A very common misconception is that APBTs are muscle-bound hulks that weigh in around 85 pounds (39 kg) or more and this is generally not the majority. Most of the APBT's that are that large have been crossed with other breeds and are being called American Bullies. The general public often gets American Bullies mixed up with the American Pitbull Terriers. American Pitbull Terrier vs. American Bully
Feisty is the word most often used to describe terriers. From the Latin terra, for earth, most terriers were originally bred to "go to ground" after burrowing vermin, larger rodents and even foxes. These fiery little dynamos would dig up underground dens and burrows while barking furiously, forcing the inhabitants out where hunters awaited. Some breeds were even bred to finish the job themselves. Let loose in your backyard, a terrier can build an entire golf course in a day — the 18 holes at least. Too large to go to ground, the popular Airedale terrier puts its strength and stubborn streak to use as a surprisingly ferocious watchdog. Like most terriers, this "king of terriers" has little time for other dogs, and if not properly supervised may engage in some street brawling. If it weren't for the fact that most terriers, such as the Cairn and the Norfolk, are fairly small, their tenacious nature and boundless energy would make them hard to control. Due to some unscrupulous breeders and unmindful owners, a few breeds within the terrier group have developed rather notorious reputations. The crossing of bulldogs and terriers for the express purpose of creating fighting dogs has produced several dog breeds that can be dangerous in the wrong hands. Combining the taut muscles and compact power of the bulldog with the tenacity and aggressiveness of the terrier, some controversial bull terrier breeds have been involved in some highly publicized biting incidents, several involving small children. When these dogs bite, they don't let go. Unfortunately, these incidents tarnish the reputations of what can be friendly, stable, even calm pets. But without the right training and socialization, and in irresponsible hands, these can be dangerous dogs.
A related bit of information is that Beagles love to eat. Love it! And they are creative about finding and accessing food. Experienced owners put food, trash cans and anything else that might appear or smell edible to a Beagle well out of reach. On the plus side, that love of food comes in handy for training Beagles. They’ll do just about anything for a treat.

The Pit Bull immediately strikes one as being a dog of power, passion and undying willingness. The brick-like head, which is especially broad between the cheeks (to house the powerful jaws), is carried upon a thickly muscled, well-defined neck. The neck runs into a deep, thick, well-sprung chest. The American Pit Bull is a very muscular, stocky, yet agile dog that is extremely strong for his size.The tail tapers to a point. The ears are generally cropped, though this is optional. Docked tails are not accepted by the UKC or the ADBA. The eyes are round. Both the ADBA and the UKC do not accept blue eyes or the coat color merle. The American Pitbull Registry does accept a merle coat. The teeth should form a scissors bite. Its coat is made up of thick, short, shiny hair. All colors are admissible. Shades of brown to red with a matching red/brown nose are referred to as red-nose Pit Bulls. Shades of gray with a matching gray nose are referred to as blue-nose Pit Bulls.
Beagles are the dog breed most often used in animal testing, due to their size and passive nature. In the United States, as many as 65,000 beagles are used every year for medical, cosmetic, beauty, and other chemical tests. They are purpose bred and live their lives in cages undergoing experiments.[68] The Rescue + Freedom Project (formerly Beagle Freedom Project) has successfully advocated for beagles to be released from labs. This organization has freed hundreds of animals.[69]
This breed requires expert veterinary attention in areas such as birthing and dental care. Dental care is a must for these small dogs, whose jaw size makes for weaker teeth. Although daily brushing provides the best preventive measure, feeding a dental diet or using dental chews for dogs is an effective approach pet owners can take to help prevent and control accumulation of plaque and tartar to avoid consequences of severe periodontal disease.[36] The best physical characteristics of dog food to contribute to cleaning a dog's teeth would be food that is large and dense, so more time is spent chewing, which leads to the surface of the teeth being cleaned.
