I have a, what i am discovering a Ratcha…she is intelligent, housebroke at 3 months, and at first frightened by children. But my job and life evolve around children. Now she loves them. Some people she does not like, no matter how hard they try to warm up to her. But once she likes you, she really likes you. She has anxieties over several things. Before a long car ride I have to give her melatonin. Loud noise petrifies her. She loves to cuddle up in the warm blankets as soon as they come out of the dryer. She burrows underneath her blankets…the warmer the better. She chases the cats, but doesnt hurt them. She barks alot, but a bark collar helps. She chokes easy, so you have to put on a vest type collar when going for walks. She follows me to every room…no matter. If I put on a space heater, shes the first one there. The cats are no match with her in catching mice. She has it within seconds of its being in the open. Shes fast! She loves squeaky toys, but wants you to throw it, and fight her for it. Then she shakes it to death! Shes extremely loyal to me. Her name is Gidget, and I love this little dog with all my heart.
Air France Safety Category 1 dogs, as defined by the French Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Forestry, are not permitted for transport in the cabin, or as baggage or cargo. These so-called "attack dogs" do not belong to a particular breed, but are similar in morphology to the following: Staffordshire Bull Terriers or American Staffordshire Terriers (pit bulls), Mastiffs and Tosas.[70]
The skull should be fairly long, slightly domed at occiput, with cranium broad and full. Ears-Ears set on moderately low, long, reaching when drawn out nearly, if not quite, to the end of the nose; fine in texture, fairly broad-with almost entire absence of erectile power-setting close to the head, with the forward edge slightly inturning to the cheek-rounded at tip. Eyes-Eyes large, set well apart-soft and houndlike-expression gentle and pleading; of a brown or hazel color. Muzzle-Muzzle of medium length-straight and square-cut-the stop moderately defined. Jaws-Level. Lips free from flews; nostrils large and open. Defects-A very flat skull, narrow across the top; excess of dome, eyes small, sharp and terrierlike, or prominent and protruding; muzzle long, snipy or cut away decidedly below the eyes, or very short. Roman-nosed, or upturned, giving a dish-face expression. Ears short, set on high or with a tendency to rise above the point of origin.

The biggest trick to training a Beagle is to make everything you do with him seem like fun. Never try to force a Beagle to do anything, and never count on a Beagle to be obedient unless you can offer treats as an incentive. This is one breed where it’s important to keep in mind that old saying about catching more flies with honey than with vinegar.
Not all of these conditions are detectable in a growing puppy, and it is impossible to predict whether an animal will be free of these maladies, which is why you must find a reputable breeder who is committed to breeding the healthiest animals possible.  They should be able to produce independent certification that the parents of the dog (and grandparents, etc.) have been screened for common defects and deemed healthy for breeding. That’s where health registries come in.
In March I adopted what was thought to be a “Chihuahua/Cairn Terrier” cross when he was 2 months old, and he’s now just over 3 months. He’s a feisty little guy, 6 lbs., who is all puppy teeth and hasn’t quite figured out potty training yet. I adopted him from our local Animal Control shelter because those animals have a harder time than our SPCA rescues being adopted, plus the price is reasonable, and their care good.
How a Chihuahua behaves depends on the genetic temperament of their parents and grandparents.[22] Their small size makes them delicate and vulnerable to injuries and attacks from larger animals. Like all dogs, they benefit from appropriate socialization and training.[23] Chihuahuas tend to learn better when being rewarded with a treat or positive reinforcement. With the proper training a Chihuahua needs this dog can be extremely intelligent. The way you train your dog will influence their behavior.[24]
In the United States they appear to have been employed chiefly for hunting rabbits from the earliest imports. Hunting hare with beagles became popular again in Britain in the mid-19th century and continued until it was made illegal in Scotland by the Protection of Wild Mammals (Scotland) Act 2002 and in England and Wales by the Hunting Act 2004. Under this legislation beagles may still pursue rabbits with the landowner's permission. Drag hunting is popular where hunting is no longer permitted or for those owners who do not wish to participate in hunting a live animal, but still wish to exercise their dog's innate skills.
