Reality: This is a stereotype that is biased toward generalizing and condemning an entire breed based on the actions of a few bad people. The truth is that each dog should be evaluated by his own merits and not by his breed. A corollary truth is that there truly are no bad dogs, only bad people. In his essay Troublemakers, Malcolm Gladwell discusses what Pit Bull stereotypes can teach us about the wrongness of racial profiling of both humans and dogs.
Chihuahuas frequently have what's called a "molera," or an open fontanelle, which is a soft area under the skin of the forehead where the bony plates of the skull have not fused together. It may eventually close up and become hard, but in some dogs, the molera never fully closes. While many dogs can live a normal lifespan with a molera, some may have a condition called hydrocephalus (fluid buildup in and around the brain), which can cause seizures and even death if not treated. A Chihuahua with a molera can live a perfectly normal life, but he is more prone to head injuries so he’s not the best candidate for a home with rambunctious children or bigger, rougher dogs.

Leaping from your arms. Some Chihuahuas melt into your arms and stay there, but many are wriggly. They can be deceptive about it, too, apparently settling into your arms with contentment, then suddenly launching themselves through the air if you relax your grip. A fall from a few feet up, especially over a hard surface, can result in a broken leg or concussion. Hold on tight if you pick up a Chihuahua over concrete.
There are subcategories as working dogs, companion dogs, herding dogs, guard dogs, hunting dogs and sled dogs. Working dogs are for example lapdogs, who are used as therapy dogs. Companion dogs are just providing companionship and are known as pets and who are usually not used for specific tasks. Herding dogs are known as stock dog and they are working with livestock. They are also called pastoral dogs, who do not necessarily have to be trained in herding. Guard dogs defend the property of people. They are also named watch dogs or attack dogs. They bark aloud, when there is a presence of a possible intruder and alert in this way their owners. Hunting dog hunts with or for their owners. There are a lot of different types of dogs, who have the special hunting skills. Sled dogs are also named sledge dogs or sleigh dogs, who were bred historically for pulling sleds to transport or haul supplies into areas which are inaccessible by another method.
Finding a good breeder is the key to finding the right puppy. A good breeder will match you with the right puppy, and will without question have done all the health certifications necessary to screen out health problems as much as possible. He or she is more interested in placing pups in the right homes than making big bucks. Good breeders will welcome your questions about temperament, health clearances and what the dogs are like to live with and come right back at you with questions of their own about what you’re looking for in a dog and what kind of life you can provide for him. Most breeders like to keep the pups until they are 12 to 14 weeks old to ensure that they are mature enough to go to their new homes.
Beagles imports began arriving in America in the years after the Civil War, and their popularity among U.S. rabbit hunters was immediate. The AKC registered its first Beagle, named Blunder, in 1885. To this day, “beaglers” in woodsy areas of North America still swear by their breed’s great nose, musical voice, and enthusiastic approach to rabbit hunting.
The majority of Chihuahuas are healthy little dogs, but there are some genetic issues that can affect the breed. You should choose your dog from a breeder who routinely does genetic health screenings on all breeding stock to ensure that the puppies they produce are as genetically sound as possible. Some of the issues that can possibly affect the Chihuahua include potential heart problems (patent ductus arteriosus, mitral valve disease), eye disease, and patellar luxation (loose kneecaps). Idiopathic epilepsy is also known to occur in the breed.
In a 2000 review by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which examines data from both media reports and from the Humane Society of the United States, pit bull-type dogs were identified in approximately one-third of dog bite-related fatalities in the United States between 1981 and 1992. However, the review notes that studies on dog bite-related fatalities which collect information by surveying news reports are subject to potential errors, as some fatal attacks may not have been reported, a study might not find all relevant news reports, and the dog breed might be misidentified.[42] The AVMA has also noted fundamental problems with tracking breed in dog bite-related fatalities.[38] In a 2013 study of 256 fatalities in the United States from 2000 to 2009, the AVMA determined that valid breed determination was possible for only 17.6% of cases.[43]

Now, the actual amount of shedding depends on whether the coat is single or double. NOT on whether the coat is short or long, but whether it is double (outer coat plus undercoat) or single (just an outercoat). Remember we talked about single and double coats earlier. Whether a coat is short or long, the double coats shed more than the single coats. Which makes sense.


Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA): This is a degenerative eye disorder that eventually causes blindness from the loss of photoreceptors at the back of the eye. PRA is detectable years before the dog shows any signs of blindness. Fortunately, dogs can use their other senses to compensate for blindness, and a blind dog can live a full and happy life. Just don't make it a habit to move the furniture around. Reputable breeders have their dogs' eyes certified annually by a veterinary ophthalmologist and do not breed dogs with this disease.
The Chihuahua burst onto the national stage as a “must have” dog for two reasons: The “Yo Quiero Taco Bell?” ad campaign and, more recently, the tendency of rich, attractive and famous young women to haul these small dogs with big attitudes around in stylish and expensive oversized purses. The appeal? The tiny (as small as two pounds) Chihuahua offers feistiness coupled with enduring loyalty to the person he chooses as his own, along with an expressive face, including large, round eyes that show everything the dog is thinking.
In March I adopted what was thought to be a “Chihuahua/Cairn Terrier” cross when he was 2 months old, and he’s now just over 3 months. He’s a feisty little guy, 6 lbs., who is all puppy teeth and hasn’t quite figured out potty training yet. I adopted him from our local Animal Control shelter because those animals have a harder time than our SPCA rescues being adopted, plus the price is reasonable, and their care good.

In Beagles, you should expect to see health clearances from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) for hip dysplasia (with a score of fair or better), elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand's disease; from Auburn University for thrombopathia; and from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF) certifying that eyes are normal. You can confirm health clearances by checking the OFA web site (offa.org).
And, as far as dogs are concerned, I would love love to have a Bully friend :-) Currently I am mostly thinking between American Staffordshire Terrier, American Pit Bull or American Bulldog. American Bulldogs I know pretty well, Staffordshire some and with the Am. Pit Bulls I haven't had longer experiences. So, please, if you have some article or words of advice which could draw some more detailed comparison, please share. I have of course googled it all, but it all comes down to similar as I thought – they are similar in temperament, only American Bulldogs are better guards and generally a bit calmer/slower (more mastif, less terrier). All of them very gentle, loving, athletic. Is there something more or different you would say?
A disease that seems to be increasing among Chihuahuas is GME, which stands for Granulomatous Meningoencephalitis. It is becoming more frequent among the apple head Chis. It is, at this time, a very poorly understood central nervous system disease that suddenly strikes without much warning. It comes in three types: focal (lesions in the brain or spine); multifocal (lesions in both brain and spine as well as eyes); and optical (causing blindness. There are several current methods of treating it currently and which continue to be updated as more research is done. While there are methods of controlling it in those dogs who survive the first two weeks, unfortunately, there is no true cure. It can go into remission, sometimes for years, but can always resurface. The medications, testing, etc. in the beginning in order to properly diagnose, the cost is in the thousands and many, many more thousands will need to be spent over the remaining years of the dog's life. While GME occurs in many other breeds (generally the toy breeds though there are some others, there is a tremendous number of Chihuahuas with it. Interestingly, deer head Chihuahua's do not tend to be prone to GME, only the apple-head type.
Sites like Petfinder.com and Adopt-a-Pet.com can have you searching for a Beagle in your area in no time flat. The site allows you to be very specific in your requests (housetraining status, for example) or very general (all the Beagles available on Petfinder across the country). AnimalShelter can help you find animal rescue groups in your area. Also some local newspapers have “pets looking for homes” sections you can review.
The Beagle has a smooth, dense double coat that gets heavier in the winter, so spring is shedding season. Beagles also shed moderately year-round. Weekly brushing with a medium-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a hound glove will remove the loose hair, and promotes new hair growth as well. Beagles don’t need to be bathed too often, unless they happen to get into something particularly messy. As with all breeds, the Beagle’s nails should be trimmed regularly, because overly long nails can cause the dog pain as well as problems walking and running.
One of the most amiable hounds, the Beagle was originally bred to be part of a pack and needs companionship, whether human or canine. This dog loves to explore the outdoors and is an enthusiastic trailer. Given adequate exercise, the Beagle is a calm, tractable house pet. Beagles tend to be excellent with children, gentle, incredibly tolerant, and always ready to join in a game or adventure. This is an independent breed, however, and may run off if a trail beckons. Beagles bark and howl.
The history of the Chihuahua is quite controversial. According to one theory, it was originally developed in China and then brought to the Americas by Spanish traders, where it was interbred with small native dogs. Others speculate it is of South and Central American origin, descended from a small, mute dog -- the native Techichi -- which was occasionally sacrificed in Toltec religious rites. It was believed that this diminutive red dog guided the soul to the underworld after death. Thus, all Aztec families kept this dog and buried it with the deceased member of the family. (Curiously, the Toltecs and the Aztecs also fed on the Techichi.) When not used in burial rituals, however, the Aztec and Toltec priests and families took great care of the Techichis.
Anti-vivisection groups have reported on abuse of animals inside testing facilities. In 1997 footage secretly filmed by a freelance journalist inside Huntingdon Life Sciences in the UK showed staff punching and screaming at beagles.[79] Consort Kennels, a UK-based breeder of beagles for testing, closed down in 1997 after pressure from animal rights groups.[80]
Intervertebral Disk Disease: The spinal cord is surrounded by the vertebral column, and between the bones of the vertebral column are intervertebral discs that work as shock absorbers and allow normal movement of the vertebrae. The discs are made of two layers, an outer fibrous layer and an inner jelly-like layer. Intervertebral disc disease occurs when the jelly like inner layer protrudes into the spinal canal and pushes against the spinal cord. Compression of the spinal cord may be minimal, causing neck or back pain, or it can be severe, causing loss of sensation, paralysis, and lack of bowel or bladder control. The damage done by the spinal compression may be irreversible. Treatment is based on several factors, including location, severity, and length of time between injury and treatment. Confining the dog may be of some use, but surgery is often needed to relieve pressure on the spinal cord. Surgery is not always successful.

