The Chihuahua burst onto the national stage as a “must have” dog for two reasons: The “Yo Quiero Taco Bell?” ad campaign and, more recently, the tendency of rich, attractive and famous young women to haul these small dogs with big attitudes around in stylish and expensive oversized purses. The appeal? The tiny (as small as two pounds) Chihuahua offers feistiness coupled with enduring loyalty to the person he chooses as his own, along with an expressive face, including large, round eyes that show everything the dog is thinking.
Apple Head and Deer Head comes from the same breed of Chihuahuas but they are different due to their physical appearance. The Apple Head Chihuahua is known for having a round/ apple shaped head and “buggy eyes” whereas a Deer Head Chihuahua has a flatter head, thinner skull, wider eyes, and longer nose. Their physical body shape is mostly the same, except the Deer Head Chihuahua is known to have longer legs than other Chihuahuas.[29] The Deer Head Chihuahua tends to be larger in weight, where an Apple Head is more likely to keep their weight under ten pounds. Apple Head Chihuahuas are bigger in length than they are tall and have shorter necks.[30] Deer Head Chihuahuas have longer ears than Apple Heads and their head also has a slope like form. Both Apple Head and Deer Head can be a short hair or long hair. They also both come in various different colors such as brown, black, tan, or white. Chihuahuas can show traits from both Apple Head and Deer Head.[31] Deer Head Chihuahuas tend to have better health than Apple Heads, due to their longer noses. Apple Heads have a higher risk of getting respiratory issues, due to having a smaller airway. Deer Headed Chihuahuas are not allowed in The American Kennel Club (a club of purebred dogs registered in the United States) due to not meeting the standards that Apple Heads do. Deer Head Chihuahuas are not allowed because they have a longer jaw line and a slope that connects their muzzle and head, creating a 45 degree angle instead of a 90 degree angle like the Apple Head.[32] Apple Heads are allowed in AKC and meet the requirements due to having a smaller weight, having a rounder head, and also having a 90 degree angle formed by the muzzle to the forehead.[33]
Two-color varieties always have a white base color with areas of the second color. Tan and white is the most common two-color variety, but there is a wide range of other colors including lemon, a very light tan; red, a reddish, almost orange, brown; and liver, a darker brown, and black. Liver is not common and is not permitted in some standards; it tends to occur with yellow eyes. Ticked or mottled varieties may be either white or black with different colored flecks (ticking), such as the blue-mottled or bluetick beagle, which has spots that appear to be a midnight-blue color, similar to the coloring of the Bluetick Coonhound. Some tricolor beagles also have ticking of various colors in their white areas.[33][34]
In 1916, five members of the National Beagle Club purchased 508 acres in Western Loudoun County, Virginia for the purpose of holding field trials. The men who purchased it formed a corporation called Institute Corporate to purchase and own the land, then leasing it to the Institute Foundation that maintains the property for the National Beagle Club, which today is the site of many activities of the National Beagle Club.
Leaping from your arms. Some Chihuahuas melt into your arms and stay there, but many are wriggly. They can be deceptive about it, too, apparently settling into your arms with contentment, then suddenly launching themselves through the air if you relax your grip. A fall from a few feet up, especially over a hard surface, can result in a broken leg or concussion. Hold on tight if you pick up a Chihuahua over concrete.
Another myth about Pit Bull type dogs is that they have a locked jaw which is impossible to break. While many of these dogs do indeed have a strong bite, it is a myth that their jaw locks. It can be broken using a bite stick or by some of the other ways mentioned in our article on breaking a Pit Bull's bite. Another important factor in Pit Bulls is the tendency to dock their tails and ears which makes it more difficult to recognize the signs of aggression in these dogs.
When the Spanish first arrived in Chihuahua, more than 200 indigenous groups, including Native Americans, already inhabited the area. Although little of this period’s history is recorded, archeologists have found evidence of inhabitants dating as far back as 3,000 years. Some of these tribes include the Tarahumara (Raramuri), Apache, Comanche and Guarojío. For several thousand years, indigenous groups living in Chihuahua maintained trading relations with groups in other areas. Perhaps the most notable inhabitants were the Tarahumara (Raramuri), a people whose rich spiritual ideology, passive resistance and strong cultural identity enabled them to persevere despite foreign intrusions. Other tribes, like the warlike Apache, were overwhelmed and eventually assimilated after the arrival of the Spaniards.
It is important to note that some of these dogs are rare pit bull breeds. Some are region specific, such as the Pynat and Stuffawler Pit Bulls. These dogs may not even exist in many areas due to a lack of breeding or the relative infancy of the breed. Others may have different names in different territories. For example, the Chamuco is commonly known as the Mexican Pit Bull outside of Mexico. Some, such as the Razors Edge Pit Bull, have been excluded due to lack of suitable breed traits.
My rescue is Iggyboo, a cairn terrier/Chihuahua mix, weighing in at 10 lbs and only 8 inches tall, now at almost 3 yrs. He is very protective and loyal, and pretty much a lap dog. He loves to play with his toys, and is highly intelligent, often preferring his interactive toys over stuffed ones. I find myself constantly teaching him new words or playing new games. He hates children and often adults, but can warm up to people given a few minutes and a few kind words (treats help this process). He also can be a challenge to walk, being aggressive to other dogs, but responds very well to a clicker and a treat for distraction. So, generally I have had no issues with him on walks, but am always careful. He loves bedtime, and burrows under the covers, sleeping a full 8 hours straight, he gets upset if I roll over and wake him up and will growl at me, lol.

