dogs also tend to be walked less, as humans assume they get enough exercise just running around during the day. However, a walk provides more than just exercise. It provides mental stimulation and satisfies the migration instinct all dogs have. Because of this, small breeds such as the Chihuahua tend to become snappish, yappy, protective and untrustworthy with kids and humans they do not know. Chihuahuas that are their human's pack leader tend to be fairly dog-aggressive. An owner who realizes this and treats the Chihuahua no differently than they would a large breed, becoming a clear pack leader, will get a different, more appealing temperament out of this wonderful little dog, finding it to be a good little child companion.

Start training early, be patient and be consistent, and one day you will wake up to find that you live with a great dog. But even so, there are a few Beagle behaviors that you should expect to live with throughout his life. They are part and parcel of being a Beagle, and nothing you do will change them. Beagles love good smells, Beagles howl, Beagles have selective hearing, and Beagles love to eat.
From medieval times, beagle was used as a generic description for the smaller hounds, though these dogs differed considerably from the modern breed. Miniature breeds of beagle-type dogs were known from the times of Edward II and Henry VII, who both had packs of Glove Beagles, so named since they were small enough to fit on a glove, and Queen Elizabeth I kept a breed known as a Pocket Beagle, which stood 8 to 9 inches (20 to 23 cm) at the shoulder. Small enough to fit in a "pocket" or saddlebag, they rode along on the hunt. The larger hounds would run the prey to ground, then the hunters would release the small dogs to continue the chase through underbrush. Elizabeth I referred to the dogs as her singing beagles and often entertained guests at her royal table by letting her Pocket Beagles cavort amid their plates and cups.[6] 19th-century sources refer to these breeds interchangeably and it is possible that the two names refer to the same small variety. In George Jesse's Researches into the History of the British Dog from 1866, the early 17th-century poet and writer Gervase Markham is quoted referring to the beagle as small enough to sit on a man's hand and to the:
Some dog experts say they were among the first native dogs of the Americas, others that they were brought to the New World after the Spanish conquest of Mexico. Still others believe the little dogs may have originated as miniaturized versions of pariah dogs, the nondescript brown dogs with prick ears that result when dogs are left to breed on their own with no selection for color or other specific characteristics. Whatever the case, the breed takes its name from the state of Chihuahua, where late-19th-century American tourists first encountered the tiny canines.
Finding the right Chihuahua puppy can be dog gone hard work. PuppyFind® provides a convenient and efficient means of selecting and purchasing the perfect Chihuahua puppy (or Chihuahua puppies) from the comfort of your home, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Take advantage of our PuppySearch or leisurely browse our directory of hundreds of dog breeds, Chihuahua dog breeders, Chihuahua dogs for adoption, and Chihuahua puppy for sale listings with photos and detailed descriptions. Some Chihuahua puppies for sale may be shipped Worldwide and include crate and veterinarian checkup. Many Chihuahua dog breeders with puppies for sale also offer a health guarantee. With thousands of Chihuahua puppies for sale and hundreds of Chihuahua dog breeders, you're sure to find the perfect Chihuahua puppy.
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