Chihuahuas can usually live with other dogs and cats without problem. They get along particularly well with other Chihuahuas. It is important to socialize the Chihuahua as a puppy to prevent overt aggressiveness. Small children may regard the Chihuahua as a toy, and their teasing can cause it to snap or bite. It is preferable not to leave the Chihuahua with children under the age of 12, unless they are well taught or supervised.
Any dog, no matter how nice, can develop obnoxious levels of barking, digging, food stealing and other undesirable behaviors if he is bored, untrained or unsupervised. And any dog can be a trial to live with during adolescence. In the case of the Beagle, the “teen” years can start at six months and continue until the dog is about three years old and sometimes throughout life. Some Beagles just never lose that fun-loving, happy-go-lucky puppy nature. While it makes them entertaining to live with, it also means that they need more supervision than the average adult dog. Fair warning!
Look for a breeder who is a member in good standing of the Chihuahua Club of America and who has agreed to abide by the club's code of ethics. It specifies that its members should evaluate all breeding stock for hereditary faults, never sell dogs to pet stores, and take back Chihuahuas they have bred in the event that the buyer cannot keep them. The CCA lists member breeders on its website, but it’s still important to interview them before buying.
They have a smooth, somewhat domed skull with a medium-length, square-cut muzzle and a black (or occasionally liver) gumdrop nose. The jaw is strong and the teeth scissor together with the upper teeth fitting perfectly over the lower teeth and both sets aligned square to the jaw. The eyes are large, hazel or brown, with a mild hound-like pleading look. The large ears are long, soft and low-set, turning towards the cheeks slightly and rounded at the tips. Beagles have a strong, medium-length neck (which is long enough for them to easily bend to the ground to pick up a scent), with little folding in the skin but some evidence of a dewlap; a broad chest narrowing to a tapered abdomen and waist and a long, slightly curved tail (known as the "stern") tipped with white. The white tip, known as the flag. has been selectively bred for, as it allows the dog to be easily seen when its head is down following a scent.[31] The tail does not curl over the back, but is held upright when the dog is active. The beagle has a muscular body and a medium-length, smooth, hard coat. The front legs are straight and carried under the body while the rear legs are muscular and well bent at the stifles.[32]
Tiny dogs often come with big health problems, and the Chihuahua is no exception. Many Chihuahuas live long, healthy lives, but conditions seen in the breed include breathing difficulties caused by a windpipe that collapses in on itself; luxating patellas; eye disorders; congestive heart disease; certain neurological conditions including hydrocephalus (fluid buildup in and around the brain), neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, a condition in which fatty pigments in the brain cause the progressive loss of brain function, and atlantoaxial subluxation, a neck deformity that may require surgical correction; obesity; and dental problems caused by the small size of their mouths. 
Hip Dysplasia: This is an inherited condition in which the thighbone doesn't fit snugly into the hip joint. Some dogs show pain and lameness on one or both rear legs, but others don't display outward signs of discomfort. (X-ray screening is the most certain way to diagnose the problem.) Either way, arthritis can develop as the dog ages. Dogs with hip dysplasia should not be bred — so if you're buying a puppy, ask the breeder for proof that the parents have been tested for hip dysplasia and are free of problems.
