The largest state in Mexico, Chihuahua is headquarters for the world’s fifth largest oil company, Pertróleos Mexicanos. It is also where one of the smallest canine breeds, the Chihuahua, originated. After railroad travel to the Copper Canyon area was upgraded following privatization of the railroad in 1998, tourism became an important and growing segment of the economy. Attractions include the beautiful Copper Canyon region and Pancho Villa’s mansion.
The skull should be fairly long, slightly domed at occiput, with cranium broad and full. Ears-Ears set on moderately low, long, reaching when drawn out nearly, if not quite, to the end of the nose; fine in texture, fairly broad-with almost entire absence of erectile power-setting close to the head, with the forward edge slightly inturning to the cheek-rounded at tip. Eyes-Eyes large, set well apart-soft and houndlike-expression gentle and pleading; of a brown or hazel color. Muzzle-Muzzle of medium length-straight and square-cut-the stop moderately defined. Jaws-Level. Lips free from flews; nostrils large and open. Defects-A very flat skull, narrow across the top; excess of dome, eyes small, sharp and terrierlike, or prominent and protruding; muzzle long, snipy or cut away decidedly below the eyes, or very short. Roman-nosed, or upturned, giving a dish-face expression. Ears short, set on high or with a tendency to rise above the point of origin.

They have a smooth, somewhat domed skull with a medium-length, square-cut muzzle and a black (or occasionally liver) gumdrop nose. The jaw is strong and the teeth scissor together with the upper teeth fitting perfectly over the lower teeth and both sets aligned square to the jaw. The eyes are large, hazel or brown, with a mild hound-like pleading look. The large ears are long, soft and low-set, turning towards the cheeks slightly and rounded at the tips. Beagles have a strong, medium-length neck (which is long enough for them to easily bend to the ground to pick up a scent), with little folding in the skin but some evidence of a dewlap; a broad chest narrowing to a tapered abdomen and waist and a long, slightly curved tail (known as the "stern") tipped with white. The white tip, known as the flag. has been selectively bred for, as it allows the dog to be easily seen when its head is down following a scent.[31] The tail does not curl over the back, but is held upright when the dog is active. The beagle has a muscular body and a medium-length, smooth, hard coat. The front legs are straight and carried under the body while the rear legs are muscular and well bent at the stifles.[32]
During the Mexican Revolution, which began in 1910, Chihuahua was again a central battleground. Peasant revolutionary leader Francisco “Pancho” Villa fought throughout Chihuahua, demanding that the peasants be apportioned land and be recognized as legitimate participants in Mexican politics. Villa’s famous Northern Division was first assembled in Chihuahua.

Beagles are pack animals, becoming very attached to their human "pack," and are well-suited to a variety of active families. They are a great choice for families with children. Singles and couples who love the outdoors also match up well with this breed, and his size and even temperament make the Beagle a great companion for active seniors who love to walk but don’t mind going at a slow pace to allow the Beagle to sniff to his heart’s content.
Reverend Phillip Honeywood established a beagle pack in Essex in the 1830s and it is believed that this pack formed the basis for the modern breed. Although details of the pack's lineage are not recorded it is thought that North Country Beagles and Southern Hounds were strongly represented; William Youatt suspected that Harriers formed a good majority of the beagle's bloodline, but the origin of the Harrier is itself obscure.[5] Honeywood's Beagles were small, standing at about 10 inches (25 cm) at the shoulder, and pure white according to John Mills (writing in The Sportsman's Library in 1845). Prince Albert and Lord Winterton also had Beagle packs around this time, and royal favour no doubt led to some revival of interest in the breed, but Honeywood's pack was regarded as the finest of the three.[10]
Beagles are easy-care dogs who don’t need a lot of fancy grooming. A good going-over with a hound mitt once or twice a week removes dead hairs and helps keep them from migrating to clothing and furniture. And that’s the bad news: Beagles shed year-round. The good news: unless your Beagle rolls in something stinky, which is a strong possibility, he shouldn’t need a bath more than three or four times a year.

Chihuahuas are intelligent, graceful, and sometimes too brave for their own good. They usually bond with only one person and become highly devoted, frequently kissing the owner's face (with or without approval). The Chihuahua is reserved around strangers, and may attempt to defend their owner, usually with little effect. Chihuahuas are tenacious, proud, and very energetic.
As for eating, well, Beagles will try to eat anything. They are professional food thieves, and they will eat anything that even looks like it might be food, including things that you wouldn’t imagine would interest them. If nothing else, living with a Beagle will teach you, your spouse and your kids not to leave food of any kind within a Beagle’s nose range.
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