Feisty is the word most often used to describe terriers. From the Latin terra, for earth, most terriers were originally bred to "go to ground" after burrowing vermin, larger rodents and even foxes. These fiery little dynamos would dig up underground dens and burrows while barking furiously, forcing the inhabitants out where hunters awaited. Some breeds were even bred to finish the job themselves. Let loose in your backyard, a terrier can build an entire golf course in a day — the 18 holes at least. Too large to go to ground, the popular Airedale terrier puts its strength and stubborn streak to use as a surprisingly ferocious watchdog. Like most terriers, this "king of terriers" has little time for other dogs, and if not properly supervised may engage in some street brawling. If it weren't for the fact that most terriers, such as the Cairn and the Norfolk, are fairly small, their tenacious nature and boundless energy would make them hard to control. Due to some unscrupulous breeders and unmindful owners, a few breeds within the terrier group have developed rather notorious reputations. The crossing of bulldogs and terriers for the express purpose of creating fighting dogs has produced several dog breeds that can be dangerous in the wrong hands. Combining the taut muscles and compact power of the bulldog with the tenacity and aggressiveness of the terrier, some controversial bull terrier breeds have been involved in some highly publicized biting incidents, several involving small children. When these dogs bite, they don't let go. Unfortunately, these incidents tarnish the reputations of what can be friendly, stable, even calm pets. But without the right training and socialization, and in irresponsible hands, these can be dangerous dogs.
In rare cases, beagles may develop immune mediated polygenic arthritis (where the immune system attacks the joints) even at a young age. The symptoms can sometimes be relieved by steroid treatments.[49] Another rare disease in the breed is neonatal cerebellar cortical degeneration. Affected puppies are slow, have lower co-ordination, fall more often and don't have a normal gait. It has an estimated carrier rate of 5% and affected rate of 0.1%. A genetic test is available.[53][54]
Breed standards for this dog do not generally specify a height; only a weight and a description of their overall proportions. Generally, the height ranges between 6 and 9 in (15 and 23 cm);[11] however, some dogs grow as tall as 30 to 38 cm (12 to 15 in).[14] Both British and American breed standards state that a Chihuahua must not weigh more than 5.9 lb (2.7 kg) for conformation.[11] However, the British standard also states that a weight of 4–6 lb (1.8–2.7 kg) is preferred. A clause stating. "if two dogs are equally good in type, the more diminutive one is preferred" was removed in 2009.[15] The Fédération Cynologique Internationale standard calls for dogs ideally between 1.5 and 3.0 kg (3.3 and 6.6 lb), although smaller ones are acceptable in the show ring.[16]
The Pit Bull’s origins can be traced back to early 19th-century England, Ireland and Scotland. The canine’s ancestors were the result of experimentally crossbreeding different Bulldog and Terrier breeds for the purpose of bear- and bull-baiting, a blood sport in which the dog was trained to attack until the larger animal was defeated. When baiting was banned in the 1800s, the dogs were then bred for the sport of ratting and dog fighting. European immigrants introduced the Pit Bull breed to North America.
Breeders must agree to have all test results, positive or negative, published in the CHIC database. A dog need not receive good or even passing scores on the evaluations to obtain a CHIC number, so CHIC registration alone is not proof of soundness or absence of disease, but all test results are posted on the CHIC website and can be accessed by anyone who wants to check the health of a puppy’s parents. If the breeder tells you she doesn't need to do those tests because she's never had problems in her lines and her dogs have been "vet checked," then you should go find a breeder who is more rigorous about genetic testing.

I have a 10 year old rat terrier-chihuahua mix who is 17 pounds. He is the sweetest dog I have ever met. He loves people and follows me everywhere around the house. He sleeps most of the day but he needs a daily dose of playtime. The only negative is that he can get aggressive toward other dogs (especially big ones!). But other than that, he is such a sweet and loving companion.
The biggest trick to training a Beagle is to make everything you do with him seem like fun. Never try to force a Beagle to do anything, and never count on a Beagle to be obedient unless you can offer treats as an incentive. This is one breed where it’s important to keep in mind that old saying about catching more flies with honey than with vinegar.
The Chihuahua loves to run and play and can usually get enough exercise in a very small space. Simply trotting around following their people is usually enough exercise for this happy breed. Short, slow walks will keep your dog in good weight and condition. Avoid overexerting the Chihuahua. If your dog is panting and working hard to keep up, it’s time to pick him up and carry him home.
A very common misconception is that APBTs are muscle-bound hulks that weigh in around 85 pounds (39 kg) or more and this is generally not the majority. Most of the APBT's that are that large have been crossed with other breeds and are being called American Bullies. The general public often gets American Bullies mixed up with the American Pitbull Terriers. American Pitbull Terrier vs. American Bully

As for eating, well, Beagles will try to eat anything. They are professional food thieves, and they will eat anything that even looks like it might be food, including things that you wouldn’t imagine would interest them. If nothing else, living with a Beagle will teach you, your spouse and your kids not to leave food of any kind within a Beagle’s nose range.