The Chihuahua is a tiny toy sized dog. The body is longer than it is tall. The head is well-rounded, apple in shape and the muzzle is short and pointed with a well-defined stop. Puppies have a soft spot on the top of the skull called a "molera," which usually closes by adulthood. The large, round eyes are set well apart and are dark, ruby, and may be lighter in white dogs. Eye color varies and are often dark, but the merle gene can produce a dog with blue eyes. The erect ears are large. Dewclaws may be removed. The tail is long, sickle-shaped and either curled over the back or to the side. The coat can be short, long and wavy or flat. All colors, both solid, marked or splashed are accepted. Colors include, but are not limited to, black, white, chestnut, fawn, sand, silver, sable, steel blue, black & tan and parti-color.
What a blessed event that you found each other. I have 2 rescues from the local dog shelter, one rat-cha and one cheewinnie , 4 and 3 yeats old. I have a high stress job. When i get home their love helps me forget about all negative nuances of the day. PLEASE spread the word about rescuing animals. They are helpless without us. Take care of your baby girl, thank you for rescuing her.
The merle coat pattern, which appears mottled, is not traditionally considered part of the breed standard. In May 2007, The Kennel Club decided not to register puppies with this coloration due to the health risks associated with the responsible gene, and in December of that year, formally amended its breed standard to disqualify merle dogs.[20] The Fédération Cynologique Internationale, which represents the major kennel clubs of 84 countries, also disqualified merle.[16] Other countries' kennel clubs, including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Germany, have also disqualified merle. However, in May 2008, the Chihuahua Club of America voted that merles would not be disqualified in the United States, and would be fully registrable and able to compete in AKC events. Opponents of merle recognition suspect the coloration came about by modern crossbreeding with other dogs and not by natural genetic drift.[21][citation needed]
The first mention of the Beagle in America was in 1642. Beagles were used in the South prior to the Civil War, but these dogs bore little resemblance to their English counterparts. After the war, English imports formed the basis of the modern American Beagle. By the end of the nineteenth century, Beagles were popular competitors in both field and conformation exhibitions. But the merry little scenthound did not stop there: the Beagle continued to become one of America’s all-time favorite breeds, finding a special niche as family pet.
The beagle has an even temper and gentle disposition. Described in several breed standards as "merry", they are amiable and typically neither aggressive nor timid, although this depends on the individual. They enjoy company, and although they may initially be standoffish with strangers, they are easily won over. They make poor guard dogs for this reason, although their tendency to bark or howl when confronted with the unfamiliar makes them good watch dogs. In a 1985 study conducted by Ben and Lynette Hart, the beagle was given the highest excitability rating, along with the Yorkshire Terrier, Cairn Terrier, Miniature Schnauzer, West Highland White Terrier, and Fox Terrier.[41][c]
My husband and I own a male wired haired terrier, we were told he is chiweenie, pom mix. he looks very much like a wired fox terrier. We are living with a couple that own a female chihuahua and now we are proud grand parents of 3 little puppies born on the 19th of January. 2 male, 1 female. I think I will be keeping the female. Junior (the dad – our dog), is a delightful little guy – definitely a mans dog – goes everywhere with my husband. I’m hoping for this little girl to be my loving little companion. Excited but not looking forward to the training period. It’s a short term effort with long term rewards if done in the correct manner. Praying for patience and strength! I can’t come up with her name yet – calling her Baby Girl – but….. any suggestions?

The smallest breed of dog, the Chihuahua has a controversial history. One theory holds that it originated in China and was brought to the New World by Spanish traders, where it was then crossed with small native dogs. The other theory contends that it originated entirely in Central and South America, descending from the native Techichi. A small red dog was believed to guide the soul to the underworld, and every Aztec family kept such a dog that was buried with any deceased family member. To make matters worse for the Techichi, the Toltecs and their conquerors, the Aztecs, often ate dogs and the Techichi may have sometimes been on the menu. Despite what may have been short lives, the Techichis apparently were well cared for during life by the priests or their families. In fact, the most likely origin of the Chihuahua is a combination of these theories: the native Techichi was probably crossed with tiny hairless Chinese dogs, but again the date when this occurred is controversial.
