The bull breeds are often grossly misunderstood. The qualities that make these dogs tenacious players in obedience and agility games also attract highly unscrupulous people looking for strong competitors for their dog fighting rings. The sorry result is that bull breeds, in particular the APBT, have gained a reputation over recent years for being dangerous.

By 1887 the threat of extinction was on the wane: there were 18 beagle packs in England.[14] The Beagle Club was formed in 1890 and the first standard drawn up at the same time.[15] The following year the Association of Masters of Harriers and Beagles was formed. Both organisations aimed to further the best interests of the breed, and both were keen to produce a standard type of beagle.[16] By 1902, the number of packs had risen to 44.[14]
As humans became more sophisticated, so did their dogs. Eventually, there emerged specific breeds of dogs, custom-bred to suit the breeders’ local needs and circumstances. The Greyhound, for instance, was the foundation type for the immense Irish Wolfhound and the dainty Italian Greyhound. All three have a distinct family resemblance, but you’d never mistake one for another.
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From medieval times, beagle was used as a generic description for the smaller hounds, though these dogs differed considerably from the modern breed. Miniature breeds of beagle-type dogs were known from the times of Edward II and Henry VII, who both had packs of Glove Beagles, so named since they were small enough to fit on a glove, and Queen Elizabeth I kept a breed known as a Pocket Beagle, which stood 8 to 9 inches (20 to 23 cm) at the shoulder. Small enough to fit in a "pocket" or saddlebag, they rode along on the hunt. The larger hounds would run the prey to ground, then the hunters would release the small dogs to continue the chase through underbrush. Elizabeth I referred to the dogs as her singing beagles and often entertained guests at her royal table by letting her Pocket Beagles cavort amid their plates and cups.[6] 19th-century sources refer to these breeds interchangeably and it is possible that the two names refer to the same small variety. In George Jesse's Researches into the History of the British Dog from 1866, the early 17th-century poet and writer Gervase Markham is quoted referring to the beagle as small enough to sit on a man's hand and to the:
We also have a dog we found to be a mix , it turns out he is parsons Jack Russel / chihuahua mix and has turned out the biggest size he could have , we saw both parents and had pick if the litter so we now know we were duped and he was probably brought over with Irish travellers . As much as we love him , we are both pensioners and he is a lot more than we can handle and that’s why we chose a small breed , he was tiny when we had him at ten weeks and we have now discovered he must have been only five weeks old . Everyone should be aware if this when buying a puppy .
Wellness CORE Grain-Free Small Breed Turkey & Chicken Recipe Dry Dog Food: This protein-heavy, dry dog food lists turkey meal, deboned turkey, chicken meal, peas and potatoes as its main ingredients. It also has some carbohydrates but only in small amounts and derived from vegetables. Aside from the needed vitamins and minerals, it also has chondroitin and glucosamine to help improve your dog’s bones.
Reality: This is a stereotype that is biased toward generalizing and condemning an entire breed based on the actions of a few bad people. The truth is that each dog should be evaluated by his own merits and not by his breed. A corollary truth is that there truly are no bad dogs, only bad people. In his essay Troublemakers, Malcolm Gladwell discusses what Pit Bull stereotypes can teach us about the wrongness of racial profiling of both humans and dogs.
Be sure to follow the advice of the Chihuahua Club of America and seek out a responsible breeder who has done all required health testing for the breed. Those tests include Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) clearance on the parents' knees and heart, as well as Canine Eye Registration Foundation (CERF) vision testing. The CCA participates in the Canine Health Information Center (CHIC) database and requires all of those tests before an individual Chihuahua can be listed on the CHIC website. You can search the OFA and CHIC websites yourself to see if a pup’s parents are listed.

While there are different types of Pit Bulls, they do share some common characteristics. Pit Bull breeds are generally muscular dogs with a strong bite and, unfortunately, a bad reputation with some. Incorrect information about Pit Bull attacks or sensationalized stories contribute to this situation. However, much of this has to do with the terrible abuse individuals have suffered at the hands of many owners who have historically engaged them in the vile practice of dog fighting. This does not mean that Staffies, for example, are inherently dangerous dogs.
All terrier mix dogs do have some common characteristics, which they inherit from their terrier parent. Terriers are basically warriors and hunters, and they are extremely brave, energetic, and agile. But when they are with humans, these dogs display an interesting spectrum of temperaments and mood dispositions. Many of the macho terrier dog breeds such as, Jack Russel Terrier, Border Terrier, and Airedale Terrier, have taller and sturdy bodies.
Reality: This is a stereotype that is biased toward generalizing and condemning an entire breed based on the actions of a few bad people. The truth is that each dog should be evaluated by his own merits and not by his breed. A corollary truth is that there truly are no bad dogs, only bad people. In his essay Troublemakers, Malcolm Gladwell discusses what Pit Bull stereotypes can teach us about the wrongness of racial profiling of both humans and dogs.

