According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, "owners of pit bull-type dogs deal with a strong breed stigma; however, controlled studies have not identified this breed group as disproportionately dangerous."[1] Because owners of stigmatized breeds are more likely to have involvement in criminal or violent acts, breed correlations may have the owner's behavior as the underlying causal factor.[1] Some jurisdictions have enacted legislation banning the group of breeds, and some insurance companies do not cover liability from pit bull bites. Among other roles, pit bulls have served as police dogs, search and rescue dogs, and several have appeared on film.
Thank you for the amazing article, filled with great and interesting information! I love such a clear-minded and healthy approach, where one can simply see that people truly know what they're talking about. Too often, as in negative myths, people write "oh they're just wonderful". Which is true!, but, it is better to be educated and have strong facts behind the statement so one can have a trustful argument when speaking – and to really show the people what is TRUE, not a personal opinion – be it in a positive or negative context.
The Beagle originated in England. His heritage stretches back to the packs of hunting hounds kept by landed gentry to hunt deer and hare. Beagle-like scenthounds were known as far back as 1475, when the word “Beagle” was first used to describe this type of hunting dog. It’s a matter of debate whether the name comes from a Celtic word meaning “small” or a French word meaning “open mouth” or “loud mouth.” Given the Beagle’s propensity for baying when he catches an interesting scent on the wind, the latter theory seems most likely.
The merle coat pattern, which appears mottled, is not traditionally considered part of the breed standard. In May 2007, The Kennel Club decided not to register puppies with this coloration due to the health risks associated with the responsible gene, and in December of that year, formally amended its breed standard to disqualify merle dogs.[20] The Fédération Cynologique Internationale, which represents the major kennel clubs of 84 countries, also disqualified merle.[16] Other countries' kennel clubs, including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Germany, have also disqualified merle. However, in May 2008, the Chihuahua Club of America voted that merles would not be disqualified in the United States, and would be fully registrable and able to compete in AKC events. Opponents of merle recognition suspect the coloration came about by modern crossbreeding with other dogs and not by natural genetic drift.[21][citation needed]
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