"We got Stoli (right) 3 years ago when we were in college back east at UNC. The first picture is her at 7 weeks old. She is a short-coat fawn with black sable. As she grew older the black sable faded and she is almost completely fawn except for the black stripe on her tail. We had to work hard to keep her from getting "small dog syndrome, " which makes many toy breeds yappy and disliked by strangers. She bonded with many friends and family members and I took her to class with me and on the bus. I even took her babysitting with me and she now LOVES kids which is not a common trait in small dogs. Because of our hard work to treat her like a dog and not a fragile little toy she is very well behaved and not terrified of people and new surroundings. She also knows over 15 tricks and loves to perform! Stoli is 3.8 pounds and almost 3 years old. Just over a month ago we decided to get a playmate for Stoli that was her own size. This first picture is Roxi at 8 weeks and 15 ounces. She is a longhaired Chihuahua and should get up to 3-3.5 pounds as an adult. Her full long hair will not mature until she is around 1 1/2 years old, and in the meantime she will go through "puppy uglies" which is the awkward teenager stage for long-coated breeds between their puppy and adult coats. Her color is technically black and tan with a partial white collar and white feet. She also has merle markings that give the spotted blue and black pattern to her coat. The merle gene leeches out the most of the color from the black part of her coat leaving the grey/blue areas. It has also affected her eye color, which is marbled blue and brown. The merle Chihuahua is banned from some organizations around the world, but the AKC still allows for it in the show ring. The reason for this is possible health concerns associated with the gene. But we love little Roxi to death and she is completely healthy and growing fast! Walking around town with these two we get stopped constantly to be asked what kind of dogs they are and to tell us how cute they are. Recently we have been hearing kids yell out "Mommy look they are from Beverly Hills!" due to the new Disney movie."

Beagles are active, energetic dogs who need at least an hour of exercise every day. This doesn’t mean just letting them out in the backyard. Beagles were bred to work in packs and are happiest when they have company. A Beagle who is left alone inside or outside for long periods of time will tend to become destructive. This can be avoided if he has a companion (whether human or canine) to play with. Beagles are escape artists, so an exercise area must have a fence at least five feet tall that extends underground to prevent tunneling. Walks must always be taken on a leash, because as a scenthound with a very strong hunting instinct, a Beagle will not be able to resist the urge to run off in pursuit of a compelling scent.
Your Beagle’s personality will also be affected by the kind of breeder who produced him. Beagles from breeders who produce hunting dogs are more likely to be hard-charging and demanding of exercise. They are unsuited to lying around the house all day while everyone is at work or school. More laid back Beagles typically come from a breeder who shows dogs in conformation.
I have a 10 year old rat terrier-chihuahua mix who is 17 pounds. He is the sweetest dog I have ever met. He loves people and follows me everywhere around the house. He sleeps most of the day but he needs a daily dose of playtime. The only negative is that he can get aggressive toward other dogs (especially big ones!). But other than that, he is such a sweet and loving companion.
1. American Pit Bull Terrier: this is the breed par excellence from which the other breeds are believed to have been created. Contrary to what some believe, aggression is not a feature of this dog's behavior. American Pitt Bull Terriers have a friendly and balanced nature. They possess great intelligence and a willingness to work. Their weight can range between 13 and 25 kilos (28 and 55 lbs).
And, as far as dogs are concerned, I would love love to have a Bully friend :-) Currently I am mostly thinking between American Staffordshire Terrier, American Pit Bull or American Bulldog. American Bulldogs I know pretty well, Staffordshire some and with the Am. Pit Bulls I haven't had longer experiences. So, please, if you have some article or words of advice which could draw some more detailed comparison, please share. I have of course googled it all, but it all comes down to similar as I thought – they are similar in temperament, only American Bulldogs are better guards and generally a bit calmer/slower (more mastif, less terrier). All of them very gentle, loving, athletic. Is there something more or different you would say?
Chihuahuas occur in virtually any color combination, from solid to marked or splashed,[19] allowing for colors from solid black to solid white, spotted, sabled, or a variety of other colors and patterns. Colors and patterns can combine and affect each other, resulting in a very high degree of variation. Common colors are fawn, red, cream, chocolate, brown, mixed, white, and black. No color or pattern is considered more valuable than another.