Their long floppy ears can mean that the inner ear does not receive a substantial air flow or that moist air becomes trapped, and this can lead to ear infections. Beagles may also be affected by a range of eye problems; two common ophthalmic conditions in beagles are glaucoma and corneal dystrophy.[55] "Cherry eye", a prolapse of the gland of the third eyelid, and distichiasis, a condition in which eyelashes grow into the eye causing irritation, sometimes exist; both these conditions can be corrected with surgery.[49] They can suffer from several types of retinal atrophy. Failure of the nasolacrimal drainage system can cause dry eye or leakage of tears onto the face.[49]
In the 1840s, a standard beagle type was beginning to develop; the distinction between the North Country Beagle and Southern Hound had been lost, but there was still a large variation in size, character, and reliability among the emerging packs.[12] In 1856, "Stonehenge" (the pseudonym of John Henry Walsh), writing in the Manual of British Rural Sports, was still dividing beagles into four varieties: the medium beagle; the dwarf or lapdog beagle; the fox beagle (a smaller, slower version of the Foxhound); and the rough-coated or terrier beagle, which he classified as a cross between any of the other varieties and one of the Scottish terrier breeds.[13] Stonehenge also gives the start of a standard description:
Developed from the Bull and Terrier types dogs, the American Pit Bull Terrier can be traced back to the early 1800s in what is now known as the United Kingdom. They were bred as an all-around farm dog, working the farms as a cattle/hog dog. Some chose to turn their talents into the sport of pit-fighting. The breed's tenacity and accompanying strength are unmatched in the canine world. As rich and captivating as the breed's history is, the Pit Bull's future is more worthy of commentary. Some proponents of the breed argue that this breed is the original bulldog of the past. Old prints and woodcarvings show reason to believe this. They show dogs that look exactly like the breed today, doing things the dog is still capable of doing. For more information on this theory you can read books by Richard F. Stratton. The APBT, as registered by the UKC, is an individual breed of dog and does not refer to just any ill-bred, mindless warrior-type mongrel. At one time, the Pit Bull had an all around reputation of a much loved, trustworthy companion. Unfortunately the breed has become a status symbol for many types of criminals who chose to train these dogs to fight. It is those types of people who are chiefly responsible for the banning and witch-hunting that has been sweeping the U.S. The media, however, should not go unmentioned, for it is also responsible for escalating isolated incidences in a relentless and attention-getting way. Most Pit Bulls are bred as family dogs or sports such as weight pulling, but the media will rarely mention this. They get more views pretending all Pit Bulls are bred by fighters. In a lot of cases when the media is reporting about a Pit Bull attacking, it is indeed not even a Pit Bull at all, but a mixed breed of some sort, or another bull breed all together. For example, there was a report on KYW news in Philadelphia about two Pit Bulls attacking a person. The dogs did not look like Pit Bulls, but rather Boxer mixes. The news station was called and asked if they knew the dogs were in fact purebred American Pit Bull Terriers, or another bull breed of some sort, or mutts, for that matter. They stated they did not know, and to call the police station to verify that information. They were asked how they could report something that they were not sure of. They had no answer and they were not sure of the dogs’ breeds. Even after admitting on the phone that they did not in fact know the breeds of the dogs in question, they kept calling the dogs Pit Bulls in their reports. Why? Because the name Pit Bull will draw out the most attention from the public. The Pit Bull's future has been perhaps irreparably undone and everyone is to blame except the dog itself. This very loyal dog is too set on pleasing his owner, and ironically this is the root of his own undoing. Accompanying this need to please are remarkable abilities of all kinds. Jack Dempsy, Teddy Roosevelt and Jack Johnson are just a few people who have owned Pit Bulls. Pit Bulls excel in practically every canine task including herding, guarding, hunting, policing, cart pulling and ratting. A Pit Bull named Banddog Dread holds more canine working titles than ANY other breed. The owner's name is Diane Jessup and you can reference her book "The Working Pit Bull." It tells all of Dread's accomplishments. These dogs are truly capable of many tasks. The difference between Pits and American Staffordshire Terriers is a difficult one. Even breeders can't agree. The main difference is the bloodline. Amstaffs are show dogs and dog fighters usually do not use dogs with Amstaff blood. As time progresses there will be more of a difference. Many are dual registered as Amstaffs with the AKC and Pits with the UKC.
Beagles imports began arriving in America in the years after the Civil War, and their popularity among U.S. rabbit hunters was immediate. The AKC registered its first Beagle, named Blunder, in 1885. To this day, “beaglers” in woodsy areas of North America still swear by their breed’s great nose, musical voice, and enthusiastic approach to rabbit hunting.

The Pit Bull immediately strikes one as being a dog of power, passion and undying willingness. The brick-like head, which is especially broad between the cheeks (to house the powerful jaws), is carried upon a thickly muscled, well-defined neck. The neck runs into a deep, thick, well-sprung chest. The American Pit Bull is a very muscular, stocky, yet agile dog that is extremely strong for his size.The tail tapers to a point. The ears are generally cropped, though this is optional. Docked tails are not accepted by the UKC or the ADBA. The eyes are round. Both the ADBA and the UKC do not accept blue eyes or the coat color merle. The American Pitbull Registry does accept a merle coat. The teeth should form a scissors bite. Its coat is made up of thick, short, shiny hair. All colors are admissible. Shades of brown to red with a matching red/brown nose are referred to as red-nose Pit Bulls. Shades of gray with a matching gray nose are referred to as blue-nose Pit Bulls.
