My rescue is Iggyboo, a cairn terrier/Chihuahua mix, weighing in at 10 lbs and only 8 inches tall, now at almost 3 yrs. He is very protective and loyal, and pretty much a lap dog. He loves to play with his toys, and is highly intelligent, often preferring his interactive toys over stuffed ones. I find myself constantly teaching him new words or playing new games. He hates children and often adults, but can warm up to people given a few minutes and a few kind words (treats help this process). He also can be a challenge to walk, being aggressive to other dogs, but responds very well to a clicker and a treat for distraction. So, generally I have had no issues with him on walks, but am always careful. He loves bedtime, and burrows under the covers, sleeping a full 8 hours straight, he gets upset if I roll over and wake him up and will growl at me, lol.
All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit a particular disease. Run, don’t walk, from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee on puppies, who tells you that the breed is 100 percent healthy and has no known problems, or who tells you that her puppies are isolated from the main part of the household for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur in her lines. Here’s a brief rundown on what you should know.

Due to their athleticism and diverse breeding background, the Pit Bull breed tends to be hardy, with an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, longer than many breeds of a similar size. There are some genetic conditions to be watchful for. The Pit Bull tends to suffer from bone diseases such as hip dysplasia, degenerative myelopathy and kneecap dislocation. The Pit Bull can also suffer from skin problems, such as mange and skin allergies, because of its short coat. Other health ailments seen in Pit Bulls include thyroid and congenital heart defects.


The two coat varieties of the Chihuahua have slightly different grooming needs. The smooth-coat Chihuahua will need only occasional brushing and regular baths to look dapper, while the longhaired variety should have his coat brushed at least once a week to avoid any tangles or mats. Both varieties should have their nails trimmed regularly. Good dental care is necessary and should include brushing your dog’s teeth, and the vet might also recommend treats designed as part of a tooth-care program. Check the Chihuahua’s ears regularly, and remove any excess wax or debris to avoid ear infections.
The Beagle is a medium-sized breed belonging to the hound sporting group. Though many variations of this breed have existed throughout history, the modern breed emerged in England in the early 1800s. The Beagle is a popular choice for pet owners because of its size and calm temperament, and is useful for hunters because of its sharp sense of smell.

The Chihuahua loves to run and play and can usually get enough exercise in a very small space. Simply trotting around following their people is usually enough exercise for this happy breed. Short, slow walks will keep your dog in good weight and condition. Avoid overexerting the Chihuahua. If your dog is panting and working hard to keep up, it’s time to pick him up and carry him home.
They were brought to exterminate vermin in those days. Breeds like the Yorkshire Terrier, Skye Terrier, and Irish Terrier were also crossed while developing this breed. These dogs were majorly used as watchdogs, and sometimes, to help control rodents in the gold mines, waterfronts, and on the sheep stations. It is a fast, brave, weather-resistant breed, which will adapt to any living conditions.
Remember that after you’ve taken a new puppy into your home, you have the power to protect him from two of the most common health problems: obesity (which makes other health issues worse) and eating inappropriate objects. Keeping a Beagle at an appropriate weight is one of the easiest ways to extend his life, and close supervision of what he’s chewing on can save you big bucks at the veterinary hospital. Make the most of your preventive abilities to help ensure a healthier dog for life.
 my comment is for all pit owners as being 1 myself ppl say its all in how ya raise them and i do believe thats true to some extent althjo if ya will recall new articals to where pit bulls have attacked every age from toddlers to old folks and everytime its all the same answer or comment my dog has never offered to bite any one he has never been aggressive a dog has a personality just like humans altho it seems like when a pit bull goes off the deep end there is no bringing them back i no that a pit is not the breed of dog that ranks up to the top or near the top for bites when a pit goes to bite he is very aggressive and will not stop untill its prey is dead thats why it has took me so long to get this breed trust is an issue to make a long story short i told my grand kids if she ever bites with aggression i will have her taken away from here n we shall h=get another beagle ( just saying )

The merle coat pattern, which appears mottled, is not traditionally considered part of the breed standard. In May 2007, The Kennel Club decided not to register puppies with this coloration due to the health risks associated with the responsible gene, and in December of that year, formally amended its breed standard to disqualify merle dogs.[20] The Fédération Cynologique Internationale, which represents the major kennel clubs of 84 countries, also disqualified merle.[16] Other countries' kennel clubs, including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Germany, have also disqualified merle. However, in May 2008, the Chihuahua Club of America voted that merles would not be disqualified in the United States, and would be fully registrable and able to compete in AKC events. Opponents of merle recognition suspect the coloration came about by modern crossbreeding with other dogs and not by natural genetic drift.[21][citation needed]
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