my comment is for all pit owners as being 1 myself ppl say its all in how ya raise them and i do believe thats true to some extent althjo if ya will recall new articals to where pit bulls have attacked every age from toddlers to old folks and everytime its all the same answer or comment my dog has never offered to bite any one he has never been aggressive a dog has a personality just like humans altho it seems like when a pit bull goes off the deep end there is no bringing them back i no that a pit is not the breed of dog that ranks up to the top or near the top for bites when a pit goes to bite he is very aggressive and will not stop untill its prey is dead thats why it has took me so long to get this breed trust is an issue to make a long story short i told my grand kids if she ever bites with aggression i will have her taken away from here n we shall h=get another beagle ( just saying )
Avoid breeders who only seem interested in how quickly they can unload a puppy on you and whether your credit card will go through. And don’t believe a seller who tells you a "teacup” or “toy” Chihuahua is more valuable or desirable than a properly-sized dog of four to six pounds. Extreme miniaturization brings with it nothing but health problems and a shortened lifespan. Language like that is a huge red flag that you're dealing with a seller more interested in money than the good of the dogs or the broken hearts of the people who buy them.
The two coat varieties of the Chihuahua have slightly different grooming needs. The smooth-coat Chihuahua will need only occasional brushing and regular baths to look dapper, while the longhaired variety should have his coat brushed at least once a week to avoid any tangles or mats. Both varieties should have their nails trimmed regularly. Good dental care is necessary and should include brushing your dog’s teeth, and the vet might also recommend treats designed as part of a tooth-care program. Check the Chihuahua’s ears regularly, and remove any excess wax or debris to avoid ear infections.
What a blessed event that you found each other. I have 2 rescues from the local dog shelter, one rat-cha and one cheewinnie , 4 and 3 yeats old. I have a high stress job. When i get home their love helps me forget about all negative nuances of the day. PLEASE spread the word about rescuing animals. They are helpless without us. Take care of your baby girl, thank you for rescuing her.
Everything a Beagle does somehow leads back to his nose. His powerful sense of smell overcomes any good sense you might have tried to instill and tells the Beagle to escape from the yard or break into the dog food bag in the pantry or see what’s in the trash. When channeled properly, it’s also what makes him a great arson dog or termite detector, so it all evens out in the end. Just remember that when your Beagle’s nose is down, his “other brain” is turned off.
In the Mexican War of Independence, Chihuahua hacienda owners and miners sided with the royalist forces against the independence movement. However, Mexico’s independence in 1821 forced leaders in Chihuahua to join the new country. The 1821 Plan of Iguala established the framework that consolidated the new republic; later, the region of Durango separated from Chihuahua and became an autonomous province. Chihuahua officially became a Mexican state in 1824; the state constitution was ratified the following year.

"Monkey is a 10-week-old Chihuahua. She got her name Monkey because she climbs on my shoulders all the time and adores bananas, so I thought 'Monkey' really fit her. She is very, very playful and is a joy to have. She is completely pad trained now and knows sit! She lives with 2 adults, 2 teenagers (15 and 16) and 2 little kids (7 and 11) and she loves everyone. But, is very attached to me (I'm 16). Monkey is estimated to weigh about 3 lbs. full grown. She is extremely smart and has great manners, surprisingly. Monkey is for sure a lapdog and follows me around everywhere!! Loves car rides and is very well socialized. I've watched Cesar Millan for about 3 years now and have read his book. He's amazing and has taught me so much about dog psychology, he is truly my idol. Monkey is a well-balanced dog and I taught her young not to have the mind set to walk all over me or try to control me in any way. Though she is spoiled rotten, she knows who is boss. I could not imagine my life without my little Monkey and have lots of years to look forward to. I will ONLY have Chihuahuas; they are an amazing breed and truly a joy to have!!"
Dog effigy pots dating to around 1325 AD discovered in Georgia and Tennessee also appear to represent the Chihuahua.[6] In 1850, a pot featuring the Chihuahua-like dogs was unearthed in old ruins at Casas Grandes in the Mexican state of Chihuahua, which dates from 1100–1300 AD showing the long history of such dogs at this site,[5] although most artifacts relating to its existence are found around Mexico City. It has been argued that these pots arrived with survivors from the Casas Grandes site in Chihuahua, Mexico, after it was attacked and destroyed around 1340 AD.