Because Chihuahuas get cold easily they tend to love their dens and will often burrow themselves in pillows, clothes hampers, and blankets. They are often found under the covers or at the bottom of the bed, deep in the dark and safety of what they perceive as their den. Chihuahuas also enjoy time in sunlight.[27] Chihuahuas sometimes act like cats and climb up to the highest point on a couch, usually on top of the pillows, and curl up into a ball. Chihuahuas have their own type of personality. They tend to be alert. Chihuahuas typically do not show fear; even though they are a smaller breed, they do not view their size as a disadvantage. [28]
Having a solid structure, the Beagle resembles a Foxhound. Hunters can follow the dog on foot, and the tuneful bay of the Beagle aids hunters in locating the dog from a distance. Because of its moderate size, the Beagle can even be carried to the hunting site, where it can then scurry into the dense undergrowth to look for the target. The dog receives protection against the thick underbrush from its coarse and close coat. And being an amicable dog makes it a great pack hunter, mixing well with other dogs.
A related bit of information is that Beagles love to eat. Love it! And they are creative about finding and accessing food. Experienced owners put food, trash cans and anything else that might appear or smell edible to a Beagle well out of reach. On the plus side, that love of food comes in handy for training Beagles. They’ll do just about anything for a treat.
Welcome to The Terrier Mix. If you love terrier mix dogs as much as we do, you have come to the right place. We have information on a wide variety of terrier breeds, in case you want to track down the ancestry of a particular pooch. If you are looking for tips on terrier mix care, try our care section. We also have quite the collection of terrier mix pictures as well.  Thanks for stopping by!
Although credited with the development of the modern breed, Honeywood concentrated on producing dogs for hunting and it was left to Thomas Johnson to refine the breeding to produce dogs that were both attractive and capable hunters. Two strains were developed: the rough- and smooth-coated varieties. The rough-coated beagle survived until the beginning of the 20th century, and there were even records of one making an appearance at a dog show as late as 1969, but this variety is now extinct, having probably been absorbed into the standard beagle bloodline.[11]
How do Chihuahuas get along with dogs outside their own family? Often not well. Chihuahuas often raise a ruckus when they spy a strange dog, especially a larger dog. It's as though the Chihuahua wants to convince the larger dog that he is a force to reckon with rather than a helpless prey animal. The Chihuahua may be seeking to protect itself by putting up a blustering facade that tells the other dog to "move along."
I have a chiuhuahua border terrier cross. He’s just about 16 months old. It’s just me and my husband and he loves us equally. He hates kids, always barks and growls at them. He surprisingly likes most other people, unless my husband isn’t around, he gets protective over me if men come around me. He likes all dogs, big and small. He jumps at them and is very playful. He’s also very snugly and sweet. I have noticed the tranchea problem with him though and also his eyes water all the time. He’s fixed and still only weighs about 5 lbs. he’s been hard to potty train- he wouldn’t go out into the snow until this year. I usually have to carry him on walks in cold and wet weather because he’s always shivering. he’s inquisitive, likes to wander.. we have to keep a close eye on him at the dog parks because he can wiggle his way under the fence to run after the dogs! Definitely the best dog I ever had, he’s got the most unique personality, he’s not ‘yappy’ for the most part.. just at night when I’m trying to sleep lol.
Beagles may be prone to epilepsy, but this can often be controlled with medication. Hypothyroidism and a number of types of dwarfism occur in beagles. Two conditions in particular are unique to the breed: "Funny Puppy", in which the puppy is slow to develop and eventually develops weak legs, a crooked back and although normally healthy, is prone to a range of illnesses;[49] and Musladin-Lueke Syndrome (MLS) in which the eyes are slanted and the outer toes are underdeveloped but otherwise development is as normal.[50] Hip dysplasia, common in Harriers and in some larger breeds, is rarely considered a problem in beagles.[51] Beagles are considered a chondrodystrophic breed, meaning that they are prone to types of disk diseases.[52]
Whether you’re planning to get your new best friend from a breeder, a pet store, or another source, don’t forget that old adage “let the buyer beware”. Disreputable breeders and facilities that deal with puppy mills can be hard to distinguish from reliable operations. There’s no 100% guaranteed way to make sure you’ll never purchase a sick puppy, but researching the breed (so you know what to expect), checking out the facility (to identify unhealthy conditions or sick animals), and asking the right questions can reduce the chances of heading into a disastrous situation. And don’t forget to ask your veterinarian, who can often refer you to a reputable breeder, breed rescue organization, or other reliable source for healthy puppies.  

Pit bulls were created by crossbreeding bulldogs and terriers to produce a dog that combined the strength of the bulldog with the gameness and agility of the terrier.[6] In the United Kingdom, these dogs were used in blood sports such as bull-baiting and bear-baiting. These blood sports were officially eliminated in 1835, as Britain began to introduce animal welfare laws. Since dogfights were cheaper to organize and far easier to conceal from the law than bull- or bear-baits, blood sport proponents turned to pitting their dogs against each other instead.[5] Dog fighting was used as both a blood sport (often involving gambling) and a way to continue to test the quality of their stock. For decades afterwards, dog fighting took place clandestinely in small areas of Britain and America. In the early 20th century, pit bulls were used as catch dogs in America for semi-wild cattle and hogs, to hunt and drive livestock, and as family companions.[6] Some have been selectively bred for their fighting prowess.[8][9]
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