Glaucoma: This is a painful disease in which pressure in the eye becomes abnormally high. Eyes are constantly producing and draining a fluid called aqueous humor — if the fluid doesn't drain correctly, the pressure inside the eye increases causing damage to the optic nerve and resulting in vision loss and blindness. There are two types. Primary glaucoma, which is hereditary, and secondary glaucoma which is a result of inflammation, a tumor, or injury. Glaucoma generally affects one eye first, which will be red, teary, squinty, and appear painful. A dilated pupil won't react to light, and the front of the eye will have a whitish, almost blue cloudiness. Vision loss and eventually blindness will result, sometimes even with treatment (surgery or medication, depending on the case).
I have a chiuhuahua border terrier cross. He’s just about 16 months old. It’s just me and my husband and he loves us equally. He hates kids, always barks and growls at them. He surprisingly likes most other people, unless my husband isn’t around, he gets protective over me if men come around me. He likes all dogs, big and small. He jumps at them and is very playful. He’s also very snugly and sweet. I have noticed the tranchea problem with him though and also his eyes water all the time. He’s fixed and still only weighs about 5 lbs. he’s been hard to potty train- he wouldn’t go out into the snow until this year. I usually have to carry him on walks in cold and wet weather because he’s always shivering. he’s inquisitive, likes to wander.. we have to keep a close eye on him at the dog parks because he can wiggle his way under the fence to run after the dogs! Definitely the best dog I ever had, he’s got the most unique personality, he’s not ‘yappy’ for the most part.. just at night when I’m trying to sleep lol.

Pictures and stories about dog fighting. We're sympathetic, and we hate that it goes on. And yes, the pictures of abused and mutilated dogs should make any grown man with half of a soul shed a tear. But we don't want to foster that kind of negative attitude on this site. This is a positive place to celebrate these great companions, learn more about them, and network with other owners and dog lovers.
These dogs are skillful, long living, and have a temperament which simply suits humans. They developed a solid red color later in their evolution before which, they were gray and brindle. They are also known for their courage and dominance, which is paired with a peaceful and eager-to-please attitude that they have towards the family members. Being a hyper breed, mental and physical exercises are essential. Overall, they are loyal, intelligent, and great as watchdogs.
Although Chihuahuas are prized for their small size, they're often fed to obesity. A Chihuahua's skeleton is not designed to carry much weight, and even a few extra ounces can be a significant burden to a dog this size. As with all dogs, leanness is far healthier – and cheaper, when it comes to veterinary costs. Keeping a Chihuahua lean is particularly important if he has luxating patellas.
With a compact size, easy-care coat and happy nature, the Beagle has long had a place as one of the most popular breeds for families. Beagles are also used as scent detection dogs at U.S. airports, where their friendliness allows them to search for weapons, drugs, and illegal food items without making passengers nervous the way a larger “police dog” might. The breed was developed in England to hunt rabbits, and Beagles are still happiest when following their noses. For that reason, they belong to a category of dogs known as scenthounds.
Another myth about Pit Bull type dogs is that they have a locked jaw which is impossible to break. While many of these dogs do indeed have a strong bite, it is a myth that their jaw locks. It can be broken using a bite stick or by some of the other ways mentioned in our article on breaking a Pit Bull's bite. Another important factor in Pit Bulls is the tendency to dock their tails and ears which makes it more difficult to recognize the signs of aggression in these dogs.