In a 2014 literature review of dog bite studies, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) states that breed is a poor sole predictor of dog bites.[36] Controlled studies have not identified pit bulls as disproportionately dangerous. Pit bull-type dogs are more frequently identified with cases involving very severe injuries or fatalities than other breeds, but the review suggests this may relate to the popularity of the breed, noting that sled dogs, such as Siberian Huskies, were involved in a majority of fatal dog attacks in some areas of Canada.[1] Bite statistics by breed are not tracked by the CDC[37], AVMA[38] or the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA).[39] State Farm Insurance spokeswoman Heather Paul stated "Pit bulls in particular are often misidentified when a bite incident occurs, so reliable bite statistics related to the dogs’ breed are unreliable and serve no purpose."[40] The White House stated that "the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looked at twenty years of data about dog bites and human fatalities in the United States. They found that fatal attacks represent a very small proportion of dog bite injuries to people and that it’s virtually impossible to calculate bite rates for specific breeds". [41]

Start training early, be patient and be consistent, and one day you will wake up to find that you live with a great dog. But even so, there are a few Beagle behaviors that you should expect to live with throughout his life. They are part and parcel of being a Beagle, and nothing you do will change them. Beagles love good smells, Beagles howl, Beagles have selective hearing, and Beagles love to eat.
Your Beagle’s personality will also be affected by the kind of breeder who produced him. Beagles from breeders who produce hunting dogs are more likely to be hard-charging and demanding of exercise. They are unsuited to lying around the house all day while everyone is at work or school. More laid back Beagles typically come from a breeder who shows dogs in conformation.