Careful breeders screen their breeding dogs for genetic disease and breed only the healthiest and best-looking specimens, but sometimes Mother Nature has other ideas and a puppy develops one of these diseases despite good breeding practices. Advances in veterinary medicine mean that in most cases the dogs can still live a good life. If you’re getting a puppy, ask the breeder about the ages of the dogs in her lines and what they died of.
Their long floppy ears can mean that the inner ear does not receive a substantial air flow or that moist air becomes trapped, and this can lead to ear infections. Beagles may also be affected by a range of eye problems; two common ophthalmic conditions in beagles are glaucoma and corneal dystrophy.[55] "Cherry eye", a prolapse of the gland of the third eyelid, and distichiasis, a condition in which eyelashes grow into the eye causing irritation, sometimes exist; both these conditions can be corrected with surgery.[49] They can suffer from several types of retinal atrophy. Failure of the nasolacrimal drainage system can cause dry eye or leakage of tears onto the face.[49]

I just lost my little girl; she was a Wirehaired Terrier Chihuahua mix who was almost 18-years-old. I know that people tell me that was a good long run for a dog, but for me, it just wasn’t long enough. She had bonded to me, and since I retired two and a half years ago, we have been inseparable. Her name was Zoie, and she followed me everywhere. If she was asleep and I left the room, she would wake up and look for me. She was the smartest dog that I have had. I am heartbroken with the loss. Three nights ago, she died in my arms with me, begging for her to stay with me. I can’t replace her, but maybe I can fill the hole in my heart that was created when she was taken from me. After reading your article, I am concerned about getting a healthy dog.
What a blessed event that you found each other. I have 2 rescues from the local dog shelter, one rat-cha and one cheewinnie , 4 and 3 yeats old. I have a high stress job. When i get home their love helps me forget about all negative nuances of the day. PLEASE spread the word about rescuing animals. They are helpless without us. Take care of your baby girl, thank you for rescuing her.
So I am the owner of my first small dog. I have always had dobermans or Shepard’s growing up. To be honest – I hate to admit I viewed small dogs as “girl dogs” and as annoying. I know how that sounds – trust me. At a construction site job in the middle of Ocala right after I lost everything to my fiance I found cheating on me and had my entire savings of 22 grand stolen from m and all 14 of my credit accounts ran into the ground taking me from a 750 to 450 credit score – I found an abandoned dog with no chip – not spayed – nothing. I was sleeping in my truck at the time or in friends couches. I took he with the intent of finding her a home but oddly I was the only one she would come to or have anything to do with. I actually was immediately taken by her facial expressions to be honest. About a week later I found a place to rent temporarily . Then I used money to get her spade and her shots and vaccinations an microchipped using my parents address in Las Vegas as well as their phone number. I never planned on keeping her so I called her Baby Girl – turns out she was only 6 months old. Now we live in Vegas – long story short and she is a little over a year old now an honestly I ant imagine a day without her. We had to sleep in my 68 Chevy pick up at times, and I had to spend my food money to make sure she ate and on more motels than I could afford to keep her out of the blazing heat – but we made it work – and now we are in an apartment in Vegas Andi am finally going back to school for sports medicine. To be honest this little family member saved my life as I was on the brink of suicide a couple of times. And the name Baby girl just stuck. I’ve had to learn alot about how to care for something so small as her weight is all of 11 pounds – most times my fears revolve around injuring her an have taken quite a few falls on my arse after almost stepping on her or her foot as to not put full weight on her, but I’m learning fast. So yeah – it a great breed and we are quite the odd couple. So If anyone ever spots a 6 foot covered in tattoos white guy carrying a tiny wire haired terrier chihuahau mix (with a little mohawk on her head thank you very much) say hi – cause that’s us – lol. Don’t know how it happened but it did – not to mention……. Now I’m trying to find another of the same mix to be her companion when I start full time classes so she won’t be lonely being at home alone while I am in school!!! WTF! Yup – I’m that guy now. And it’s worth every minute –
The Beagle is a social dog that is particularly well suited to the company of humans and other dogs alike. It also needs to spend equal time in the yard as it does in the house. Regular exercise, such as a romp at the park or in a spacious yard area, along with regular leash-led walks are great outdoor activities for the Beagle. This breed can withstand temperate climates and live outdoors most seasons, as long as it has bedding and an enclosed, warm shelter. With its short, close coat, the Beagle does not require extensive grooming. An occasional brushing to encourage turnover of hair, and to minimize hair buildup in the house is all that is needed to keep your Beagle looking healthy and vibrant.
Whether you’re planning to get your new best friend from a breeder, a pet store, or another source, don’t forget that old adage “let the buyer beware”. Disreputable breeders and facilities that deal with puppy mills can be hard to distinguish from reliable operations. There’s no 100% guaranteed way to make sure you’ll never purchase a sick puppy, but researching the breed (so you know what to expect), checking out the facility (to identify unhealthy conditions or sick animals), and asking the right questions can reduce the chances of heading into a disastrous situation. And don’t forget to ask your veterinarian, who can often refer you to a reputable breeder, breed rescue organization, or other reliable source for healthy puppies.  
Neck rising free and light from the shoulders strong in substance yet not loaded, of medium length. The throat clean and free from folds of skin; a slight wrinkle below the angle of the jaw, however, may be allowable. Defects-A thick, short, cloddy neck carried on a line with the top of the shoulders. Throat showing dewlap and folds of skin to a degree termed “throatiness.”
My husband and I own a male wired haired terrier, we were told he is chiweenie, pom mix. he looks very much like a wired fox terrier. We are living with a couple that own a female chihuahua and now we are proud grand parents of 3 little puppies born on the 19th of January. 2 male, 1 female. I think I will be keeping the female. Junior (the dad – our dog), is a delightful little guy – definitely a mans dog – goes everywhere with my husband. I’m hoping for this little girl to be my loving little companion. Excited but not looking forward to the training period. It’s a short term effort with long term rewards if done in the correct manner. Praying for patience and strength! I can’t come up with her name yet – calling her Baby Girl – but….. any suggestions?
It is important to note that some of these dogs are rare pit bull breeds. Some are region specific, such as the Pynat and Stuffawler Pit Bulls. These dogs may not even exist in many areas due to a lack of breeding or the relative infancy of the breed. Others may have different names in different territories. For example, the Chamuco is commonly known as the Mexican Pit Bull outside of Mexico. Some, such as the Razors Edge Pit Bull, have been excluded due to lack of suitable breed traits.