By 1887 the threat of extinction was on the wane: there were 18 beagle packs in England.[14] The Beagle Club was formed in 1890 and the first standard drawn up at the same time.[15] The following year the Association of Masters of Harriers and Beagles was formed. Both organisations aimed to further the best interests of the breed, and both were keen to produce a standard type of beagle.[16] By 1902, the number of packs had risen to 44.[14]
Beagles are used in a range of research procedures: fundamental biological research, applied human medicine, applied veterinary medicine, and protection of man, animals or the environment.[70][71] Of the 8,018 dogs used in testing in the UK in 2004, 7,799 were beagles (97.3%).[72] In the UK, the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 gave special status to primates, equids, cats and dogs and in 2005 the Animal Procedures Committee (set up by the act) ruled that testing on mice was preferable, even though a greater number of individual animals were involved.[73] In 2005 beagles were involved in less than 0.3% of the total experiments on animals in the UK, but of the 7670 experiments performed on dogs 7406 involved beagles (96.6%).[70] Most dogs are bred specifically for this purpose, by companies such as Harlan. In the UK companies breeding animals for research must be licensed under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act.[73]
"These are our Chi babies, from left: Maxwell (6 months), Milo (9 months) and Matilda (also 9 months). While Milo and Matilda are on the bigger side of the Chi scale at 7 and 9 lbs., Maxwell is on the more average size at about 4½ lbs. Milo is a bit more on the lazy side compared to the other two and sometimes will just sit and watch the others play. He is also a bit insecure which we are working on with him. They are all very loving however and are always anxious to share kisses with their humans and with each other alike. Sometimes they'll lie in the sun bathing each other’s faces and making sure they are all looking their best. Then they will burrow in blankets, pillows, etc. until they fluff it up just enough to get comfortable and then proceed to take a long nap. While none of them are the "alpha" (that's the humans job, isn't it?!) our female, Matilda is by far the most bossy out of the group. If she wants to play, you'd better play or else you'll get a "donkey kick" until she gets a reaction. Typical female! (and yes, I can say that because I AM a female! :o)
Another myth about Pit Bull type dogs is that they have a locked jaw which is impossible to break. While many of these dogs do indeed have a strong bite, it is a myth that their jaw locks. It can be broken using a bite stick or by some of the other ways mentioned in our article on breaking a Pit Bull's bite. Another important factor in Pit Bulls is the tendency to dock their tails and ears which makes it more difficult to recognize the signs of aggression in these dogs.
They are a cross between the Old English black and tan terriers (Welsh terrier) and the otterhounds. They are tall and have a very lovable expression, medium hair on the body, and a long elongated face. They have a curly and rough coat, and a soft undercoat. The color is a black and tan combination. During the early 19th century, these dogs were used for sporting events which featured catching of large river rats; hence they possess an instinct to chase small animals. During World War I, these dogs were also used by the armed forces as messengers for mails, and to find wounded soldiers behind enemy lines. Overall, they are loyal, caring, and will guard you and your family.
Glaucoma: This is a painful disease in which pressure in the eye becomes abnormally high. Eyes are constantly producing and draining a fluid called aqueous humor — if the fluid doesn't drain correctly, the pressure inside the eye increases causing damage to the optic nerve and resulting in vision loss and blindness. There are two types. Primary glaucoma, which is hereditary, and secondary glaucoma which is a result of inflammation, a tumor, or injury. Glaucoma generally affects one eye first, which will be red, teary, squinty, and appear painful. A dilated pupil won't react to light, and the front of the eye will have a whitish, almost blue cloudiness. Vision loss and eventually blindness will result, sometimes even with treatment (surgery or medication, depending on the case).
It is really common. They are Chi’s at heart sometimes and they are bred as lap/companion dogs so they are naturally very protective of their owners. Especially to Larger dogs and humans. What I have found with my baby girl is that she has what I call “big dog syndrome.’ As in she thinks she is much bigger than she is. She’ll get up in another dogs face in a heartbeat if it meant telling them to stay away from me. Once I pet that dog and talk to her when I do it she calms down and after 5-10 minutes she is best friends with them. Humans too. lol. It is just their way of being there for you too. Even if it is unwanted. Best thing is to roll with it and show them its alright and eventually they learn. they are so smart.
From medieval times, beagle was used as a generic description for the smaller hounds, though these dogs differed considerably from the modern breed. Miniature breeds of beagle-type dogs were known from the times of Edward II and Henry VII, who both had packs of Glove Beagles, so named since they were small enough to fit on a glove, and Queen Elizabeth I kept a breed known as a Pocket Beagle, which stood 8 to 9 inches (20 to 23 cm) at the shoulder. Small enough to fit in a "pocket" or saddlebag, they rode along on the hunt. The larger hounds would run the prey to ground, then the hunters would release the small dogs to continue the chase through underbrush. Elizabeth I referred to the dogs as her singing beagles and often entertained guests at her royal table by letting her Pocket Beagles cavort amid their plates and cups.[6] 19th-century sources refer to these breeds interchangeably and it is possible that the two names refer to the same small variety. In George Jesse's Researches into the History of the British Dog from 1866, the early 17th-century poet and writer Gervase Markham is quoted referring to the beagle as small enough to sit on a man's hand and to the:
I have a 10 year old rat terrier-chihuahua mix who is 17 pounds. He is the sweetest dog I have ever met. He loves people and follows me everywhere around the house. He sleeps most of the day but he needs a daily dose of playtime. The only negative is that he can get aggressive toward other dogs (especially big ones!). But other than that, he is such a sweet and loving companion.