"These are our Chi babies, from left: Maxwell (6 months), Milo (9 months) and Matilda (also 9 months). While Milo and Matilda are on the bigger side of the Chi scale at 7 and 9 lbs., Maxwell is on the more average size at about 4½ lbs. Milo is a bit more on the lazy side compared to the other two and sometimes will just sit and watch the others play. He is also a bit insecure which we are working on with him. They are all very loving however and are always anxious to share kisses with their humans and with each other alike. Sometimes they'll lie in the sun bathing each other’s faces and making sure they are all looking their best. Then they will burrow in blankets, pillows, etc. until they fluff it up just enough to get comfortable and then proceed to take a long nap. While none of them are the "alpha" (that's the humans job, isn't it?!) our female, Matilda is by far the most bossy out of the group. If she wants to play, you'd better play or else you'll get a "donkey kick" until she gets a reaction. Typical female! (and yes, I can say that because I AM a female! :o)
It is really common. They are Chi’s at heart sometimes and they are bred as lap/companion dogs so they are naturally very protective of their owners. Especially to Larger dogs and humans. What I have found with my baby girl is that she has what I call “big dog syndrome.’ As in she thinks she is much bigger than she is. She’ll get up in another dogs face in a heartbeat if it meant telling them to stay away from me. Once I pet that dog and talk to her when I do it she calms down and after 5-10 minutes she is best friends with them. Humans too. lol. It is just their way of being there for you too. Even if it is unwanted. Best thing is to roll with it and show them its alright and eventually they learn. they are so smart.
"I have been watching Cesar Millan's shows for a couple months now and have started to use a lot of his techniques. While my puppies are still young and are a work in progress as most are, I think using these techniques will help them become balanced adults. Of course, the more I watch, the more I learn so I am also a "pack leader work in progress." My pups are already great minding as a result and as an example of that as you can see they are easily "pose-able" for photographs. :o)"
My rescue is Iggyboo, a cairn terrier/Chihuahua mix, weighing in at 10 lbs and only 8 inches tall, now at almost 3 yrs. He is very protective and loyal, and pretty much a lap dog. He loves to play with his toys, and is highly intelligent, often preferring his interactive toys over stuffed ones. I find myself constantly teaching him new words or playing new games. He hates children and often adults, but can warm up to people given a few minutes and a few kind words (treats help this process). He also can be a challenge to walk, being aggressive to other dogs, but responds very well to a clicker and a treat for distraction. So, generally I have had no issues with him on walks, but am always careful. He loves bedtime, and burrows under the covers, sleeping a full 8 hours straight, he gets upset if I roll over and wake him up and will growl at me, lol.
My rescue is Iggyboo, a cairn terrier/Chihuahua mix, weighing in at 10 lbs and only 8 inches tall, now at almost 3 yrs. He is very protective and loyal, and pretty much a lap dog. He loves to play with his toys, and is highly intelligent, often preferring his interactive toys over stuffed ones. I find myself constantly teaching him new words or playing new games. He hates children and often adults, but can warm up to people given a few minutes and a few kind words (treats help this process). He also can be a challenge to walk, being aggressive to other dogs, but responds very well to a clicker and a treat for distraction. So, generally I have had no issues with him on walks, but am always careful. He loves bedtime, and burrows under the covers, sleeping a full 8 hours straight, he gets upset if I roll over and wake him up and will growl at me, lol.
Reality: It’s a fact that puppies are adorable! But the thing about puppies is, well, they grow up. And as they mature, their personality develops and that’s when you really find out whether your Pit Bull is dominant or submissive with people, or whether she is aggressive toward some, none or all dogs. Dog-intolerance and dog-aggression are traits that do not develop in some dogs until they are fully mature. It is possible that the cute little puppy you adopt who is friendly with all other dogs may not like other dogs at all later in life, even dogs she has grown up with and lived with for her entire life. Both nurture (environment) and nature (genetics) play a role in determining a dog’s mature personality. This doesn’t mean that Pit Bull puppies should not be adopted, but if you want to know how big your dog will ultimately be and how she will act around humans and other animals, you may want to consider adopting an adult.
Just like Apple Head and Deer Head Chihuahuas, Teacup Chihuahuas are from the same breed but have a different appearance. A Teacup Chihuahua on average doesn’t weigh more than four pounds. In a household they may need a little more looking after due to their small size. Teacup Chihuahuas can have either short or long hair. Although a Teacup is much smaller in size, they still have the same confident and energetic personality as a full sized Chihuahua. It is also very risky for Teacup Chihuahuas to have puppies due to their size. It can cause many complications and put their life at risk. [34] Compared to the typical lifespan of a Chihuahua a Teacup's lifespan tends to be much shorter due to the health issues they are more prone to have because of their small size.[35]
These dogs are extremely intelligent and learn commands and tricks with ease. They have a zest for life and love to be involved in everything going on around them. They maintain a puppyish demeanor well into adulthood, and that vitality makes them a joy to live with. Once you have met and gotten to know this breed you will wonder how you ever lived without one.

On its formation, the Association of Masters of Harriers and Beagles took over the running of a regular show at Peterborough that had started in 1889, and the Beagle Club in the UK held its first show in 1896.[15] The regular showing of the breed led to the development of a uniform type, and the beagle continued to prove a success up until the outbreak of World War I when all shows were suspended. After the war, the breed was again struggling for survival in the UK: the last of the Pocket Beagles was probably lost during this time, and registrations fell to an all-time low. A few breeders (notably Reynalton Kennels) managed to revive interest in the dog and by World War II, the breed was once again doing well. Registrations dropped again after the end of the war but almost immediately recovered.[20]
Pit bulls were created by crossbreeding bulldogs and terriers to produce a dog that combined the strength of the bulldog with the gameness and agility of the terrier.[6] In the United Kingdom, these dogs were used in blood sports such as bull-baiting and bear-baiting. These blood sports were officially eliminated in 1835, as Britain began to introduce animal welfare laws. Since dogfights were cheaper to organize and far easier to conceal from the law than bull- or bear-baits, blood sport proponents turned to pitting their dogs against each other instead.[5] Dog fighting was used as both a blood sport (often involving gambling) and a way to continue to test the quality of their stock. For decades afterwards, dog fighting took place clandestinely in small areas of Britain and America. In the early 20th century, pit bulls were used as catch dogs in America for semi-wild cattle and hogs, to hunt and drive livestock, and as family companions.[6] Some have been selectively bred for their fighting prowess.[8][9]
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