The history of the Chihuahua is quite controversial. According to one theory, it was originally developed in China and then brought to the Americas by Spanish traders, where it was interbred with small native dogs. Others speculate it is of South and Central American origin, descended from a small, mute dog -- the native Techichi -- which was occasionally sacrificed in Toltec religious rites. It was believed that this diminutive red dog guided the soul to the underworld after death. Thus, all Aztec families kept this dog and buried it with the deceased member of the family. (Curiously, the Toltecs and the Aztecs also fed on the Techichi.) When not used in burial rituals, however, the Aztec and Toltec priests and families took great care of the Techichis.
Beagles bond with everyone in the family, especially children. They can be rambunctious when playing, however, so they need to be properly socialized and supervised with very young children. In addition, Beagles tend to be "mouthy," grabbing things, including your or your child's hand, with their mouths to play. They do this in fun and can be trained not to do this.

Beagles are used as sniffer dogs for termite detection in Australia,[81] and have been mentioned as possible candidates for drug and explosive detection.[82][83] Because of their gentle nature and unimposing build, they are also frequently used in pet therapy, visiting the sick and elderly in hospital.[84] In June 2006, a trained Beagle assistance dog was credited with saving the life of its owner after using her owner's mobile phone to dial an emergency number.[85] In the aftermath of the 2010 Haiti earthquake, a Beagle search and rescue dog with a Colombian rescue squad was credited with locating the owner of the Hôtel Montana, who was subsequently rescued after spending 100 hours buried in the rubble.[86] Beagles were hired by New York City to help with bedbug detection,[87] while the role of such dogs in this type of detection may have doubts.[88]
Leaping from your arms. Some Chihuahuas melt into your arms and stay there, but many are wriggly. They can be deceptive about it, too, apparently settling into your arms with contentment, then suddenly launching themselves through the air if you relax your grip. A fall from a few feet up, especially over a hard surface, can result in a broken leg or concussion. Hold on tight if you pick up a Chihuahua over concrete.
Small, compact, and hardy, Beagles are active companions for kids and adults alike. Canines in this dog breed are merry and fun loving, but being hounds, they can also be stubborn and require patient, creative training techniques. Their noses guide them through life, and they’re never happier than when following an interesting scent. The Beagle originally was bred as a scenthound to track small game, mostly rabbits and hare. He is still used for this purpose in many countries, including the United States.
How do Chihuahuas get along with dogs outside their own family? Often not well. Chihuahuas often raise a ruckus when they spy a strange dog, especially a larger dog. It's as though the Chihuahua wants to convince the larger dog that he is a force to reckon with rather than a helpless prey animal. The Chihuahua may be seeking to protect itself by putting up a blustering facade that tells the other dog to "move along."
How do Chihuahuas get along with dogs outside their own family? Often not well. Chihuahuas often raise a ruckus when they spy a strange dog, especially a larger dog. It's as though the Chihuahua wants to convince the larger dog that he is a force to reckon with rather than a helpless prey animal. The Chihuahua may be seeking to protect itself by putting up a blustering facade that tells the other dog to "move along."

The Chihuahua is a lively dog that nonetheless can get his exercise running from room to room indoors. He enjoys exploring the yard or going for a short walk on leash and especially enjoys accompanying his owner on outings. He hates the cold and seeks out warmth. Coat care for the smooth is minimal. Care of the long coat entails brushing two to three times a week.
Apple head Chihuahuas can have moleras, or a soft spot in their skulls, and they are the only breed of dog to be born with an incomplete skull. This is not a defect; it is a normal adaptation facilitating the passage through the birth canal and growth and development of the domed type of forehead. The molera is predominant in the apple heads and is present in nearly all Chihuahua puppies. The molera fills in with age, but great care needs to be taken during the first six months until the skull is fully formed. Some moleras do not close completely and require extra care to prevent injury.[38]

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