In a 1520 letter, Hernan Cortés wrote that the Aztecs raised and sold the little dogs as food.[7] Colonial records refer to small, nearly hairless dogs at the beginning of the 19th century, one of which claims 16th-century Conquistadores found them plentiful in the region later known as Chihuahua.[8] Small dogs such as Chihuahuas were also used as living heating pads during illness or injury. Some believe this practice is where the idea of pain being transferred to animals from humans originated, which gave way to rituals such as burning the deceased with live dogs, such as the Techichi, to exonerate the deceased human's sins.[9] Chihuahuas as we know them today remained a rarity until the early 20th century; the American Kennel Club (AKC) did not register a Chihuahua until 1904.[10]
We own a 10 lb chi/terrier mix who has some serious itchy under belly hair loss going on. She has tested negative for allergies and has been on hydrolyzed food now for a month with no changes to her hair loss. She also takes appoquel daily. Along with this, she will randomly pee in the house. She seems like a very bright dog, so this trait is very frustrating. Not sure what the next step will be but would appreciate hearing from others in this situation.
Due to their athleticism and diverse breeding background, the Pit Bull breed tends to be hardy, with an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, longer than many breeds of a similar size. There are some genetic conditions to be watchful for. The Pit Bull tends to suffer from bone diseases such as hip dysplasia, degenerative myelopathy and kneecap dislocation. The Pit Bull can also suffer from skin problems, such as mange and skin allergies, because of its short coat. Other health ailments seen in Pit Bulls include thyroid and congenital heart defects.
It is not known why the black and tan Kerry Beagle, present in Ireland since Celtic times, has the beagle description, since at 22 to 24 inches (56 to 61 cm) it is significantly taller than the modern day beagle, and in earlier times was even larger. Some writers suggest that the beagle's scenting ability may have come from cross-breeding earlier strains with the Kerry Beagle. Originally used for hunting stags, it is today used for hare and drag hunting.[28]
In the 11th century, William the Conqueror brought the Talbot hound to Britain. The Talbot was a predominantly white, slow, deep-throated, scent hound derived from the St. Hubert Hound which had been developed in the 8th century. At some point the English Talbots were crossed with Greyhounds to give them an extra turn of speed.[4] Beagles are similar to the Harrier and the extinct Southern Hound, though smaller and slower.[5][b]
A related bit of information is that Beagles love to eat. Love it! And they are creative about finding and accessing food. Experienced owners put food, trash cans and anything else that might appear or smell edible to a Beagle well out of reach. On the plus side, that love of food comes in handy for training Beagles. They’ll do just about anything for a treat.
Despite the many endearing qualities of the Chihuahua, if you’re thinking his tiny size makes him a great choice for children, you’d better think again. The Chihuahua may be just right for traveling around in a puppy purse, but he’s far too small and fragile for even the gentlest of children's games. Chihuahuas also tend to be high-strung and prone to nipping, snapping and even biting when frightened or threatened, or when defending his people or territory.

According to the American Temperament Test Society[1], the Pit Bull is second only to the Labrador Retriever in terms of temperament. The test was carried out on as many breeds as possible, administering and recording the test to find out which breeds met the highest standards in terms of temperament. This involved meeting oddly dressed strangers, firing guns to potentially spook them, walking on uncomfortable surfaces and more. They are carried out by professionals and are repeated as much as possible.
The merle coat pattern, which appears mottled, is not traditionally considered part of the breed standard. In May 2007, The Kennel Club decided not to register puppies with this coloration due to the health risks associated with the responsible gene, and in December of that year, formally amended its breed standard to disqualify merle dogs.[20] The Fédération Cynologique Internationale, which represents the major kennel clubs of 84 countries, also disqualified merle.[16] Other countries' kennel clubs, including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Germany, have also disqualified merle. However, in May 2008, the Chihuahua Club of America voted that merles would not be disqualified in the United States, and would be fully registrable and able to compete in AKC events. Opponents of merle recognition suspect the coloration came about by modern crossbreeding with other dogs and not by natural genetic drift.[21][citation needed]
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