It’s so easy to fall in love with the Maltese Terrier mix. This dog is a genetic goldmine, having inherited the best traits of its parent breeds. It’s energetic, confident, intelligent, loving, and friendly. It takes so little to make this dog happy. Give it all your love and just the right amount of attention and it will be content. In return, you’ll get the sweetest dog around. However, it’s essential that your dog is also trained and socialized early to curb its negative traits, like anxiety and excessive barking.
While we love terriers of all kinds, there is a special place in our heart for a certain kind of mutt. There are many who will insist on a purebred, but we urge you to consider her cousin the terrier mix. Adopting a mixed breed is the most fulfilling way to bring home a new dog. Whether it is from an animal shelter or rescue organization, you are giving a pooch a new chance at life. Many shelter animals are scheduled to be euthanized, so you just might be saving a life when your bring home one of these animals.

Chihuahuas require regular grooming with a brush and comb for their long coat. The Chihuahua’s claws must be kept trimmed, and its teeth must be checked frequently for tartar buildup. Chihuahuas get cold easily and should be kept in a warm environment. The small nose may cause wheezing or snoring. The Chihuahua should not be overfed. There is typically a soft spot on the top of the skull; this is normal and is usually closed by adulthood. The Chihuahua has a long life span at 14-18 years.


Well, there are a lot of things to love about terriers and terrier mixes. They are known for their spunky tenacity, which can be heart-warming, hilarious and occasionally inspiring. They are also very bright, the result of generations of terrier being used for hunting. What you might not know is that they have a long history of bravery. In fact, there have been a number of terriers that have served in the armed forces and police departments. On top of that, they have been guarding households for centuries.
"We got Stoli (right) 3 years ago when we were in college back east at UNC. The first picture is her at 7 weeks old. She is a short-coat fawn with black sable. As she grew older the black sable faded and she is almost completely fawn except for the black stripe on her tail. We had to work hard to keep her from getting "small dog syndrome, " which makes many toy breeds yappy and disliked by strangers. She bonded with many friends and family members and I took her to class with me and on the bus. I even took her babysitting with me and she now LOVES kids which is not a common trait in small dogs. Because of our hard work to treat her like a dog and not a fragile little toy she is very well behaved and not terrified of people and new surroundings. She also knows over 15 tricks and loves to perform! Stoli is 3.8 pounds and almost 3 years old. Just over a month ago we decided to get a playmate for Stoli that was her own size. This first picture is Roxi at 8 weeks and 15 ounces. She is a longhaired Chihuahua and should get up to 3-3.5 pounds as an adult. Her full long hair will not mature until she is around 1 1/2 years old, and in the meantime she will go through "puppy uglies" which is the awkward teenager stage for long-coated breeds between their puppy and adult coats. Her color is technically black and tan with a partial white collar and white feet. She also has merle markings that give the spotted blue and black pattern to her coat. The merle gene leeches out the most of the color from the black part of her coat leaving the grey/blue areas. It has also affected her eye color, which is marbled blue and brown. The merle Chihuahua is banned from some organizations around the world, but the AKC still allows for it in the show ring. The reason for this is possible health concerns associated with the gene. But we love little Roxi to death and she is completely healthy and growing fast! Walking around town with these two we get stopped constantly to be asked what kind of dogs they are and to tell us how cute they are. Recently we have been hearing kids yell out "Mommy look they are from Beverly Hills!" due to the new Disney movie."
my comment is for all pit owners as being 1 myself ppl say its all in how ya raise them and i do believe thats true to some extent althjo if ya will recall new articals to where pit bulls have attacked every age from toddlers to old folks and everytime its all the same answer or comment my dog has never offered to bite any one he has never been aggressive a dog has a personality just like humans altho it seems like when a pit bull goes off the deep end there is no bringing them back i no that a pit is not the breed of dog that ranks up to the top or near the top for bites when a pit goes to bite he is very aggressive and will not stop untill its prey is dead thats why it has took me so long to get this breed trust is an issue to make a long story short i told my grand kids if she ever bites with aggression i will have her taken away from here n we shall h=get another beagle ( just saying )
Hunters could follow these dogs on foot and could even carry one in a pocket if the need arose. By the 1800s, Beagles existed in several sizes, but the smaller “pocket-size” dogs were particularly popular. These dogs measured only about 9 inches and often needed the hunter’s assistance in crossing rough fields. One of the special appeals of the smaller Beagles was that the hunt could be followed even by “ladies, the aged, or the infirm,” as they slowly followed the winding path of the hare.
The Beagle should look like a miniature Foxhound, and is solid for the size. The Beagle’s moderate size enables the ability to follow on foot. Beagles can also be carried, and they can scurry around in thick underbrush. Their close hard coat protects them from underbrush. Their moderate build enables them to nimbly traverse rough terrain. The Beagle’s amiable personality allows this breed to get along with other dogs and to be a wonderful pet. Beagles are noted for their melodious bay. The deep muzzle allows more room for olfactory receptors, aiding the Beagle’s uncanny sense of smell.