Developed from the Bull and Terrier types dogs, the American Pit Bull Terrier can be traced back to the early 1800s in what is now known as the United Kingdom. They were bred as an all-around farm dog, working the farms as a cattle/hog dog. Some chose to turn their talents into the sport of pit-fighting. The breed's tenacity and accompanying strength are unmatched in the canine world. As rich and captivating as the breed's history is, the Pit Bull's future is more worthy of commentary. Some proponents of the breed argue that this breed is the original bulldog of the past. Old prints and woodcarvings show reason to believe this. They show dogs that look exactly like the breed today, doing things the dog is still capable of doing. For more information on this theory you can read books by Richard F. Stratton. The APBT, as registered by the UKC, is an individual breed of dog and does not refer to just any ill-bred, mindless warrior-type mongrel. At one time, the Pit Bull had an all around reputation of a much loved, trustworthy companion. Unfortunately the breed has become a status symbol for many types of criminals who chose to train these dogs to fight. It is those types of people who are chiefly responsible for the banning and witch-hunting that has been sweeping the U.S. The media, however, should not go unmentioned, for it is also responsible for escalating isolated incidences in a relentless and attention-getting way. Most Pit Bulls are bred as family dogs or sports such as weight pulling, but the media will rarely mention this. They get more views pretending all Pit Bulls are bred by fighters. In a lot of cases when the media is reporting about a Pit Bull attacking, it is indeed not even a Pit Bull at all, but a mixed breed of some sort, or another bull breed all together. For example, there was a report on KYW news in Philadelphia about two Pit Bulls attacking a person. The dogs did not look like Pit Bulls, but rather Boxer mixes. The news station was called and asked if they knew the dogs were in fact purebred American Pit Bull Terriers, or another bull breed of some sort, or mutts, for that matter. They stated they did not know, and to call the police station to verify that information. They were asked how they could report something that they were not sure of. They had no answer and they were not sure of the dogs’ breeds. Even after admitting on the phone that they did not in fact know the breeds of the dogs in question, they kept calling the dogs Pit Bulls in their reports. Why? Because the name Pit Bull will draw out the most attention from the public. The Pit Bull's future has been perhaps irreparably undone and everyone is to blame except the dog itself. This very loyal dog is too set on pleasing his owner, and ironically this is the root of his own undoing. Accompanying this need to please are remarkable abilities of all kinds. Jack Dempsy, Teddy Roosevelt and Jack Johnson are just a few people who have owned Pit Bulls. Pit Bulls excel in practically every canine task including herding, guarding, hunting, policing, cart pulling and ratting. A Pit Bull named Banddog Dread holds more canine working titles than ANY other breed. The owner's name is Diane Jessup and you can reference her book "The Working Pit Bull." It tells all of Dread's accomplishments. These dogs are truly capable of many tasks. The difference between Pits and American Staffordshire Terriers is a difficult one. Even breeders can't agree. The main difference is the bloodline. Amstaffs are show dogs and dog fighters usually do not use dogs with Amstaff blood. As time progresses there will be more of a difference. Many are dual registered as Amstaffs with the AKC and Pits with the UKC.
Your American Pit Bull Terrier must be kept on leash in public to prevent aggression toward other dogs. It's not a good idea to let these dogs run loose in dog parks. While they might not start a fight, they'll never back down from one, and they fight to the finish. American Pit Bulls who aren't properly socialized as puppies can become aggressive toward other dogs.
I wish I knew what my precious little girl is. She looks like a chihuahua terrier mix, but I have no way of checking. I am her third mom and she is so smart, has the knee slip thing and probably the cough thing. She follows me around all the time and loves to chase squirrels. She weighs 7 lbs, has floppy ears, light brown legs and black and brown hair on her back. She’s two years old has a brown black and white muzzle with large brown eyes and cutest face. Also she is short haired. I don’t know how to put a picture here or I would.
Luxating patellas are an orthopedic problem. The patella, or kneecap, of most very small dogs, including the Chihuahua, can very easily become displaced, causing pain and lameness. In mild cases the knee quickly slips back into place on its own, but severe cases must be corrected surgically. Ask your veterinarian to examine your dog's knees regularly, especially if you notice him limping or "bunny hopping" while running.
For thousands of years dogs have been bred. From time to time humans have done inbreeding even from their own ancestral lines and also by mixing them from various lines. Over the centuries the whole breeding process is continuing until the present day, resulting in a huge genetically diversity of all types of dogs, breeds and hybrids, no other mammal can present. Furthermore no speciation developed, despite the appearance of a wide variation of dogs no other animal could obtain. Just compare the extreme difference between a Chihuahua and a Great Dane.
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