Just like Apple Head and Deer Head Chihuahuas, Teacup Chihuahuas are from the same breed but have a different appearance. A Teacup Chihuahua on average doesn’t weigh more than four pounds. In a household they may need a little more looking after due to their small size. Teacup Chihuahuas can have either short or long hair. Although a Teacup is much smaller in size, they still have the same confident and energetic personality as a full sized Chihuahua. It is also very risky for Teacup Chihuahuas to have puppies due to their size. It can cause many complications and put their life at risk. [34] Compared to the typical lifespan of a Chihuahua a Teacup's lifespan tends to be much shorter due to the health issues they are more prone to have because of their small size.[35]
In several entries you will see that the dog was originally bred for fighting. In noting this, we are simply highlighting the motive for its creation. In no case does this determine the behavior of an individual Pit Bull and under no circumstances does it mean every dog is intended solely for this purpose. All dogs deserve a home with caring and responsible owners willing to meet all their needs. Obviously, clandestine dog fighting is an intolerable practice.
The terrier mix dogs that we see and know today have a long breeding history. During the early 18th century, the terriers were crossed with hunting (explains their great sense of smell) or fighting (explains their guarding nature) dogs. This was done to improve their ability to hunt (either on land or in waters) or fight. By the 19th century, dog shows began to be organized, which resulted in careful and purposeful breeding. Since then, breeders started to breed dogs mainly as pets.
The Chihuahua’s coat can be long with soft and straight hair, smooth with glossy and soft hair, or wavy with fringed ears. Its graceful body is compact and small, although slightly long in proportion to its height. The Chihuahua also bears a resemblance to the terrier in its alertness, attitude and lively expression. As far as its appearance, the breed can be found in solid black, solid white, with spots, or in a variety of patterns and colors.
He is a sweet dog inside our home and with friends and family, although territorial when in the patio. A few months ago my brother took him to the vet because he was limping. Everything was fine until he spotted another pitbull in the room. An embarrassed moment there, my brother who is a body builder, had to control and carry him out and we had to call another vet to prepare a separate room for him. No problem at the other vet's place, however no pitbulls there.
Small, compact, and hardy, Beagles are active companions for kids and adults alike. Canines in this dog breed are merry and fun loving, but being hounds, they can also be stubborn and require patient, creative training techniques. Their noses guide them through life, and they’re never happier than when following an interesting scent. The Beagle originally was bred as a scenthound to track small game, mostly rabbits and hare. He is still used for this purpose in many countries, including the United States.
All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit a particular disease. Run, don’t walk, from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee on puppies, who tells you that the breed is 100 percent healthy and has no known problems, or who tells you that her puppies are isolated from the main part of the household for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur in her lines. Here’s a brief rundown on what you should know.
Beagles are generally healthy, but certain health problems can affect them if breeders aren’t careful about performing health checks. They include hip dysplasia, a genetic malformation of the hip socket and certain types of heart conditions. Despite good breeding, Beagles may experience tears of the anterior cruciate ligament, which can require surgical repair, and intervertebral disc disease, a spinal problem that can make movement painful and may require surgical repair.
The terrier mix dogs that we see and know today have a long breeding history. During the early 18th century, the terriers were crossed with hunting (explains their great sense of smell) or fighting (explains their guarding nature) dogs. This was done to improve their ability to hunt (either on land or in waters) or fight. By the 19th century, dog shows began to be organized, which resulted in careful and purposeful breeding. Since then, breeders started to breed dogs mainly as pets.
Despite the many endearing qualities of the Chihuahua, if you’re thinking his tiny size makes him a great choice for children, you’d better think again. The Chihuahua may be just right for traveling around in a puppy purse, but he’s far too small and fragile for even the gentlest of children's games. Chihuahuas also tend to be high-strung and prone to nipping, snapping and even biting when frightened or threatened, or when defending his people or territory.

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, "owners of pit bull-type dogs deal with a strong breed stigma; however, controlled studies have not identified this breed group as disproportionately dangerous."[1] Because owners of stigmatized breeds are more likely to have involvement in criminal or violent acts, breed correlations may have the owner's behavior as the underlying causal factor.[1] Some jurisdictions have enacted legislation banning the group of breeds, and some insurance companies do not cover liability from pit bull bites. Among other roles, pit bulls have served as police dogs, search and rescue dogs, and several have appeared on film.
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