"Yaya is a 5-year-old APBT my wife and I rescued from the Humane Society in Erie, PA. She is great with other dogs and especially a real lover when it comes to people. She is very loyal and loves to smother us with Pitbull kisses. Having gone through a tragic loss in the family a couple of years ago, she has been the best 'therapist' one could ask for. She can be stubborn sometimes; that trait she gets from my wife!"
What a blessed event that you found each other. I have 2 rescues from the local dog shelter, one rat-cha and one cheewinnie , 4 and 3 yeats old. I have a high stress job. When i get home their love helps me forget about all negative nuances of the day. PLEASE spread the word about rescuing animals. They are helpless without us. Take care of your baby girl, thank you for rescuing her.
Pit bull is the common name for a type of dog descended from bulldogs and terriers. The pit bull-type is particularly ambiguous, as it encompasses a range of pedigree breeds, informal types and appearances that cannot be reliably identified.[1] Formal breeds often considered to be of the pit bull-type include the American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, American Bully, and Staffordshire Bull Terrier.[2][3][4] The American Bulldog is also sometimes included.[5] Mixed-breed dogs which physically resemble these breeds often get labelled as "pit bulls" by shelters. Many of these breeds were originally developed as fighting dogs from crossbreeding bull-baiting dogs (used to hold the faces and heads of larger animals such as bulls) and terriers.[5] After the use of dogs in blood sports was banned, such dogs were used as catch dogs in the United States for semi-wild cattle and hogs, to hunt and drive livestock, and as family companions.[6] Despite dog fighting now being illegal in the United States, it still exists as an underground activity, and pit bulls are a common type used.[7][8][9]

One of the most amiable hounds, the Beagle was originally bred to be part of a pack and needs companionship, whether human or canine. This dog loves to explore the outdoors and is an enthusiastic trailer. Given adequate exercise, the Beagle is a calm, tractable house pet. Beagles tend to be excellent with children, gentle, incredibly tolerant, and always ready to join in a game or adventure. This is an independent breed, however, and may run off if a trail beckons. Beagles bark and howl.
The cost of a Chihuahua puppy varies depending on the breeder’s locale, whether he is male or female, whether he’s longhaired or smooth, what titles his parents have, and whether he is best suited for the show ring or a pet home. Prices can range from $400 to $1,600, sometimes higher for puppies with show potential. The cheapest puppy is not always the best, nor is the most expensive. What matters is that the puppy you buy has been raised in a clean home environment, from parents with health clearances and show titles to prove that they are good specimens of the breed. Often, breeders will have puppies spayed or neutered before placing them. Puppies should be temperament tested, vetted, dewormed, and socialized to give them a healthy, confident start in life. 
Hip Dysplasia: This is an inherited condition in which the thighbone doesn't fit snugly into the hip joint. Some dogs show pain and lameness on one or both rear legs, but others don't display outward signs of discomfort. (X-ray screening is the most certain way to diagnose the problem.) Either way, arthritis can develop as the dog ages. Dogs with hip dysplasia should not be bred — so if you're buying a puppy, ask the breeder for proof that the parents have been tested for hip dysplasia and are free of problems.
In several entries you will see that the dog was originally bred for fighting. In noting this, we are simply highlighting the motive for its creation. In no case does this determine the behavior of an individual Pit Bull and under no circumstances does it mean every dog is intended solely for this purpose. All dogs deserve a home with caring and responsible owners willing to meet all their needs. Obviously, clandestine dog fighting is an intolerable practice.
The history of the Chihuahua is quite controversial. According to one theory, it was originally developed in China and then brought to the Americas by Spanish traders, where it was interbred with small native dogs. Others speculate it is of South and Central American origin, descended from a small, mute dog -- the native Techichi -- which was occasionally sacrificed in Toltec religious rites. It was believed that this diminutive red dog guided the soul to the underworld after death. Thus, all Aztec families kept this dog and buried it with the deceased member of the family. (Curiously, the Toltecs and the Aztecs also fed on the Techichi.) When not used in burial rituals, however, the Aztec and Toltec priests and families took great care of the Techichis.
Sites like Petfinder.com and Adopt-a-Pet.com can have you searching for a Chihuahua in your area in no time flat. The site allows you to be very specific in your requests (housetraining status, for example) or very general (all the Chihuahuas available on Petfinder across the country). AnimalShelter.org can help you find animal rescue groups in your area. Also some local newspapers have “pets looking for homes” sections you can review.
As humans became more sophisticated, so did their dogs. Eventually, there emerged specific breeds of dogs, custom-bred to suit the breeders’ local needs and circumstances. The Greyhound, for instance, was the foundation type for the immense Irish Wolfhound and the dainty Italian Greyhound. All three have a distinct family resemblance, but you’d never mistake one for another.
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