Feisty is the word most often used to describe terriers. From the Latin terra, for earth, most terriers were originally bred to "go to ground" after burrowing vermin, larger rodents and even foxes. These fiery little dynamos would dig up underground dens and burrows while barking furiously, forcing the inhabitants out where hunters awaited. Some breeds were even bred to finish the job themselves. Let loose in your backyard, a terrier can build an entire golf course in a day — the 18 holes at least. Too large to go to ground, the popular Airedale terrier puts its strength and stubborn streak to use as a surprisingly ferocious watchdog. Like most terriers, this "king of terriers" has little time for other dogs, and if not properly supervised may engage in some street brawling. If it weren't for the fact that most terriers, such as the Cairn and the Norfolk, are fairly small, their tenacious nature and boundless energy would make them hard to control. Due to some unscrupulous breeders and unmindful owners, a few breeds within the terrier group have developed rather notorious reputations. The crossing of bulldogs and terriers for the express purpose of creating fighting dogs has produced several dog breeds that can be dangerous in the wrong hands. Combining the taut muscles and compact power of the bulldog with the tenacity and aggressiveness of the terrier, some controversial bull terrier breeds have been involved in some highly publicized biting incidents, several involving small children. When these dogs bite, they don't let go. Unfortunately, these incidents tarnish the reputations of what can be friendly, stable, even calm pets. But without the right training and socialization, and in irresponsible hands, these can be dangerous dogs.
My husband & I just last week adopted a 2 month old female chihuahua/terrier mix from a shelter. She’s brindle colored and was named “Sassy” by the shelter. We changed her name to “VITA”, which in Italian means life. Being as my husband is half Sicilian, he chose that name for her. And she is definitely full of life! Just the sweetest little pup. Good luck with yours 🙂
There are subcategories as working dogs, companion dogs, herding dogs, guard dogs, hunting dogs and sled dogs. Working dogs are for example lapdogs, who are used as therapy dogs. Companion dogs are just providing companionship and are known as pets and who are usually not used for specific tasks. Herding dogs are known as stock dog and they are working with livestock. They are also called pastoral dogs, who do not necessarily have to be trained in herding. Guard dogs defend the property of people. They are also named watch dogs or attack dogs. They bark aloud, when there is a presence of a possible intruder and alert in this way their owners. Hunting dog hunts with or for their owners. There are a lot of different types of dogs, who have the special hunting skills. Sled dogs are also named sledge dogs or sleigh dogs, who were bred historically for pulling sleds to transport or haul supplies into areas which are inaccessible by another method.
Although Chihuahuas are prized for their small size, they're often fed to obesity. A Chihuahua's skeleton is not designed to carry much weight, and even a few extra ounces can be a significant burden to a dog this size. As with all dogs, leanness is far healthier – and cheaper, when it comes to veterinary costs. Keeping a Chihuahua lean is particularly important if he has luxating patellas.
By looking at descriptions and images of different terrier breeds, you may get a better idea at what the genetic makeup is of your dog. If you are really curious about the heritage of your terrier mix breeds and have the means to do so, there are a variety of interesting genetic testing options available to dig further in their DNA. But just by browsing through the breeds, you may find yourself looking at a canine face that is a little familiar.
I have a 10 year old rat terrier-chihuahua mix who is 17 pounds. He is the sweetest dog I have ever met. He loves people and follows me everywhere around the house. He sleeps most of the day but he needs a daily dose of playtime. The only negative is that he can get aggressive toward other dogs (especially big ones!). But other than that, he is such a sweet and loving companion.

And before you decide to buy a puppy, consider whether an adult Beagle might better suit your needs and lifestyle. Puppies are loads of fun, but they require a lot of time and effort before they grow up to become the dog of your dreams. An adult Beagle may already have some training and will probably be less active, destructive and demanding than a puppy. With an adult, you know more about what you’re getting in terms of personality and health and you can find adults through breeders or shelters. If you are interested in acquiring an older dog through breeders, ask them about purchasing a retired show dog or if they know of an adult dog who needs a new home. If you want to adopt a dog, read the advice below on how to do that.
Forequarters: Shoulders – Lean, sloping into a slightly broadening support above straight forelegs that set well under, giving free movement at the elbows. Shoulders should be well up, giving balance and soundness, sloping into a level back (never down or low). This gives a well developed chest and strength of forequarters. Feet – A small, dainty foot with toes well split up but not spread, pads cushioned. (Neither the hare nor the cat foot.) Dewclaws may be removed. Pasterns – Strong.
There is also the issue of puppy mills that supply many pet stores. These are commercial breeding facilities that prioritize profit over decent treatment of dogs. The reprehensible conditions at many of these facilities result in traumatized dogs that have numerous health and behavior issues. By avoiding purchasing a dog originating from a puppy mill, you are voting with your pocketbook and not supporting these practices.
The smallest breed of dog, the Chihuahua has a controversial history. One theory holds that it originated in China and was brought to the New World by Spanish traders, where it was then crossed with small native dogs. The other theory contends that it originated entirely in Central and South America, descending from the native Techichi. A small red dog was believed to guide the soul to the underworld, and every Aztec family kept such a dog that was buried with any deceased family member. To make matters worse for the Techichi, the Toltecs and their conquerors, the Aztecs, often ate dogs and the Techichi may have sometimes been on the menu. Despite what may have been short lives, the Techichis apparently were well cared for during life by the priests or their families. In fact, the most likely origin of the Chihuahua is a combination of these theories: the native Techichi was probably crossed with tiny hairless Chinese dogs, but again the date when this occurred is controversial.
Not all of these conditions are detectable in a growing puppy, and it is impossible to predict whether an animal will be free of these maladies, which is why you must find a reputable breeder who is committed to breeding the healthiest animals possible.  They should be able to produce independent certification that the parents of the dog (and grandparents, etc.) have been screened for common defects and deemed healthy for breeding. That’s where health registries come in.
According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, "owners of pit bull-type dogs deal with a strong breed stigma; however, controlled studies have not identified this breed group as disproportionately dangerous."[1] Because owners of stigmatized breeds are more likely to have involvement in criminal or violent acts, breed correlations may have the owner's behavior as the underlying causal factor.[1] Some jurisdictions have enacted legislation banning the group of breeds, and some insurance companies do not cover liability from pit bull bites. Among other roles, pit bulls have served as police dogs, search and rescue dogs, and several have appeared on film.
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