The Chihuahua is a good companion dog. Courageous, extremely lively, proud and adventurous, they enjoy affection. Brave, cheerful and agile, Chihuahuas can be strong-willed without proper human leadership. They are loyal and become attached to their owners. Some like to lick their owner's faces. Socialize them well. For some, they may be slightly difficult to train, but they are intelligent, learn quickly, and respond well to proper, firm but gentle (positive reinforcement) training. May be difficult to housebreak. Do not let the Chihuahua get away with things you would not allow a large dog to do (Small Dog Syndrome), such as jumping up on humans. While it may be cute for a 5-pound tiny dog to put his paws on your leg when you come home from work, it is allowing a dominant behavior. If you allow this little dog to be your pack leader it will develop many behavior issues such as jealousy, aggression with other dogs and sometimes with humans, and will become undeniably suspicious of people except for its owner. When strangers are present, it will begin to follow its owner's every move, keeping as close as possible. A Chihuahua that is pack leader of its humans may snap at children. This breed is generally not recommended for children, not because it is not good with them, but because most people treat the Chihuahua differently than they would a large dog, causing it to become untrustworthy. Because of its size, this breed tends to be babied and things we humans clearly see as bad behavior for a large dog are looked over as cute with a small dog. Small dogs also tend to be walked less, as humans assume they get enough exercise just running around during the day. However, a walk provides more than just exercise. It provides mental stimulation and satisfies the migration instinct all dogs have. Because of this, small breeds such as the Chihuahua tend to become snappish, yappy, protective and untrustworthy with kids and humans they do not know. Chihuahuas that are their human's pack leader tend to be fairly dog-aggressive. An owner who realizes this and treats the Chihuahua no differently than they would a large breed, becoming a clear pack leader, will get a different, more appealing temperament out of this wonderful little dog, finding it to be a good little child companion.
One of the most amiable hounds, the Beagle was originally bred to be part of a pack and needs companionship, whether human or canine. This dog loves to explore the outdoors and is an enthusiastic trailer. Given adequate exercise, the Beagle is a calm, tractable house pet. Beagles tend to be excellent with children, gentle, incredibly tolerant, and always ready to join in a game or adventure. This is an independent breed, however, and may run off if a trail beckons. Beagles bark and howl.
The Beagle originated in England. His heritage stretches back to the packs of hunting hounds kept by landed gentry to hunt deer and hare. Beagle-like scenthounds were known as far back as 1475, when the word “Beagle” was first used to describe this type of hunting dog. It’s a matter of debate whether the name comes from a Celtic word meaning “small” or a French word meaning “open mouth” or “loud mouth.” Given the Beagle’s propensity for baying when he catches an interesting scent on the wind, the latter theory seems most likely.
In the case of the Chihuahua, blue merle Dachshunds were probably crossed in. Which essentially means that merle Chihuahuas aren't truly purebred. But since genetic diversity is a good thing in living creatures, I don't view cross-breeding as an evil thing. If there are a few Dachshund genes floating around in a merle Chihuahua, that wouldn't bother me.
Unfortunately, a lot of misinformation is posted online by anti-Pit Bull acolytes. Many provide information which ostensibly looks credible, but crumbles under scrutiny with only a little digging. One of the major pieces of ‘research’ is the so-called Clifton Report which is written by an author who defrauded readers in terms of his credentials and continually refuses to publish the raw data behind his claims[3].
Violent interactions between humans and canines have been studied by the U.S. government,[30] notably the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),[31] as well as academic veterinary researchers.[1] The interpretation of these studies, breed identification and relevance[32] issues, and variable circumstances have given rise to intense controversy.[33][34][35]
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